Tractor Mac Family Reunion

Written and illustrated by Billy Steers

Tractor Mac loves that he is the only tractor in his farm family. Then one day, his friend Iron Dave the train brings him to a tractor dealership and shows him a whole lot full of big red tractors that look just like him. Are these tractors his real family? Tractor Mac is excited to find a place with so many familiar faces, but sad that he might have to leave the farm to be with them. Then all of the big red tractors in the lot help him to understand that his real home is with the family he's found with the animals and machines on Stony Meadow Farm.

A Hug Is for Holding Me

Written by Lisa Wheeler and illustrated by Lisk Feng

A Hug Is for Holding Me is a sweet, cozy book about love and affection and invites children to engage with the natural world in a fresh, new way. Some hugs are tight and some hugs are snug . . . but guess who gives the BEST hugs?

Mirabel's Missing Valentines

Written by Janet Lawler and illustrated by Olivia Chin Mueller

Poor shy Mirabel trembles at the thought of Valentine's Day. Yet the little mouse crafts her cards with a heart on every one. As she nervously hurries to school, she doesn't notice the valentines falling out of her bag! But with a little holiday kindness, the lost valentines make their way back to her . . . and bring joy into the lives of all who found them, too. This wonderful tale of overcoming insecurity will make its way to children's hearts.

Goat's Coat

Written by Tom Percival and illustrated by Christine Pym

This charmingly illustrated rhyming picture book about Alfonzo, a goat with a very special coat, celebrates the power of kindness and friendship. Let me tell you the tale of Alfonzo the goat, who was terribly proud of his lovely new coat. Alfonzo was happy; he pranced and he skipped. Then he heard a sad noise, croaking out of a ditch. Alfonzo couldn't be happier. He just got an amazing new coat, and he feels like a million dollars. But when he discovers some creatures in need of help, will Alfonzo be able to give up his treasured possession to save the day? This great big hug of a book shows that kindness is definitely the best recipe. Awards for Tom Percival Herman's Letter--A Kids' Indie Next List Pick

Make a Wish, Henry Bear

Written and illustrated by Liam Francis Walsh

Henry Bear has very unusual parents. They encourage him to stay up all night, eat chocolate cake at every meal, and get into trouble with his teacher. Why? Find out in this droll tale about making wishes with unanticipated consequences written and illustrated by New Yorker cartoonist Liam Francis Walsh, author of Fish, which Kirkus Reviews, in a starred review, called "full-bodied" and "rewarding."

Is That You, Eleanor Sue?

Written and illustrated by Tricia Tusa

Saturdays are dress-up days when Eleanor Sue Climbs out the window . . . Tiptoes over to the front door . . . And rings the doorbell. Ding dong. When her mother answers, she doesn’t see Eleanor Sue. She sees A cranky old neighbor. Or a hungry witch. Or a white-bearded wizard. Eleanor Sue is a master of disguise, but when her mother gets in on the act, along with Grandma, anything can happen in this whimsical picture book by award-winning author/illustrator Tricia Tusa.

I Loathe You

Written and illustrated by David Slonim

Unconditional loathing is disguised as monsterly love in this sweetly humorous picture book from acclaimed author-illustrator David Slonim. Just how much does Big Monster loathe Little Monster? Let it count the ways… I loathe you more than tooth decay More than blizzard snow in May More than garbage in a dump More than splinters in my rump No matter what, through thick and thin, I loathe you there and back again! Author and illustrator David Slonim depicts a tender, tongue-in-cheek celebration of a very special kind of loathe…er, love.

Pinocchio

Written by Carlo Collodi and illustrated by Quentin Greban

Perhaps the most popular and beloved children’s story of all time, Pinocchio tells the story of a wooden puppet that longs to become a real boy.

Bad Dog, Macy!

Written by Wenjun Qin and illustrated by Yinzhi Qin

Macy hasn't been a good dog, and it seems as if his mommy has abandoned him in an unfamiliar place! Luckily, Macy meets two other abandoned doggy friends, who keep him company. This is a funny story that will keep children entertained, as they wonder whether Macy and his friends have really been abandoned. What appears to be a sad tale quickly transforms into one about getting pampered and fresh haircuts!

What's for Breakfast?

Written and illustrated by Denys Cazet

"Wake up!" says Rufus, a large and very hungry owl. "It's time to catch the fearsome mouse. I'm in a mood for a bowl of mouse soup for breakfast." Pip, who's better at sleeping than swooping, leaps from the nest and lands right on top of that fearsome mouse whose name, he learns, is Theodore. Is it time for breakfast. . . . or friendship?Find out in this clever and classic picture book about two owls, a mouse, a banana, and an unlikely friendship.

The Truth About Elephants

Written and illustrated by Maxwell Eaton III

Did you know that an elephant's tusks never stop growing? Did you know that elephants can sometimes purr like giant cats? And that they use six sets of teeth throughout their lives? Impress your friends and teachers with these facts and more in this wildly entertaining (not to mention hilarious) nonfiction picture book offering everything you want to know about elephants.

Henry Goes West

Written and illustrated by Robert Quackenbush

Henry the Duck takes a trip out to the Wild West where he finds himself up to his feathers in merry mis-adventure in this fresh and lively picture book from beloved author Robert Quackenbush! Henry the Duck sure gets himself into some sticky situations! When he finally goes out to the wild, wild West to visit his friend Clara, he finds out that he has another surprise waiting for him back home. Children and parents alike will love following disaster-prone Henry through his adventures in travel, cleverly written and illustrated by Robert Quackenbush.