Best Children's Books About Families

Our Favorite 35 Books to Read With Your Kids About Families

Updated Mar. 12, 2019

All families are different. The one thing they seem to have in common is a the desire to work together and help each other out in difficult times. This doesn't always happen right away, but most families learn through the course of events that life seems to work out best when we invest our hearts and minds into one another.

Love Is My Favorite Thing book
#26
Love Is My Favorite Thing
Written and illustrated by Emma Chichester Clark
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5

Starring an enthusiastic pooch whose joy, optimism and love know no bounds, this lively picture book is based on Emma Chichester Clark’s own dog, and joyfully celebrates unconditional love. Plum has lots of favorite things—catching sticks, her bear, her bed—but really, LOVE is her absolute favorite thing. She loves her family and all the things they do together. Sometimes, however, Plum’s exuberance causes trouble, and she just can’t help being naughty. But fortunately, love is such a great thing that even when she makes mistakes, Plum’s family still adores her.

The Littlest Family's Big Day book
#27
The Littlest Family's Big Day
Written and illustrated by Emily Winfield Martin
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3

Who is only under 5 inches tall and has just moved to the woods? The cutest and littlest bear family you have ever seen—and their adopted teeny tiny fox tot! What happens when they venture out to explore their new world...? With an easy-to-read story and the careful brushstrokes of Emily Winfield Martin's illustrations, The Littlest Family's Big Day captures the mystery and magic of the woods. Inspired by classic children’s books such as The Littlest Fur Family and Dream Animals, this is a radiant treasure to be cherished for generations.

A Place to Start a Family book
#28
A Place to Start a Family
Written by David L. Harrison and illustrated by Giles Laroche
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-9

A poetry collection introducing animal architects that build remarkable structures in order to attract a mate and have babies. Many animals build something—a nest, tunnel, or web—in order to pair up, lay eggs, give birth, and otherwise perpetuate their species. Organized based on where creatures live—underground, in the water, on land, or in the air—twelve poems bring fish, insects, reptiles, mammals, and birds to life. Giles Laroche's intricate cut-paper illustrations are so life-like, readers will feel like they've stepped right into the homes of some of nature's best builders. Back matter includes more information about each animal.

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe book
#29
The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Written by C.S. Lewis and illustrated by Esperanza Rising
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12

They open a door and enter a world.

Squirrel's Family Tree book
#30
Squirrel's Family Tree
Written by Beth Ferry and illustrated by Anna Kang
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5

Squirrel gathers acorn seeds, sturdy little oak nut seeds. Anticipating future needs, she gathers acorn seeds. What makes an oak tree an oak tree and what makes a squirrel a squirrel? In Squirrel's Family Tree, things aren't always what they seem. As squirrel searches for, finds, and hides her acorn treasures beneath the shadows of the great oak trees in the forest, little does she know the role she plays in creating the very environment she forages in. With masterful illustrations by Papillon illustrator A. N. Kang and delightful, sweet rhymes by New York Times bestseller Beth Ferry, this read-aloud masterpiece about the beauty of nature and the intricate relationships that make it flourish is sure to become an instant classic.

Esperanza Rising Book Discussion Kit book
#31
Esperanza Rising Book Discussion Kit
Written and illustrated by Pam Munoz Ryan
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Esperanza and her mother are forced to leave their life of wealth and privilege in Mexico to go work in the labor camps of Southern California, where they must adapt to the harsh circumstances facing Mexican farm workers on the eve of the Great Depression.

How to Sell Your Family to the Aliens book
#32
How to Sell Your Family to the Aliens
Written by Paul Noth
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

This is an out-of-this-world funny first book in a madcap, illustrated adventure series from New Yorker cartoonist Paul Noth. Happy Conklin Jr. is the only 10-year-old who has to shave three times a day. Hap's dad is a brilliant inventor of screwball products, and being a Conklin kid means sometimes being experimented on. So Hap has his beard, and his five sisters each have their own unique--and often problematic--qualities too. And although Hap's dad has made a fortune with his wacky inventions sold via nonstop TV infomercials, all of that money has gone to Hap's tyrannical Grandma. While she lives in an enormous mansion, the rest of the family lives in two rooms in the basement. All Hap has ever wanted is to have a normal life, so when he sees a chance to get rid of Grandma, he takes it! He only means to swap out Grandma, but when he--oops!--sells his whole family to the aliens, he wants nothing more than to get them back. He just has to figure out . . . how?

The Elevator Family book
#33
The Elevator Family
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-10

The four members of the Wilson family decide to spend their holiday in one of the elevators at the San Francisco Hotel.

The Boxcar Children book
#34
The Boxcar Children
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 7-10

The Aldens begin their adventure by making a home in a boxcar. Their goal is to stay together, and in the process they find a grandfather.

Tractor Mac Family Reunion book
#35
Tractor Mac Family Reunion
Written and illustrated by Billy Steers
picture book
Recommend Ages: 2-5

Tractor Mac loves that he is the only tractor in his farm family. Then one day, his friend Iron Dave the train brings him to a tractor dealership and shows him a whole lot full of big red tractors that look just like him. Are these tractors his real family? Tractor Mac is excited to find a place with so many familiar faces, but sad that he might have to leave the farm to be with them. Then all of the big red tractors in the lot help him to understand that his real home is with the family he's found with the animals and machines on Stony Meadow Farm.

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