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Dwellings: Books For Kids

Looking for a list of the best children's books about dwellings?

Children’s literature has many notable options when it comes to dwellings. To help you find the right books for you and your young reader, we’ve compiled a list of the best kids books about dwellings.

Our list includes board books, picture books, and chapter books. Board books are best for babies and toddlers from ages newborn to 2 or 3. Picture books are generally great options for toddlers and for preschool and kindergarten age children. Picture books are especially enjoyable for adults to read aloud with young kids. The chapter books on our list are generally best for elementary through early middle school age tween kids. You can filter to sort by the best book type for your kid.

When it comes to children’s stories about dwellings, there are a variety of titles. This list covers everything, from classics like The Little House to popular sellers like The Wolves in the Walls to some of our favorite hidden gems like House for Hermit Crab.

We hope this list of kids books about dwellings can be a helpful resource for parents, teachers, and others searching for a new book! As you explore the list, please comment below to let us know what books you would add.

Home
Written & illustrated by Carson Ellis
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

A picture book debut by the illustrator of The Composer Is Dead offers a whimsical tribute to the myriad possibilities of home, depicting homes in different real-world environments as well as fantastical settings.

Room for Bear
Written & illustrated by Ciara Gavin
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

A huggable picture-book debut about a bear who doesn’t quite fit—perfect for fans of Karma Wilson’s Bear Snores On and Philip C. Snead & Erin Stead’s Bear Has a Story to Tell.

When Bear wakes up one spring, he goes in search of a new home. And he thinks he’s found the perfect place. Unfortunately, things are a bit . . . snug.

Can five little ducks find room for one big bear in their home—and in their hearts? Ciara Gavin’s luminous picture-book debut explores the unconditional love of families in all their colors, shapes, and sizes.

The Little House
Written & illustrated by Virginia Lee Burton
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Seventy-five years ago, Virginia Lee Burton created the Little House, and since then generations of readers have been enchanted by the story of this happy home and her journey from the pleasures of nature to the bustling city, and back again.

TouchThinkLearn: Homes
Written & illustrated by Xavier Deneux
board book
Recommend Ages: 3-5

Featuring spreads with raised, shaped objects that fit into scooped cutouts on their opposite page, these new TouchThinkLearn books offer the youngest learners an opportunity to explore in a hands-on, multisensory way. Seeing the image, tracing its shape, saying its name—these modes of perception combine to stimulate understanding of essential concepts. Discover a polar bear by tracing its raised outline on one side, and the concave shape of its cozy den on the other! Related words on each spread offer a springboard for further conversation to encourage the language skills crucial to later successful learning. In a format unlike any other, these groundbreaking books translate abstract thought into tangible knowledge.

House for Hermit Crab
Written & illustrated by Eric Carle
board book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

Join Hermit Crab as he learns an important lesson about growing up: For every friend and adventure left behind, there are new ones just ahead!

  • The House in the Night - 2009 Caldecott Medal Winner A spare, patterned text and glowing pictures explore the origins of light that make a house a home in this Caldecott Medal-winning bedtime book for young children. Naming nighttime things that are both comforting and intriguing to preschoolers—a key, a bed, the moon—this timeless book illuminates a reassuring order to the universe.

  • Where Bear? - This beautifully illustrated, fun-to-read book will have kids everywhere asking the same question: “Where, bear?” Once there was a bear cub who lived with a little boy. But over time the bear cub grew . . . and grew . . . and GREW! And did things that bears do . . . and do . . . and DO! One day the boy looked at the bear and realized he was just too big and bearish to be living in a house. “I think it’s time we found you a new place to live where you can be bearish and big,” said the boy. “But where, bear?” So begins a delightful journey that reminds us that even when best friends are apart, they always stay together.

  • Quiet! - Sssh! Listen, what’s that noise? Each room in a house has different noises and in this book the text and visual clues help a child experience the home through sound, which will be familiar to those children who are blind or partially sighted.

  • Mabel and Sam at Home - At the new house, there were movers and shouting and boxes and blankets. There were many places a girl like Mabel and a boy like Sam could be tripped over or smooshed or trod upon. There was one safe place where they would not. And that is how Mabel became a Sea Captain. In this three-part picture book of moving house and imaginative play, Mabel and Sam sail the high seas of their new home; tour the intriguing museum of their living room; journey through outer space to the safety of their own beds; and discover how far afield—and how close to home—imagination can take them.

She Wanted to Be Haunted
Written by Marcus Ewert & illustrated by SUSIE GHAHREMANI
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-6

With whimsical, rhyming stanzas, She Wanted to be Haunted offers a delightful, lyrical twist on the ever-important question of how to be your very best self.

Clarissa the cottage is adorable . . . bright pink, with windows that wink, and flowers growing all around. But Clarissa doesn’t want to be adorable—being cute is boring.

Couldn’t she be like her father, a creepy castle home to vampires and crypts? Or like her mother, a witch’s hut full of spells and smells? If only she were haunted! Then she’d be less ordinary . . . What will it take for Clarissa to go from adorable to horrible?

Grandma's House
Written & illustrated by Alice Melvin
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7

Often, after school, a little girl goes to her grandmother’s house, where everything is always the same but, then again, different. One day, she puts her coat on the hook in the hall, pours a glass of milk for herself in the kitchen, and tries to reach the cookie jar on the highest shelf in the pantry. But where is Grandma? Children will love exploring the rooms in Grandma’s House, peering through its cutout pages from one room to the next and journeying high up into the foldout attic in search of Grandma. Highly detailed and intricately illustrated in Alice Melvin’s trademark style, Grandma’s House is another winner from one of today’s shining stars of illustration.

Two Homes
Written by Claire Masurel & illustrated by Kady MacDonald Denton
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

A young boy named Alex enjoys the homes of both of his parents who live apart but love Alex very much, in a comforting story about the reality of divorce. Reprint.

One House
Written by Sarah MacNeill
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3

Crabs with clipboards and bears who build are some of the animals who come together in One House to DIY a new home from start to finish for their friend. Plans are drafted, holes are dug, and construction begins! This board book will delight little ones with its quirky illustrations and rhyming countdown. With teamwork, generosity and some special skills, it’s amazing what these critters can accomplish!

If You Lived Here
Written & illustrated by Giles Laroche
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Features intricately detailed, bas-relief collage spreads of dwellings in other world regions and historical times to explain how different people live and have lived—from a village house in South Africa that tells the story of its family to a floating green house in the Netherlands. 20,000 first printing.

  • The One Day House - Wilson dreams of all the ways he can help improve his friend Gigi’s house so that she’ll be warm, comfortable, and happy. One day, friends and neighbors from all over come to help make Wilson’s plans come true. Everyone volunteers to pitch in to make Gigi’s house safe, clean, and pretty. Inspired by a friend’s volunteerism, author Julia Durango tells a story of community and togetherness, showing that by helping others we help ourselves. Further information about Labor of Love, United Way, and Habitat for Humanity is included at the end of the book.

  • Tony's Hard Work Day - Because no one will let him help renovate the family’s new country house, Tony builds one of his own.

  • The Wolves in the Walls - There are sneaking, creeping, crumpling noises coming from inside the walls. Lucy is sure there are wolves living in the walls of their house — and, as everybody says, if the wolves come out of the walls, it’s all over. Her family doesn’t believe her. Then one day, the wolves come out. But it’s not all over. Instead, Lucy’s battle with the wolves is only just beginning.

  • Building a House - Byron Barton, the celebrated creator of numerous picture books for very young children, including Trucks, My Bus, and My Car, builds a house, step by step, right before your eyes! A machine digs a big hole. A cement mixer pours cement. Carpenters put up walls. Bricklayers, electricians, plumbers, and painters do their part. Through brilliantly simple words and pictures a house is built.

Dave's Cave
Written & illustrated by Frann Preston-Gannon
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

Dave loves his cave. The inside is decorated exactly the way he likes it. But what if there’s a better cave out there? Dave needs to find out for himself. This humorous romp from a celebrated author-illustrator reminds readers that sometimes there’s no place like home. Full color.

Everyday House
Written & illustrated by Cynthia Rylant
picture book
Recommend Ages: 2-5

By award-winning author-illustrator Cynthia Rylant, Everyday House is a charming story about all of the things that make a house and fill up a home.

The Everyday House has a blue front door and a porch with a wide white swing. It has red and pink flowers and a small birdhouse and a bell with a ding-dong ring.

From award-winning author-illustrator Cynthia Rylant comes a charming story about all the special touches that make this Everyday House a home.

Ned's New Home
Written & illustrated by Kevin Tseng
Select type book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

When Ned’s apple begins to rot, he must search for a new house.

A pear isn’t quite right.

A watermelon isn’t perfect either.

A pile of blueberries? All wrong!

Will any other fruit make Ned feel at home again?

Little ones will love this happy story about finding the perfect place to call home.

House Held Up by Trees
Written by Ted Kooser & illustrated by Jon Klassen
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

When the house was new, not a single tree remained on its perfect lawn to give shade from the sun. The children in the house trailed the scent of wild trees to neighboring lots, where thick bushes offered up secret places to play. When the children grew up and moved away, their father, alone in the house, continued his battle against blowing seeds, plucking out sprouting trees. Until one day the father, too, moved away, and as the empty house began its decline, the trees began their approach. At once wistful and exhilarating, this lovely, lyrical story evokes the inexorable passage of time — and the awe-inspiring power of nature to lift us up.

Someplace Else
Written by Carol P. Saul & illustrated by Barry Root
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

Mrs. Tilby, who has lived in a white house by the apple orchard for her entire life, hops in her green Studebaker and searches for someplace else to live—the city, the seashore, even a riverboat.

  • The Maid and the Mouse and the Odd-Shaped House: A Story in Rhyme - An oddly-shaped house takes on the appearance of a cat as the maid and mouse who live there make various changes in it.

  • Possum and the Summer Storm - Possum looked out one summer afternoon. “Time to come in!” he called to his baby possums. “It looks like we’re in for some weather!” Possum calls his children out of the summer storm—but what can he do when their home is swept away by rising water? The possum family must rely on their friends to construct a new house. At first it seems that no other animal’s home is suited for a possum, but they come up with something spectacular! Beloved character Possum is back, along with an array of friends who make for a broad, ranging ensemble, giving children a tantalizing peek at how different animals build their homes.

  • Squeak the Mouse Likes His House - The illustrator of the best-selling Biscuit books has created an adorable mouse who inhabits a Borrowers-like world. To a tiny creature like Squeak, a sneaker can become a bed, a toy can become a vehicle, and a few crumbs can become a meal. Readers will be fascinated by the contrast in scale between the giant human world (inhabited by two unsuspecting children) and the diminutive mouse world. As an extra treat, there are fun mazes on the endpapers that follow Squeak’s adventure!

  • The House of Months and Years - A girl must stop the Boogeyman living in her home from stealing her family’s warmest memories in this haunting, atmospheric novel from the author of Flights and Chimes and Mysterious Times and The Accidental Afterlife of Thomas Marsden. When her distant aunt and uncle die, Amelia Howling is forced to move into their home when they leave her parents in charge of their children. Her parents assure her that it will be like having a grand adventure with three new siblings, but Amelia is not convinced. Luckily, the house is large, filled with nooks and crannies perfect for hiding from her cousins. But even with all the nooks and crannies, the rumbling and crumbling rooms are more sinister than they seem. The house was built years ago by a creature named Horatio, and he’s been waiting for the perfect human inhabitant: Amelia. Horatio has the power to travel through time and memories, and lures Amelia into his world. The memories of children, he told her, were the best, and Amelia agreed—her cousins were full of good memories. Until she noticed that once she and Horatio visited a memory, it was gone forever. And she had been stealing the good memories of her cousins and their parents without even noticing! Horrified and scared, Amelia lets her cousins in on her secret, and asks them for help. Together, they must race through time to recover their minds and break the perfect clockwork of the evil Calendar House.

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