The Best 5 Picture Books About Powers

Updated Mar. 28, 2019

As children start learning about different powers (super strength, invisibility, magic, reading minds, flying, super speed, etc), their imagination is growing and expanding to new heights! Introducing them to different powers through reading books allows them to explore all kind of creative stories and ideas, sparking their own thoughts for creative play and imaginative dreams for themselves.

Malala's Magic Pencil book
#1
Malala's Magic Pencil
Written by Malala Yousafzai and illustrated by Kerascoet
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Thoughts from Mom of Boys

This shows magic in a whole new light. It is a true story of a young girl from Pakistan. She watched a show of a young boy that had a magic pencil. Whatever he drew with his magic pencil appeared. She wished she had one so she could draw things like a new ball for her and her brothers to play with. She wished for beautiful dresses for her mother and buildings for her father. She was very selfless in her wishes. Then one day she saw some very poor children and it changed her outlook on life. She realized how blessed she was to get to go to school. She wanted this for other children and started to write about it. This became magic to her and to others as people started listening to her story.

Malala's first picture book will inspire young readers everywhere to find the magic all around them. As a child in Pakistan, Malala made a wish for a magic pencil. She would use it to make everyone happy, to erase the smell of garbage from her city, to sleep an extra hour in the morning. But as she grew older, Malala saw that there were more important things to wish for. She saw a world that needed fixing. And even if she never found a magic pencil, Malala realized that she could still work hard every day to make her wishes come true. This beautifully illustrated volume tells Malala's story for a younger audience and shows them the worldview that allowed Malala to hold on to hope even in the most difficult of times.

The Day I Lost My Superpowers book
#2
The Day I Lost My Superpowers
Written by Michael Escoffier and illustrated by Kris Di Giacomo
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

When a young superhero-in-training gets hurt, she discovers that mothers have superpowers, too.

Strega Nona book
#3
Strega Nona
Written and illustrated by Tomie dePaola
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

When Strega Nona leaves him alone with her magic pasta pot, Big Anthony is determined to show the townspeople how it works in this classic Caldecott Honor book from Tomie dePaola. Strega Nona—"Grandma Witch"—is the source for potions, cures, magic, and comfort in her Calabrian town. Her magical everfull pasta pot is especially intriguing to hungry Big Anthony. He is supposed to look after her house and tend her garden but one day, when she goes over the mountain to visit Strega Amelia, Big Anthony recites the magic verse over the pasta pot, with disastrous results. In this retelling of an old tale, author-illustrator Tomie dePaola combines humor in the writing and warmth in the paintings as he builds the story to its hilarious climax.

Dylan the Villain book
#4
Dylan the Villain
Written and illustrated by K. G. Campbell
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-6
Thoughts from Mom of Boys

Dylan the Villain is an interesting tale of a mom and a dad that have a baby and find out he is a super villain! Unexpected? Certainly. But they love him as though he is the best thing in the world. They encourage all of his villainous activities and help him think he is the best there ever was. He believes it all, until he goes to school. We all know how that goes. There is always someone at school with whom we might compare our powers. Find out if Dylan is the very best, or not.

A surprising and laugh-out-loud showdown between two pint-sized super-villains, perfect for young fans of Despicable Me. Dylan’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Snivels, have always told him that he is the very best and cleverest super-villain in the whole wide world. And Dylan’s confident that it’s true–until he starts school and meets Addison Van Malice. Sure, Dylan’s costume is scary. But Addison Van Malice’s is bone-chilling. And yes, Dylan’s laugh is crazy. But Addison Van Malice’s is bananas. And Dylan’s inventions are certainly super-villainous. But Addison Van Malice’s are demonic! When their teacher, Ms. Ick, announces a Diabolical Robot Building Contest, Dylan sees his opportunity to prove that he really is the most evil villain of all. But Addison’s not giving in without a fight. And so begins a competition of skill and wits that doesn’t go the way anyone expected…

What's My Superpower? book
#5
What's My Superpower?
Written by Aviaq Johnston and illustrated by Tim Mack
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-18

Nalvana feels like all of her friends have some type of superpower. She has friends with super speed (who always beat her in races), friends with super strength (who can dangle from the monkey bars for hours), and friends who are better than her at a million other things. Nalvana thinks she must be the only kid in town without a superpower. But then her mom shows Nalvana that she is unique and special, and that her superpower was right in front of her all along.

Have a suggestion for a book to add to this list? Send an email to [email protected]!