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Computers: Books For Kids

Looking for a list of the best kids books about computers?

Computers and technology are omnipresent today. Screens abound and with them frequent contact with our loved ones far away (“Hey Grammy!”), instantaneous access to information (“Yes, it looks like pelicans really do eat crabs!”), directions to new places and many more awesome opportunities. But they also bring with them dangers that we, as parents, are growing increasingly aware of. Is the solution to lock away all screens and return to a frontier lifestyle? Perhaps. But more likely it’s simply to teach our children wise technology usage and model good behavior. Books can always help, so here are a few worth investigating as you encourage your children to be wise, unplug and use computers and technology to do awesome things (like code!) rather than just waste time. And don’t worry, we threw in a few about computer history as well… because who doesn’t love Ada Lovelace!?

Top 10 Books About Computers

#1
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Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code
Written by Laurie Wallmark & illustrated by Katy Wu
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-9
Who was Grace Hopper? A software tester, workplace jester, cherished mentor, ace inventor, avid reader, naval leader—AND rule breaker, chance taker, and troublemaker. Acclaimed picture book author Laurie Wallmark (Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine) once again tells the riveting story of a trailblazing woman. Grace Hopper coined the term “computer bug” and taught computers to “speak English.” Throughout her life, Hopper succeeded in doing what no one had ever done before. Delighting in difficult ideas and in defying expectations, the insatiably curious Hopper truly was “Amazing Grace” . . . and a role model for science- and math-minded girls and boys. With a wealth of witty quotes, and richly detailed illustrations, this book brings Hopper's incredible accomplishments to life.
#2
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When Charlie McButton Lost Power
Written by Suzanne Collins & illustrated by Mike Lester
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm
A wonderful book about unplugging and using your imagination and spending time with those you love! :) I didn't love the illustrations at first, but they've really grown on my and I think they, and the rest of this book, are so fun! I especially think all of the wording and rhyme is fantastic.
Thoughts from The Book Snob Mom
I'm going to commit blasphemy here and say that Suzanne Collins' (of The Hunger Games' fame) rhyming in this book is on par with Dr. Seuss (only with fewer made up words)—it's seriously such a fun read-aloud that trips right off the tongue. Initially, the illustrations weren't my favorite, but after reading it several times, I think they add a delightful pizzazz and sense of chaos that really adds to the story. With the prevalence of technology, the message that relationships can be strengthened and fun had without turning to electronics is lovely.
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Charlie McButton likes computer games so much, he never plays with anything else. When a thunderstorm knocks out the electricity, his tech empire comes tumbling down, and his whole world loses power. Charlie needs batteries?FAST! But the only triple- A?s he can find are in his little sister?s talking doll. Will he resort to desperate measures and cause his sister to have a meltdown of her own? Or will he snap out of his computer craze long enough to realize his sister might be fun, even if she doesn?t come with batteries? Collins and Lester team up for a hilarious and timely tale that will crack up young computer addicts and those who love them!
#3
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Adi Sorts with Variables
Written by Caroline Karanja & illustrated by Ben William Whitehouse
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
It's time to clean Adi's room! If only a computer could do it for her! That gives Adi and her best friend Gabi an idea-think like a coder! These scientific thinkers put on their computer coding caps and make cleaning up a snap by sorting with variables!
#4
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How to Code a Sandcastle
Written by Josh Funk & illustrated by Sara Palacios
Thoughts from The Book Snob Mom
While this isn't one I'd enjoy reading over and over again at storytime, it is a delightful introduction to programming that both has a story that makes things relevant to children and includes some actual code and coding principles!
Thoughts from Mr. Staccato
A good introduction to programming concepts. A little tedious to read. Covers the idea of breaking down problems into solvable chunks, if/then/else statements and loops and sequences.
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
All summer, Pearl has been trying to build the perfect sandcastle, but out-of-control Frisbees and mischievous puppies keep getting in the way! Pearl and her robot friend Pascal have one last chance, and this time, they’re going to use code to get the job done. Using fundamental computer coding concepts like sequences and loops, Pearl and Pascal are able to break down their sandcastle problem into small, manageable steps. If they can create working code, this could turn out to be the best beach day ever! With renowned computer science nonprofit Girls Who Code, Josh Funk and Sara Palacios use humor, relatable situations, and bright artwork to introduce kids to the fun of coding.
#5
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Unplugged
Written & illustrated by Steve Antony
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm
This little robot, Blip, ends up getting unplugged during a blackout and tumbles her way outside, where she enjoys the outdoors and makes new friends. After a fun day, she goes back home and plugs back into the computer she loves, but misses being unplugged. I like that this book portrays the message of being unplugged without being preachy, and I loved that the illustrations are all black and white until Blip goes outside.
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5
Meet Blip. Blip loves being plugged into her computer. When a blackout occurs, Blip trips over her wire and tumbles outside. Suddenly, Blip's gray world is filled with color and excitement. She plays with her new friends and has adventures all day long. When Blip finally returns home, she realizes that the world can be even brighter once you unplug.
#6
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Tek
Written & illustrated by Patrick McDonnell
Thoughts from Mr. Staccato
This book comes shaped like an iPad. It's humorous and tells the story of Tek, a caveboy that's too interested in his computer, tablets and gameboys to go outside and play with his dino friends.
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
From a beloved, bestselling Caldecott Honor recipient comes a hilarious reminder of how technology can take us backward... all the way to the times of prehistoric man! Tek is a cave boy in love with tech: his tablet, videogames, phone, and TV keep him deep in his cave, glued to his devices, day in and day out. He never sees his friends or family anymore--and his ability to communicate has devolved to just one word: "UGH"! Can anyone in the village convince Tek to unplug and come outside into the big, beautiful world? A distinctive package and design cleverly evokes the experience of using an electronic device that eventually shuts down... and after a magic page turn, Tek (and the reader) reconnects with the real world.
#7
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A Computer Called Katherine
Written by Suzanne Slade & illustrated by Veronica Miller Jamison
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
The inspiring true story of mathematician Katherine Johnson--made famous by the award-winning film Hidden Figures--who counted and computed her way to NASA and helped put a man on the moon! Katherine knew it was wrong that African Americans didn't have the same rights as others--as wrong as 5+5=12. She knew it was wrong that people thought women could only be teachers or nurses--as wrong as 10-5=3. And she proved everyone wrong by zooming ahead of her classmates, starting college at fifteen, and eventually joining NASA, where her calculations helped pioneer America's first manned flight into space, its first manned orbit of Earth, and the world's first trip to the moon! Award-winning author Suzanne Slade and debut artist Veronica Miller Jamison tell the story of a NASA "computer" in this smartly written, charmingly illustrated biography.
#8
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Ada Lovelace
Written by Isabel Sanchez Vegara & illustrated by Zafouko Yamamoto
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Meet Ada Lovelace, the British mathematician and daughter of poet Lord Byron. New in the Little People, Big Dreams series, this inspiring and informative little biography follows the colourful life of Lord Byron’s daughter, from her early love of logic, to her plans for the world's first computer program. With stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, this empowering series celebrates the important life stories of wonderful women of the world. From designers and artists to scientists, all of them went on to achieve incredible things, yet all of them began life as a little child with a dream. These books make the lives of these role models accessible for children, providing a powerful message to inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world!
#9
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Nerdy Birdy Tweets
Written by Aaron Reynolds & illustrated by Matt Davies
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Nerdy Birdy and his best friend, Vulture, are very different. Nerdy Birdy loves video games, but Vulture finds them BORING. Vulture loves snacking on dead things, but Nerdy Birdy finds that GROSS. Luckily, you don’t have to agree on everything to still be friends. One day, Nerdy Birdy joins Tweetster, and the friend requests start flying in. Vulture watches as Nerdy Birdy gets swept up in his new friendships, but when she finally gets angry, Nerdy Birdy knows just what to do to make things right.
#10
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The Friendship Code
Written & illustrated by Stacia Deutsch
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12
Loops, variables, input/output – Lucy can’t wait to get started with the new coding club at school. Finally, an after school activity that she’s really interested in. But Lucy’s excitement turns to disappointment when she’s put into a work group with girls she barely knows. All she wanted to do was make an app that she believes will help someone very special to her. Suddenly, Lucy begins to get cryptic coding messages and needs some help translating them. She soon discovers that coding – and friendship – takes time, dedication, and some laughs!
Table of Contents
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Books About Computers and History

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A Computer Called Katherine
Written by Suzanne Slade & illustrated by Veronica Miller Jamison
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
The inspiring true story of mathematician Katherine Johnson--made famous by the award-winning film Hidden Figures--who counted and computed her way to NASA and helped put a man on the moon! Katherine knew it was wrong that African Americans didn't have the same rights as others--as wrong as 5+5=12. She knew it was wrong that people thought women could only be teachers or nurses--as wrong as 10-5=3. And she proved everyone wrong by zooming ahead of her classmates, starting college at fifteen, and eventually joining NASA, where her calculations helped pioneer America's first manned flight into space, its first manned orbit of Earth, and the world's first trip to the moon! Award-winning author Suzanne Slade and debut artist Veronica Miller Jamison tell the story of a NASA "computer" in this smartly written, charmingly illustrated biography.
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Ada Lovelace
Written by Isabel Sanchez Vegara & illustrated by Zafouko Yamamoto
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Meet Ada Lovelace, the British mathematician and daughter of poet Lord Byron. New in the Little People, Big Dreams series, this inspiring and informative little biography follows the colourful life of Lord Byron’s daughter, from her early love of logic, to her plans for the world's first computer program. With stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, this empowering series celebrates the important life stories of wonderful women of the world. From designers and artists to scientists, all of them went on to achieve incredible things, yet all of them began life as a little child with a dream. These books make the lives of these role models accessible for children, providing a powerful message to inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world!
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Ada Lovelace
Written by Isabel Sanchez Vegara & illustrated by Zafouko Yamamoto
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-4
New, in the My First Little People, Big Dreams series: Introduce your littlest one to the world’s first computer programmer, Ada Lovelace. Told in simple sentences, this young reader edition of the best-selling series is perfect to read out loud to little dreamers. This empowering series celebrates the important life stories of wonderful women of the world – and is now in available in a board format for little hands! These books make the lives of these role models accessible for the youngest children, providing a powerful message to inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world!
Honorable Mentions
Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science book
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Margaret and the Moon: How Margaret Hamilton Saved the First Lunar Landing book
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Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine book
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Ada's Ideas book
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  1. Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science - From nonfiction stars Diane Stanley and Jessie Hartland comes a beautifully illustrated biography of Ada Lovelace, who is known as the first computer programmer. Two hundred years ago, a daughter was born to the famous poet, Lord Byron, and his mathematical wife, Annabella. Like her father, Ada had a vivid imagination and a creative gift for connecting ideas in original ways. Like her mother, she had a passion for science, math, and machines. It was a very good combination. Ada hoped that one day she could do something important with her creative and nimble mind. A hundred years before the dawn of the digital age, Ada Lovelace envisioned the computer-driven world we know today. And in demonstrating how the machine would be coded, she wrote the first computer program. She would go down in history as Ada Lovelace, the first computer programmer. Diane Stanley’s lyrical writing and Jessie Hartland’s vibrant illustrations capture the spirit of Ada Lovelace and bring her fascinating story vividly to life.

  2. Margaret and the Moon: How Margaret Hamilton Saved the First Lunar Landing - A true story from one of the Women of NASA! Margaret Hamilton loved numbers as a young girl. She knew how many miles it was to the moon (and how many back). She loved studying algebra and geometry and calculus and using math to solve problems in the outside world. Soon math led her to MIT and then to helping NASA put a man on the moon! She handwrote code that would allow the spacecraft’s computer to solve any problems it might encounter. Apollo 8. Apollo 9. Apollo 10. Apollo 11. Without her code, none of those missions could have been completed. Dean Robbins and Lucy Knisley deliver a lovely portrayal of a pioneer in her field who never stopped reaching for the stars.

  3. Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine - Offers an illustrated telling of the story of Ada Byron Lovelace, from her early creative fascination with mathematics and science and her devastating bout with measles, to the ground-breaking algorithm she wrote for Charles Babbage’s analytical engine.

  4. Ada's Ideas - Ada Lovelace (1815–1852) was the daughter of Lord Byron, a poet, and Anna Isabella Milbanke, a mathematician. Her parents separated when she was young, and her mother insisted on a logic-focused education, rejecting Byron’s “mad” love of poetry. But Ada remained fascinated with her father and considered mathematics “poetical science.” Via her friendship with inventor Charles Babbage, she became involved in “programming” his Analytical Engine, a precursor to the computer, thus becoming the world’s first computer programmer. This picture book biography of Ada Lovelace is a compelling portrait of a woman who saw the potential for numbers to make art.

Want to see books about history?

Books About Computers and Female Scientists

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Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code
Written by Laurie Wallmark & illustrated by Katy Wu
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-9
Who was Grace Hopper? A software tester, workplace jester, cherished mentor, ace inventor, avid reader, naval leader—AND rule breaker, chance taker, and troublemaker. Acclaimed picture book author Laurie Wallmark (Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine) once again tells the riveting story of a trailblazing woman. Grace Hopper coined the term “computer bug” and taught computers to “speak English.” Throughout her life, Hopper succeeded in doing what no one had ever done before. Delighting in difficult ideas and in defying expectations, the insatiably curious Hopper truly was “Amazing Grace” . . . and a role model for science- and math-minded girls and boys. With a wealth of witty quotes, and richly detailed illustrations, this book brings Hopper's incredible accomplishments to life.
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Adi Sorts with Variables
Written by Caroline Karanja & illustrated by Ben William Whitehouse
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
It's time to clean Adi's room! If only a computer could do it for her! That gives Adi and her best friend Gabi an idea-think like a coder! These scientific thinkers put on their computer coding caps and make cleaning up a snap by sorting with variables!
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Women Who Launched the Computer Age
Written by Laurie Calkhoven & illustrated by Alyssa Petersen
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-8
This book was chosen by the Children’s Book Council as a best STEM book of 2017! Meet the women who programmed the first all-electronic computer and built the technological language kids today can’t live without in this fascinating, nonfiction Level 3 Ready-to-Read, part of a new series of biographies about people “you should meet!” In 1946, six brilliant young women programmed the first all-electronic, programmable computer, the ENIAC, part of a secret World War II project. They learned to program without any programming languages or tools, and by the time they were finished, the ENIAC could run a complicated calculus equation in seconds. But when the ENIAC was presented to the press and public, the women were never introduced or given credit for their work. Learn all about what they did and how their invention still matters today in this story of six amazing young women everyone should meet! A special section at the back of the book includes extras on subjects like history and math, plus interesting trivia facts about how computers have changed over time. With the You Should Meet series, learning about historical figures has never been so much fun!
Honorable Mentions
Gabi's If/Then Garden book
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Adi's Perfect Patterns and Loops book
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Hidden Figures Young Readers' Edition book
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The Girl with a Mind for Math book
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  1. Gabi's If/Then Garden - Gabi’s garden needs some help. Where to begin? Gabi and her best friend Adi use if/then statements to decide what to plant, what to water, and what to pick! These scientific thinkers find ways every day to use computer coding concepts to make work and play more fun!

  2. Adi's Perfect Patterns and Loops - Best friends Adi and Gabi love to play with Adi’s toy train. Round and round it goes-choo choo! Watching it loop the track gives the girls an idea. These scientific thinkers use their computer coding knowledge to put the train to work!

  3. Hidden Figures Young Readers' Edition - New York Times bestselling author Margot Lee Shetterly’s book is now available in a new edition perfect for young readers. This is the amazing true story of four African-American female mathematicians at NASA who helped achieve some of the greatest moments in our space program. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner. Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules, and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. This book brings to life the stories of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden, four African-American women who lived through the civil rights era, the Space Race, the Cold War, and the movement for gender equality, and whose work forever changed the face of NASA and the country.

  4. The Girl with a Mind for Math - Meet Raye Montague—the hidden mastermind who made waves in the U.S. Navy! After touring a German submarine in the early 1940s, young Raye set her sights on becoming an engineer. Little did she know sexism and racial inequality would challenge that dream every step of the way, even keeping her greatest career accomplishment a secret for decades. Through it all, the gifted mathematician persisted—finally gaining her well-deserved title in history: a pioneer who changed the course of ship design forever. The Girl With a Mind for Math: The Story of Raye Montague is the third book in a riveting educational series about the inspiring lives of amazing scientists. In addition to the illustrated rhyming tale, you’ll find a complete biography, fun facts, a colorful timeline of events, and even a note from Montague herself!

Books About Computers and Social Themes

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Tek
Written & illustrated by Patrick McDonnell
Thoughts from Mr. Staccato
This book comes shaped like an iPad. It's humorous and tells the story of Tek, a caveboy that's too interested in his computer, tablets and gameboys to go outside and play with his dino friends.
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
From a beloved, bestselling Caldecott Honor recipient comes a hilarious reminder of how technology can take us backward... all the way to the times of prehistoric man! Tek is a cave boy in love with tech: his tablet, videogames, phone, and TV keep him deep in his cave, glued to his devices, day in and day out. He never sees his friends or family anymore--and his ability to communicate has devolved to just one word: "UGH"! Can anyone in the village convince Tek to unplug and come outside into the big, beautiful world? A distinctive package and design cleverly evokes the experience of using an electronic device that eventually shuts down... and after a magic page turn, Tek (and the reader) reconnects with the real world.
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Nerdy Birdy Tweets
Written by Aaron Reynolds & illustrated by Matt Davies
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Nerdy Birdy and his best friend, Vulture, are very different. Nerdy Birdy loves video games, but Vulture finds them BORING. Vulture loves snacking on dead things, but Nerdy Birdy finds that GROSS. Luckily, you don’t have to agree on everything to still be friends. One day, Nerdy Birdy joins Tweetster, and the friend requests start flying in. Vulture watches as Nerdy Birdy gets swept up in his new friendships, but when she finally gets angry, Nerdy Birdy knows just what to do to make things right.
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Mayday
Written by Karen Harrington
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12
In the tradition of Counting By 7s and The Thing About Jellyfish, a heartwarming coming-of-age story about grief, family, friendship, and the importance of finding your voice Wayne Kovok lives in a world of After. After his uncle in the army was killed overseas. After Wayne and his mother survived a plane crash while coming back from the funeral. After he lost his voice. Wayne has always used his love of facts to communicate ("Did you know more people die each year from shaking a vending machine than from shark attacks?"). Without his voice, how will he wow the prettiest girl in school? How will he stand up to his drill-sergeant grandfather? And how will he share his hopes with his deadbeat dad? It's not until Wayne loses his voice completely that he realizes how much he doesn't say. Filled with Karen Harrington's signature heart and humor, Mayday tackles an unforgettable journey of family and friendship.
Honorable Mentions
Timmy's Monster Diary: Screen Time Stress book
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On the Internet book
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Mia Measures Up book
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The Right Hook of Devin Velma book
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  1. Timmy's Monster Diary: Screen Time Stress - Meet Timmy, a lovable monster who can’t get enough of the coolest gadgets and video games. Too bad he doesn’t realize how much time he spends each day in front of a screen. In the same humorous spirit of Diary of a Wimpy Kid comes Timmy’s Monster Diary: Screen Time Stress. Using the “Time-Telling” and “ST4” techniques developed by Dr. Raun Melmed of the Melmed Center in Arizona, Timmy’s Monster Diary teaches kids how to self-monitor the amount of time they spend on technology. Timmy’s hilarious doodles and diary entries chronicle his delightful adventures, misadventures, and eventual triumph in a funny, relatable way. It’s the one book that kids will want to turn off the TV and read! Timmy’s Monster Diary also includes a resource section to help parents and teachers implement Dr. Melmed’s methods, plus ST4 reminders that kids can remove, color, and place around the house.

  2. On the Internet - On the Internet: Our First Talk About Online Safety introduces children to the basics of online safety in a story-based, conversational style. Using real-world examples set within the context of a child who is using the Internet for the first time and watching an older sibling interact with social media, Dr. Roberts takes readers through several common scenarios around parental supervision, online bullying and anonymity. She also includes examples of people who use the Internet to make the world a better place. On the Internet addresses common safety concerns in a child-centered way and offers easy-to-understand rationales as to why it’s important to maintain boundaries online just as in real life. The World Around Us series introduces children to complex cultural, social and environmental issues that they may encounter outside their homes, in an accessible way. Sidebars offer further reading for older children or care providers who have bigger questions. For younger children just starting to make these observations, the simple question-and-answer format of the main text will provide a foundation of knowledge on the subject matter.

  3. Mia Measures Up - Mia is being cyber-bullied, and she’s determined to find out who is responsible in the latest addition to the Cupcake Diaries series. Mia is upset when her parents tell her she’s too young to go to a concert without adult supervision. She’s old enough to help run a cupcake business! Why can’t her parents see that she’s also responsible enough to do whatever she wants? And just when she’s reached a compromise with her parents (her older brother Dan will go to the concert with her), Mia finds out she’s being cyber-bullied on social media. It’s the Cupcake Club to the rescue as they all help Mia solve her online bullying mystery!

  4. The Right Hook of Devin Velma - Even though he suffers from social anxiety, twelve-year-old Addison agrees to help his best friend achieve social media fame while at a nationally-televised NBA game.

Books About Computers and Family

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When Charlie McButton Lost Power
Written by Suzanne Collins & illustrated by Mike Lester
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm
A wonderful book about unplugging and using your imagination and spending time with those you love! :) I didn't love the illustrations at first, but they've really grown on my and I think they, and the rest of this book, are so fun! I especially think all of the wording and rhyme is fantastic.
Thoughts from The Book Snob Mom
I'm going to commit blasphemy here and say that Suzanne Collins' (of The Hunger Games' fame) rhyming in this book is on par with Dr. Seuss (only with fewer made up words)—it's seriously such a fun read-aloud that trips right off the tongue. Initially, the illustrations weren't my favorite, but after reading it several times, I think they add a delightful pizzazz and sense of chaos that really adds to the story. With the prevalence of technology, the message that relationships can be strengthened and fun had without turning to electronics is lovely.
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Charlie McButton likes computer games so much, he never plays with anything else. When a thunderstorm knocks out the electricity, his tech empire comes tumbling down, and his whole world loses power. Charlie needs batteries?FAST! But the only triple- A?s he can find are in his little sister?s talking doll. Will he resort to desperate measures and cause his sister to have a meltdown of her own? Or will he snap out of his computer craze long enough to realize his sister might be fun, even if she doesn?t come with batteries? Collins and Lester team up for a hilarious and timely tale that will crack up young computer addicts and those who love them!
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Robobaby
Written by David Wiesner
board book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
Robots are much more than machines in the emotionally resonant world of _Robobaby_, where the arrival of a new baby in a robot family is a festive occasion. Iconic picture book creator David Wiesner captures the excitement as Lugnut (father), Diode (mother), and big sister Cathode (Cathy) welcome the newcomer. Cathy, with her handy toolbox and advanced knowledge of robotics and IT, is ignored while the adults bungle the process of assembling baby Flange, with near catastrophic results. As the frantic, distracted adults rush about aimlessly, Cathy, unobserved, calmly clears up the technical difficulties and bonds with her new baby brother. _Robobaby_ is a shout‑out for girl scientists and makers, and a treat for all young robot enthusiasts.
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You're Missing It!
Written by Brady Smith & illustrated by Tiffani Thiessen
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5
A busy Hollywood couple spins a hilarious cautionary tale about what happens when you are glued to your phone. It's a lively day at the neighborhood park. Birds are singing, squirrels are frolicking, dogs are causing a commotion--and wide-eyed children are enthralled by it all. Too bad the parents are missing everything! It's going to take something really BIG to get them to disengage from their phones . . . This timely story, brought to life with beautiful bold art, is a great reminder to slow down and savor time together.
Honorable Mentions
The Exact Location of Home book
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Tea with Grandpa book
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The Great Googlini book
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  1. The Exact Location of Home - Kate Messner pens a new moving tale of family and friendship about a tech-savvy boy searching for his father during tough times. Kirby “Zig” Zigonski lives for the world of simple circuits, light bulbs, buzzers, and motors. Electronics are, after all, much more predictable than most people—especially his father, who he hasn’t seen in over a year. When his dad’s latest visit is canceled with no explanation and his mom seems to be hiding something, Zig turns to his best friend Gianna and a new gizmo—a garage sale GPS unit—for help. Convinced that his dad is leaving clues around town to explain his absence, Zig sets out to find him. Following one clue after another, logging mile after mile, Zig soon discovers that people aren’t always what they seem . . . and sometimes, there’s more than one set of coordinates for home. An important story of love and hope that will capture readers’ hearts, The Exact Location of Home is another must read from beloved author Kate Messner.

  2. Tea with Grandpa - No matter how far apart they are, a little girl and her grandfather share a cup of tea every day at half past three.

  3. The Great Googlini - Filip, the ten-year-old son of Croatian immigrants, lives in a boring suburb of the big city,where he passes his time either at school or in his cozy kitchen, googling everything from dinosaurs to the Hubble Space Telescope. When his favorite uncle gets sick, Filip turns to Google for answers. Instead he receives a visit from the Great Googlini, a tiny woman in Converse sneakers who swirls out of the computer vents. She’s not really a genie, she explains: “I’m more of an archivist.” Her visit is a little bit of magic that lets Filip see the magic all around him. Ultimately about the things we can know and the things we can’t, this is a smart, touching, funny chapter book about growing up, braving tough times and looking for answers.

Want to see books about family?

Books About Computers and School

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The Friendship Code
Written & illustrated by Stacia Deutsch
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12
Loops, variables, input/output – Lucy can’t wait to get started with the new coding club at school. Finally, an after school activity that she’s really interested in. But Lucy’s excitement turns to disappointment when she’s put into a work group with girls she barely knows. All she wanted to do was make an app that she believes will help someone very special to her. Suddenly, Lucy begins to get cryptic coding messages and needs some help translating them. She soon discovers that coding – and friendship – takes time, dedication, and some laughs!
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Fuzzy
Written by Tom Angleberger & illustrated by Paul Dellinger
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12
At Vanguard One Middle School (aka Vainglorious), the halls are crawling with robots, but Fuzzy isn't your run-of-the-mill android. When Fuzzy enrolls at Vainglorious as part of the Robot Integration Program, he is quickly befriended by Max, who is determined to help him learn everything he needs to know. The middle school of the future is just as fraught with crazy kids, tricky teachers, and bad smells as the middle school of today. Add in some evil schemers, and you have real trouble. Together, Max and Fuzzy reveal the super-secret, nefarious purpose behind the Robot Integration Program. They must fight to save the school before it's too late. Fuzzy is one girl's quest to befriend a robot, survive middle school, and save the world.
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Lights, Music, Code!
Written by Jo Whittemore
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12
When Maya starts spending a lot of time with Maddie, an old friend, her friends from coding club worry she won't finish her part of the project, coding the lights and music for the winter dance.
Honorable Mentions
Ask Emma (Ask Emma Book 1) book
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Spotlight on Coding Club! book
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Robot Queen book
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TBH #3: TBH, Too Much Drama book
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  1. Ask Emma (Ask Emma Book 1) - Emma Woods knows just how to fix all her peers’ problems-or so she thinks-in this first book in the brand-new middle grade series Ask Emma, from the bestselling creators behind the Cupcake Club series! When 13-year-old Emma Woods gets that tingling feeling in her fingertips, she knows she’s on to a great idea-and starting an advice blog for her classmates at Austen Middle may be one of her most brilliant ones yet! Who better to give advice on friendship, style, school, and even crushes than someone who’s going through it too? But when Ask Emma goes live, she quickly realizes not everyone sees it that way. Suddenly, Emma is bombarded with peers asking her to help them postpone quizzes, get out of detention, and cut gym class short. This wasn’t exactly what she had in mind. . . .What’s worse, someone is posting hurtful comments, telling her to mind her own business. Despite her good intentions, Emma’s blog seems to only be getting her-and her friends—deeper and deeper into trouble. Will Ask Emma come to an end before it’s really begun? Or can Emma find her voice, write what’s in her heart, and truly stand up for what she believes in? This book will include an appendix on cyberbullying resources.

  2. Spotlight on Coding Club! - Perfect for fans of The Babysitters Club and anyone interested in computer science, this series is published in partnership with the organization Girls Who Code! It’s almost time for the talent show at school, and Erin couldn’t be more excited. It’s her time to take center stage! Plus, she and her friends from coding club are putting together an awesome coding program for the show. But Erin has a big secret: she has anxiety. And when things start piling up at home and school, she starts having trouble handling everything. Her friends from coding club have always been there for her, but will they be as understanding when the going gets tough? Sometimes in coding—like in friendship—things don’t go exactly as planned, but the outcome can be even better than you’d imagined.

  3. Robot Queen - Today is a special day at Kylie Jean’s school, where everyone works on computer projects and learning coding, and Kylie is fascinated by the robotics team called RoboGirls—so she resolves to build a robot of her own, so she can impress the older girls, and join the team in time for the competition.

  4. TBH #3: TBH, Too Much Drama - Told entirely in text messages, the third book in this addictive series from the acclaimed author of 11 Before 12 is perfect for fans of Lauren Myracle and Rachel Renee Russell. Cece, Gabby, and Prianka can’t wait for Spirit Week, aka the last week of school before summer break! And they’re already making plans for the best summer ever—including a friends-only camping trip, plenty of pool time, and a top-secret shared notebook. But between Pajama Day and pizza parties, Gabby accidentally leaks Cece’s most embarrassing secret to the whole school in a meme that goes viral. Half the squad thinks it’s no big deal, but Cece needs a time-out from all the drama—even if that means taking a break from her best friends.

Want to see books about school?

Books About Computers and Problem Solving

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Hello Ruby: Journey Inside the Computer
Written by Linda Liukas
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
What exactly is a computer? How does it work? What is it made of? Learn all this and more with Ruby! In Ruby's world anything is possible if you put your mind to it—even fixing her father's broken computer! Join Ruby and her new friend, Mouse, on an imaginative journey through the insides of a computer in search of the missing Cursor. From bits and logic gates to computer hardware, in Journey Inside the Computer, Ruby (and her readers!) will learn the basic elements of the machines that power our world. Then future kid coders can put their knowledge and imaginations to work with fun activities. Praise for Linda Liukas and the Hello Ruby series: "[Linda Liukas] wants kids to understand and embrace basic computer logic, so that they later formulate code in the same effortless and creative way they build structures with LEGO." —The Wall Street Journal "Hello Ruby by Linda Liukas is half picture book and half activity book rolled into one adorable package. What I love about it is that it introduces programming without requiring a computer at all." —GeekMom.com
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Hello Ruby: Expedition to the Internet
Written by Linda Liukas
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Welcome back to the world's most whimsical way to learn about technology and coding in Hello Ruby: Expedition to the Internet, as Linda Liukas, a programming superstar, teaches kids all about the internet through storytelling and imaginative activities. What exactly is the Internet? Is it a cloud? A network of wires? How does the information travel online? Learn all this and more with Ruby! In Ruby’s world anything is possible if you put your mind to it—even building the Internet out of snow! But before you can build something, you need to understand what it is and how it works. Join Ruby and her friends in their quest to build the most amazing Snow Internet ever, while learning real life facts along the way. Then, future kid coders can put their knowledge and imaginations to the test with the fun and creative exercises included in the activity book section.
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Baby Loves Coding
Written by Ruth Spiro & illustrated by Irene Chan
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-5
Big, brainy science for the littlest listeners Accurate enough to satisfy an expert, yet simple enough for baby, this clever board book showcases the use of logic, sequence, and patterns to solve problems. Can Baby think like a coder to fix her train? Beautiful, visually stimulating illustrations complement age-appropriate language to encourage baby's sense of wonder. Parents and caregivers may learn a thing or two, as well!
Honorable Mentions
My Life as a Youtuber book
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Team BFF book
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Hello Ruby: Adventures in Coding book
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  1. My Life as a Youtuber - Book 7 of the much-loved My Life series that has the irrepressible Derek Fallon starting his own Youtube web series! Derek Fallon finally found something to get excited about at school—an extracurricular class on making videos! Together with his friends Carly, Matt, and Umberto, Derek can’t wait to create his own Youtube web series. But he soon realizes Youtube stardom is a lot of work. On top of that, it’s time for his foster monkey Frank to go to monkey college so Derek must scramble to find a reason for Frank to stay with his family—if only a little while longer. Can Derek solve both problems at once? What if Frank became a part of Derek’s Youtube videos? Here’s another funny and thoughtful novel in the series that centers around most every tween today’s pastime—Youtube! A Christy Ottaviano Book

  2. Team BFF - After signing up for a “hackathon” day of coding, Sophia and her coding club friends welcome a robotics expert into their group, but find their teamwork challenged by conflicting opinions.

  3. Hello Ruby: Adventures in Coding - Meet Ruby—a small girl with a huge imagination, and the determination to solve any puzzle. As Ruby stomps around her world making new friends, including the Wise Snow Leopard, the Friendly Foxes, and the Messy Robots, kids will be introduced to the fundamentals of computational thinking, like how to break big problems into small ones, create step-by-step plans, look for patterns and think outside the box through storytelling. Then, these basic concepts at the core of coding and programming will be reinforced through fun playful exercises and activities that encourage exploration and creativity. In Ruby’s world anything is possible if you put your mind to it.

Books About Computers and Science

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Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Engineering
Written by Bob Cooper & illustrated by Greg Paprocki
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
An introductory primer for kids focusing on the "E" portion of "STEAM" engineering. With original Renaissance man Leonardo da Vinci as inspiration, this exciting new volume in the Little Leonardo series introduces kids to many of the different types of engineering they can aspire to. Littles will learn how nine types of engineers design and build all sorts of things, from the tiny microcircuitry in your smartphone to large projects like dams and bridges that transform the very face of the planet. Part of the Little Leonardo's Fascinating World Series. Greg Paprocki works full-time as an illustrator and book designer. He has illustrated several Curious George books, as well as the BabyLit alphabet books and The Big Book of Superheroes. Bob Cooper is a veteran editor whose twenty-year career has found him working on everything from comic books to art, architecture, and children's titles.
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Gabi's Fabulous Functions
Written by Caroline Karanja & illustrated by Ben William Whitehouse
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
Computer coding in the kitchen? Yes! Best friends Gabi and Adi are baking a special birthday treat-and making a recipe is a lot like creating a function in a computer code. These scientifically minded junior programmers are always on the lookout for ways to work coding concepts into their day with Code Play!
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Baby Code! Play
Written by Sandra Horning & illustrated by Melissa Crowton
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3
How do you explain coding in playtime to a baby? By showing how it’s all around them, and how they can take part in it, of course! By using items and experiences in a baby’s world, like an electric swing or a ride at the amusement park, this charming board book full of bright, colorful illustrations is the perfect introduction to coding in active play for babies and their caregivers–and is sure to leave them wanting to learn more!
Honorable Mentions
Alan Turing book
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Neural Networks for Babies book
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Quantum Computing for Babies book
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  1. Alan Turing - In this book from the critically acclaimed, multimillion-copy best-selling Little People, BIG DREAMS series, discover the life of Alan Turing, the genius code cracker and father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence. Alan grew up in England, where his best friends were numbers and a little boy called Christopher. When his young friend died, Alan retreated to the world of numbers and codes, where he discovered how to crack the code of the Nazi Enigma machine. This moving book features stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, including a biographical timeline with historical photos and a detailed profile of the brilliant mathematician’s life. Little People, BIG DREAMS is a best-selling series of books and educational games that explore the lives of outstanding people, from designers and artists to scientists and activists. All of them achieved incredible things, yet each began life as a child with a dream. This empowering series offers inspiring messages to children of all ages, in a range of formats. The board books are told in simple sentences, perfect for reading aloud to babies and toddlers. The hardcover versions present expanded stories for beginning readers. Boxed gift sets allow you to collect a selection of the books by theme. Paper dolls, learning cards, matching games, and other fun learning tools provide even more ways to make the lives of these role models accessible to children. Inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world with Little People, BIG DREAMS!

  2. Neural Networks for Babies - Neural Networks for Babies by Chris Ferrie is a colorfully simple introduction to the study of how machines and computing systems are created in a way that was inspired by the biological neural networks in animal and human brains. It is never too early to become a scientist! With scientific and mathematical information from an expert, this is the perfect book for enlightening the next generation of geniuses.

  3. Quantum Computing for Babies - Simple explanations of complex ideas for your future genius! Written by experts, Quantum Computing for Babies is a colorfully simple introduction to the magical world of quantum computers. Babies (and grownups!) will discover the difference between bits and qubits and how quantum computers will change our future. With a tongue-in-cheek approach that adults will love, this installment of the Baby University board book series is the perfect way to introduce basic concepts to even the youngest scientists. After all, it’s never too early to become a quantum physicist! Baby University: It only takes a small spark to ignite a child’s mind.

Books About Computers and Girls And Women

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Code It! Create It!
Written by Sarah Hutt & illustrated by Brenna Vaughan
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12
Girls can design the perfect coding-powered project for themselves in this informative, interactive book published in partnership with the nonprofit organization Girls Who Code that guides readers through the brainstorming process, provides inspiration, and teaches basic coding concepts. Illustrations. Consumable.
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Girls Who Code
Written by Reshma Saujani
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 10-14
Part how-to, part girl-empowerment, and all fun, from the leader of the movement championed by Sheryl Sandberg, Malala Yousafzai, and John Legend. Since 2012, the organization Girls Who Code has taught computing skills to and inspired over 40,000 girls across America. Now its founder, Reshma Saujani, wants to inspire you to be a girl who codes! Bursting with dynamic artwork, down-to-earth explanations of coding principles, and real-life stories of girls and women working at places like Pixar and NASA, this graphically animated book shows what a huge role computer science plays in our lives and how much fun it can be. No matter your interest—sports, the arts, baking, student government, social justice—coding can help you do what you love and make your dreams come true. Whether you’re a girl who’s never coded before, a girl who codes, or a parent raising one, this entertaining book, printed in bold two-color and featuring art on every page, will have you itching to create your own apps, games, and robots to make the world a better place.
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Who Says Women Can't Be Computer Programmers?
Written by Tanya Lee Stone & illustrated by Marjorie Priceman
picture book
Recommend Ages: 6-9
A picture book biography of Ada Lovelace, the woman recognized today as history’s first computer programmer—she imagined them 100 years before they existed! In the early nineteenth century lived Ada Byron: a young girl with a wild and wonderful imagination. The daughter of internationally acclaimed poet Lord Byron, Ada was tutored in science and mathematics from a very early age. But Ada’s imagination was never meant to be tamed and, armed with the fundamentals of math and engineering, she came into her own as a woman of ideas—equal parts mathematician and philosopher. From her whimsical beginnings as a gifted child to her most sophisticated notes on Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine, this book celebrates the woman recognized today as the first computer programmer. A Christy Ottaviano Book
Honorable Mentions
Baby Code! Music book
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Baby Code! Art book
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Baby Code! book
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  1. Baby Code! Music - It’s never too early to get little ones interested in computer coding with this unique series of board books! How do you explain coding in music to a baby? By showing how it’s all around them, and how they can take part in it, of course! By using experiences common in a baby’s world, like hearing a melody from a mobile or tapping on an electronic xylophone, this charming board book full of bright, colorful illustrations is the perfect introduction to coding in music for babies and their caregivers–and is sure to leave them wanting to learn more!

  2. Baby Code! Art - It’s never too early to get little ones interested in computer coding with this unique series of board books! How do you explain coding in art to a baby? By showing how it’s all around them, and how they can take part in it, of course! By using items in a baby’s world, like a camera or a block made from a 3D printer, this charming board book full of bright, colorful illustrations is the perfect introduction to coding in art for babies and their caregivers–and is sure to leave them wanting to learn more!

  3. Baby Code! - It’s never too early to get little ones interested in computer coding with this unique series of board books! How do you explain coding to a baby? By showing how it’s all around them, and how they can take part in it, of course! By using items common in a baby’s world, like a teddy bear and electric train, this charming board book full of bright, colorful illustrations is the perfect introduction to coding for babies and their caregivers—and is sure to leave them wanting to learn more!

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