An Award-Winning Book Club for Kids
Shop Now

Color Blindness: Books For Kids

Looking for a list of the best children's books about color blindness?

As you can see, this list of kids books about color blindness is a work in progress! We’re currently exploring the best books available, and we’d love your input. If you have a title you’d suggest including on our list of kids books about color blindness, please share it with us!

We’ll be featuring a variety of titles on our list, from well known classics to popular bestsellers to lesser known titles that deserve a bigger audience. We’re also including books for a range of ages, from board books for babies and toddlers, to picture books for preschool and kindergarten age kids, to chapter books for early elementary age kids.

We’d love to hear any book suggestions you have—you can comment below or email us at [email protected].

The Extraordinary Colors of Auden Dare
Written & illustrated by Zillah Bethell
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12

Auden Dare is color blind and lives in a world where water is scarce and families must live on a weekly, allocated supply.When Auden’s uncle, the scientist Dr. Bloom, suddenly dies,he leaves a note to Auden and to his classmate Vivi Rookmini. Together, the notes lead them to Paragon—a robot. As Auden, Vivi, and Paragon try to uncover Paragon’spurpose and put together the clues Dr. Bloom left behind,they find out that Dr. Bloom’s death was anything butinnocent, that powerful people are searching for Paragon—and that it’s up to Auden and Vivi to stop them.

Ada Lace Sees Red
Written by Emily Calandrelli and Tamson Weston & illustrated by Renee Kurilla
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-10

Ada Lace is building a new robot! She’s determined to beat Milton in the upcoming robotics competition. But she’s distracted—Ada finds her dad’s art class impossible, while Nina is the star of the class, basking in the glory of being Mr. Lace’s star pupil.

When Mr. Lace suggests that Nina put on an art show, Ada becomes jealous and loses her temper. Now Ada isn’t speaking to her dad, she’s falling behind in art class, and she still doesn’t know how to fix her robot. As the competition looms closer, Ada starts to wonder if there might be a way to use both science and art to solve her problems.

Will Ada make up with her father in time to test her hypothesis? Or will her hurt feelings leave her seeing red and without a medal at the end of the day?

    Did you enjoy our children's book recommendations? Did you know you can help us improve this list? Check out our Community Handbook and learn how to add tags to books.

    Suggested Links