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The Count of Monte Cristo (Edmond Dantes) Quotes

24 of the best book quotes from The Count of Monte Cristo (Edmond Dantes)
  1. #1
    “I have seen the man I loved preparing to become the murderer of my son!” She said these words with such overwhelming grief, in such a desperate voice, that when he heard it a sob rose in the count’s throat. The lion was tamed, the avenging angel overcome.
  2. #2
    [W]e frequently pass so near to happiness without seeing, without regarding it, or if we do see and regard it, yet without recognizing it.
  3. #3
    We are always in a hurry to be happy,... for when we have suffered a long time, we have great difficulty in believing in good fortune.
  4. #4
    For all evils there are two remedies - time and silence.
  5. #5
    Moral wounds have this peculiarity - they may be hidden, but they never close; always painful, always ready to bleed when touched, they remain fresh and open in the heart.
  6. #6
    I, who have also been betrayed, assassinated and cast into a tomb, I have emerged from that tomb by the grace of God and I owe it to God to take my revenge. He has sent me for that purpose. Here I am.
  7. #7
    “And now,” said the stranger, “farewell, goodness, humanity, gratitude ... Farewell all those feelings that nourish and illuminate the heart! I have taken the place of Providence to reward the good; now let the avenging God make way for me to punish the wrongdoer!”
  8. #8
    The heart breaks when it has swelled too much in the warm breath of hope, then finds itself enclosed in cold reality.
  9. #9
    So all my opinions—I would not say political, but private opinions—are confined to three feelings: I love my father, I respect Monsieur Morrel and I adore Mercédès.
  10. #10
    Happiness is like one of those palaces on an enchanted island, its gates guarded by dragons. One must fight to gain it.
  11. #11
    “But, with such an outlook,” Franz told the count, “which makes you judge and executioner in your own case, it would be hard for you to confine yourself to actions that would leave you forever immune to the power of the law. Hatred is blind and anger deaf: the one who pours himself a cup of vengeance is likely to drink a bitter draught.”
    “Yes, if he is clumsy and poor; no, if he is a millionaire and adroit.”
  12. #12
    What is truly desirable? A possession that we cannot have. So, my life is devoted to seeing things that I cannot understand and obtaining things that are impossible to have. I succeed by two means: money and will. I am as persevering in the pursuit of my whims as, for example, you are, Monsieur Danglars, in building a railway; or you, Monsieur de Villefort, in condemning a man to death; or you, Monsieur Debray, pacifying a kingdom; you, Monsieur de Château-Renaud, in finding favour with a woman; or you, Monsieur Morrel, in breaking a horse that no one else can ride.
  13. #13
    I am not proud, but I am happy; and happiness blinds, I think, more than pride.
  14. #14
    All human wisdom is contained in these two words - Wait and Hope.
  15. #15
    [T]o learn is not to know; there are the learners and the learned. Memory makes the one, philosophy the other.
  16. #16
    “Oh, God,” said Monte Cristo, “your vengeance may sometimes be slow in coming, but I think that then it is all the more complete.”
  17. #17
    He decided it was human hatred and not divine vengeance that had plunged him into this abyss. He doomed these unknown men to every torment that his inflamed imagination could devise, while still considering that the most frightful were too mild and, above all, too brief for them: torture was followed by death, and death brought, if not repose, at least an insensibility that resembled it.
  18. #18
    He decided it was human hatred and not divine vengeance that had plunged him into this abyss. He doomed these unknown men to every torment that his inflamed imagination could devise, while still considering that the most frightful were too mild and, above all, too brief for them: torture was followed by death, and death brought, if not repose, at least an insensibility that resembled it.
  19. #19
    There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more. He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness.
  20. #20
    [H]e felt he had passed beyond the bounds of vengeance, and that he could no longer say, “God is for and with me.”
  21. #21
    I wish to be Providence myself, for I feel that the most beautiful, noblest, most sublime thing in the world, is to recompense and punish.
  22. #22
    “I regret now,” said he, “having helped you in your late inquiries, or having given you the information I did.”
    “Why so?” inquired Dantès.
    “Because it has instilled a new passion in your heart—that of vengeance.”
  23. #23
    “Come now, “he said. Have you anything to fear? It seems to me, on the contrary, that everything is working out as you would wish.”
    “That is precisely what terrifies me,” said Dantès. “I cannot think that man is meant to find happiness so easily! Happiness is like one of those palaces on an enchanted island, its gates guarded by dragons. One must fight to gain it; and, in truth, I do not know what I have done to deserve the good fortune of becoming Mercédès’ husband.”
  24. #24
    You know, mother, Monsieur de Monte Cristo is almost a man of the East and an Oriental; in order not to interfere with his freedom to take revenge, he never eats or drinks in his enemy’s house.
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