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The Library: Books For Kids

Looking for a list of the best children's books about the library?

Julie Andrews said: “The world is full of magical places, and the library has always been one of them for me. A library can be that special place for our children.” A building full of books, any of which can be checked out, taken home, and read and re-read—how amazing is that? We love reading over here, and while we’re huge proponents of building your personal library (agreeing with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle that “It is a great thing to start life with a small number of really good books which are your very own.”), public libraries simply allow you access to that many more books, which is a powerful thing. In honor of libraries and they wonderful stewards the librarians, check out this list of some truly fantastic titles about libraries!

Planting Stories: The Life of Librarian and Storyteller Pura Belpré book
#1
Planting Stories: The Life of Librarian and Storyteller Pura Belpré
Written by Anika Denise and illustrated by Paola Escobar
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Thoughts from The Goodfather

This is a meaningful story of heritage, immigration, and carving a path for others to follow. I loved learning about Pura Belpré and her love of storytelling and work as a librarian. The inclusion of Spanish words that can be understood in context adds an authentic touch, and the illustrations are also very unique and bright.

An inspiring picture book biography of storyteller, puppeteer, and New York City’s first Puerto Rican librarian, who championed bilingual literature. When she came to America in 1921, Pura Belpré carried the cuentos folklóricos of her Puerto Rican homeland. Finding a new home at the New York Public Library as a bilingual assistant, she turned her popular retellings into libros and spread story seeds across the land. Today, these seeds have grown into a lush landscape as generations of children and storytellers continue to share her tales and celebrate Pura’s legacy. Brought to colorful life by Paola Escobar’s elegant and exuberant illustrations and Anika Aldamuy Denise’s lyrical text, this gorgeous book is perfect for the pioneers in your life. Informative backmatter and suggested further reading included.

Library Mouse #1 book
#2
Library Mouse #1
Written and illustrated by Daniel Kirk
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Sam, a shy but creative mouse who lives in a library, decides to write and illustrate his own stories which he places on the shelves with the other library books but when children find the tales, they all want to meet the author. 10,000 first printing.

Max and Bird book
#3
Max and Bird
Written and illustrated by Ed Vere
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-6

Max, a kitten, and Bird, a very young bird, want to be friends but Max also wants to eat Bird, so they strike a deal.

Madeline Finn and the Library Dog book
#4
Madeline Finn and the Library Dog
Written and illustrated by Lisa Papp
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Thoughts from The Book Snob Mom

Gorgeous illustrations to accompany this story of a little girl who struggles with reading despite her persistence. Encouraged by her teacher, mother and the librarian, she finally finds the perfect listener to practice on and gains the self-confidence she needs to get a coveted reading star. The story is sweet and beautiful and I love that Madeline discovers she loves to read in a very out of the box way!

Madeline Finn does NOT like to read. But she DOES want a gold star from her teacher. But, stars are for good readers. Stars are for understanding words, and for saying them out loud. Fortunately, Madeline Finn meets Bonnie, a library dog. Reading out loud to Bonnie isn’t so bad; when Madeline Finn gets stuck, Bonnie doesn’t mind. As it turns out, it’s fun to read when you’re not afraid of making mistakes. Bonnie teaches Madeline Finn that it’s okay to go slow. And to keep trying. With endearing illustrations, Lisa Papp brings an inspiring and comforting book to all new readers who just need a little confidence to overcome their fears.

Tinyville Town: I'm a Librarian book
#5
Tinyville Town: I'm a Librarian
Written and illustrated by Brian Biggs
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5

The Tinyville Town preschool series stacks up in a whole new way with the addition of the fourth volume, “I m a Librarian” the latest board book to feature one of the many diverse residents of the charming town. In “I m a Librarian,” readers get to know the town librarian as he helps a little boy find a favorite book. As the search progresses, fans of the series will recognize many other residents of Tinyville Town also visiting the library. From”New York Times”bestselling author and illustrator Brian Biggs, the Tinyville Town series launched in 2016 with three books: “Tinyville Town Gets to Work!, “a world-establishing picture book that introduces the town and its many residents, and two board books: “I m a Veterinarian”and”I m a Firefighter.”With a nod to the busy world of Richard Scarry and the neighborhood feel of “Sesame Street,” this new series is becoming a favorite among preschoolers and a staple of preschool classroom libraries.Set in a cozy community of kind, friendly people, the Tinyville Town books are idealfor story time and class discussions about occupations and community helpers. “

  1. If You Ever Want to Bring a Circus to the Library, Don't! - The third book in the bestselling MAGNOLIA SAYS DON’T! series is another loud and cautionary tale of what not to do—this time, at the library! If you see a poster that says “You Can Do Anything at the Library!”, it is NOT giving you permission to put on a circus! But Magnolia doesn’t see any problem with setting up her own big top. She’s got a lot of gusto and one mean human cannonball routine. So what if her greatest show on Earth won’t fit between bookshelves? Elise Parsley’s boldly expressive illustrations perfectly complement this mostly-librarian-approved guide on how to be everything BUT quiet in the library!

  2. Bunny's Book Club - The Book Snob Mom - This is an adorable book about a little rabbit who discovers the library and a love of reading and then introduces his friends to the fun as well. The illustrations are as sweet as the story, and the excitement the animals feel about reading is palpable! While borrowing books without permission isn’t a great idea, the librarian’s kind resolution is the perfect ending.

  3. Library Lion - When a lion comes to the library one day, no one is sure what to do. There are no rules about lions in the library. When something terrible happens, the lion quickly comes to the rescue in the only way he knows how.

  4. Ronan the Librarian - This humorous picture book from sister duo Tara Luebbe and Becky Cattie and illustrator Victoria Maderna follows Ronan the Barbarian as he he grows from being just a rough-and-tumble warrior to Ronan the Librarian—a rough-and-tumble warrior who loves books. Ronan was a mighty barbarian. He invaded. He raided. And back home, he traded. He always found the greatest treasures. Until one day, Ronan found something no barbarian wants: A BOOK. At first, his fellow barbarians are skeptical of his newfound passion for reading, but in the end, even they aren’t immune to the charms of a good book.

Miss Brooks Loves Books! book
#10
Miss Brooks Loves Books!
Written by Barbara Bottner and illustrated by Michael Emberley
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5

A first-grade girl who does not like to read stubbornly resists her school librarian’s efforts to convince her to love books until she finds one that might change her mind.

Construction book
#11
Construction
Written by Sally Sutton and illustrated by Brian Lovelock
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Big machines and their drivers work together to build a library.

The Story Seeker book
#12
The Story Seeker
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12

Viviani Fedeler, proud resident of the New York Public Library, has set her sights on becoming a star reporter. She’s thrilled when Miss Hutch announces a story contest where the winner gets their essay printed in The New York Times!

But when it’s time to write, Viviani is out of stories. As she struggles to find inspiration, the library is struck with a string of mysterious disappearances. Rare medical texts keep vanishing off the shelves, nowhere to be found! Will Viviani be able to return the books to their rightful shelves and find the perfect story to impress the Times?

The Story Seeker delivers an unforgettable mystery adventure set in the iconic New York Public Library during the Roaring Twenties.

Tomás and the Library Lady book
#13
Tomás and the Library Lady
Written by Pat Mora and illustrated by Raul Colon and Pat Mora
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

While helping his family in their work as migrant laborers far from their home, Tomas finds an entire world to explore in the books at the local public library.

Dreamers book
#14
Dreamers
Written and illustrated by Yuyi Morales
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Winner of the 2019 Pura Belpré Illustrator Award! A New York Times / New York Public Library Best Illustrated Book of 2018 In 1994, Yuyi Morales left her home in Xalapa, Mexico and came to the US with her infant son. She left behind nearly everything she owned, but she didn’t come empty-handed. She brought her strength, her work, her passion, her hopes and dreams. . . and her stories. Caldecott Honor artist and six-time Pura Belpré winner Yuyi Morales’s gorgeous picture book Dreamers is about making a home in a new place. Yuyi and her son Kelly’s passage was not easy, and Yuyi spoke no English whatsoever at the time. But together, they found an unexpected, unbelievable place: the public library. There, book by book, they untangled the language of this strange new land, and learned to make their home within it. Dreamers is a celebration of what migrantes bring with them when they leave their homes. It’s a story about family. And it’s a story to remind us that we are all dreamers, bringing our own gifts wherever we roam. Beautiful and powerful at any time but given particular urgency as the status of our own Dreamers becomes uncertain, this is a story that is both topical and timeless. The lyrical text is complemented by sumptuously detailed illustrations, rich in symbolism. Also included are a brief autobiographical essay about Yuyi’s own experience, a list of books that inspired her (and still do), and a description of the beautiful images, textures, and mementos she used to create this book. A parallel Spanish-language edition, Soñadores, is also available.

  1. Inkheart - Cornelia Funke, the enormously talented author of the international best-seller THE THIEF LORD, brings readers another spellbinding tale of adventure and magic. Meggie lives a quiet life alone with her father, a book-binder. But her father has a deep secret— he posseses an extraordinary magical power. One day a mysterious stranger arrives who seems linked to her father’s past. Who is this sinister character and what does he want? Suddenly Meggie is involved in a breathless game of escape and intrigue as her father’s life is put in danger. Will she be able to save him in time?

  2. The Library - Meet an unforgettable bibliophile Elizabeth Brown doesn’t like to play with dolls and she doesnt like to skate. What she does like to do is read books. Lots of books. The only problem is that her library has gotten so big she can’t even use her front door anymore. What should Elizabeth Brown do? Start her own public library, of course! With charming verse and watercolors Sarah Stewart and David Small celebrate one of America’s oldest and finest institutions. The Library is a 1995 New York Times Book Review Notable Children’s Book of the Year and Outstanding Book of the Year.

  3. That Book Woman - The Book Snob Mom - While to my understanding this is not based on one specific true story, it does honor the pack horse librarians as a special part of American history. David Small’s illustrations are lovely and I love the emphasis on facial expressions, particularly the little boy’s as his opinion of books changes from one of disgust and annoyance to true enjoyment as he witnesses the librarian’s commitment to bringing new books to his family come what may. The story is definitely on the longer side and may be geared towards a bit of an older audience, but it is beautifully written and provides an accessible glimpse into one small piece of isolated Appalachian life.

  4. The Boy who was Raised by Librarians - Melvin discovers that the public library is the place where he can find just about anything—including three librarians who help in his quest for knowledge.

Wild about Books book
#19
Wild about Books
Written by Judy Sierra and illustrated by Marc Brown
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

All the animals are very curious when a mobile library arrives but soon they can’t wait to learn about this new something called reading. They read thin books and fat books and Cat in the Hat books. Molly even found waterproof books for the otter, who never goes swimming without Harry Potter! Read along with the book-loving animals and go wild, simply wild, about wonderful books.

The Not So Quiet Library book
#20
The Not So Quiet Library
Written and illustrated by Zachariah OHora
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

It’s Saturday, which means Oskar and Theodore get to go to the library with their dad! It means donuts for breakfast! And it means endless quiet hours lost in stories. But on this not so quiet Saturday, Oskar and Teddy get a rude surprise when they’re interrupted by a five-headed, hangry monster! Will Oskar ever get to finish his book in peace? Will Teddy ever get to gorge on his donuts? Or might both of them hold the secret weapons to taming the beast?

Do Not Bring Your Dragon to the Library book
#21
Do Not Bring Your Dragon to the Library
Written by Julie Gassman and illustrated by Andy Elkerton
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm

I thought this book was cute and fun, but a little repetitive and long. The illustrations are great and I love that it talks about how fun the library can be with the reading time, singing time, and different books available. Plus, dragons are always a fun addition, in my opinion. :)

Have you ever thought about bringing your dragon to the library? Don’t do it! You might have the best intentions, but that dragon will cause nothing but trouble. Using rhyming text and a diverse cast of characters, this charming picture book will provide some important — and some not so important — library etiquette in a very entertaining way.

The Lonely Book book
#22
The Lonely Book
Written by Kate Bernheimer and illustrated by Chris Sheban
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm

A once-loved book becomes a little more lonely as it ages, becomes worn, and is read less often, but a certain girl finds it and discovers its magic! This story is sure to take you back to your own childhood and remind you of books you loved, maybe even ones you made sure you have in your own library now.

Once popular, an increasingly shabby library book grows lonely until a young girl rediscovers it, but when it becomes lost again, both the book and the girl wonder if they will have a happy ending. By the award-winning author of The Girl in the Castle Inside the Museum and the award-winning illustrator of Catching the Moon.

Miss Dorothy and Her Bookmobile book
#23
Miss Dorothy and Her Bookmobile
Written by Gloria Houston and illustrated by Susan Condie Lamb
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

When Dorothy was a young girl, she loved books, and she loved people, so she decided that she would become a librarian. Dorothy’s dearest wish is to be a librarian in a fine brick library just like the one she visited when she was small. But her new home in North Carolina has valleys and streams but no libraries, so Miss Dorothy and her neighbors decide to start a bookmobile. Instead of people coming to a fine brick library, Miss Dorothy can now bring the books to them—at school, on the farm, even once in the middle of a river! Miss Dorothy and Her Bookmobile is an inspiring story about the love of books, the power of perseverance, and how a librarian can change people’s lives.

  1. Waiting for the BiblioBurro - Ana loves stories. She often makes them up to help her little brother fall asleep. But in her small village there are only a few books and she has read them all. One morning, Ana wakes up to the clip-clop of hooves, and there before her, is the most wonderful sight: a traveling library resting on the backs of two burros‑all the books a little girl could dream of, with enough stories to encourage her to create one of her own. Inspired by the heroic efforts of real-life librarian Luis Soriano, award-winning picture book creators Monica Brown and John Parra introduce readers to the mobile library that journeys over mountains and through valleys to bring literacy and culture to rural Colombia, and to the children who wait for the BiblioBurro. A portion of the proceeds from sales of this book was donated to Luis Soriano’s BiblioBurro program.

  2. Margret & H.A. Rey's Curious George Visits the Library - Curious George is lucky to arrive at the library just in time for story hour, but it is not easy for a little monkey to sit still very long. Simultaneous. 58,000 first printing.

  3. Maisy Goes to the Library - Maisy likes going to the library. She loves to read a book in a nice, quiet place. Today, Maisy wants to read a book about fish, but she can only find books about birds or tigers. So she explores some of the other things to do in the library, like using the computer, making copies, listening to music, or looking at fish in the aquarium. Aha! Finally Maisy finds a sparkly book all about fish. But just as she settles into a corner to read, along come Cyril, Tallulah, Eddie, and Ostrich — and they all have noisier activities on their minds!

  4. The Librarian of Basra - Presents the true story of how Alia Baker, the librarian of the Basra library, and her friends managed to save the books of the library before the library was burned to the ground during the 2003 Iraq War.

Beatrice Doesn't Want to book
#28
Beatrice Doesn't Want to
Written by Laura Numeroff and illustrated by Lynn Munsinger
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

On the third afternoon of going to the library with her brother Henry, Beatrice finally finds something she enjoys doing.

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore book
#29
The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore
Written by William Joyce and illustrated by Joe Bluhm
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Morris Lessmore loves words, stories and books, and after a tornado carries him to another land, dreary and colorless, he finds a single book in color that leads him to an amazing library where, he learns, the books need him as much as he needs them.

Red Knit Cap Girl and the Reading Tree book
#30
Red Knit Cap Girl and the Reading Tree
Written and illustrated by Naoko Stoop
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Thoughts from The Book Snob Mom

For avid readers especially, this story about building a little community library is charming, with everyone bringing a little something of themselves to share. The illustrations are lovely and feel calm and soothing.

This new adventure with Red Knit Cap Girl and her friends uses simple prose and radiant illustrations to shine a light on the joy of reading and the importance of working together. One day Red Knit Cap Girl and her friends discover a hollow tree in the middle of the forest. What can be done with one ordinary tree? “I will keep my book in this nook so everyone can read it,” Red Knit Cap Girl says. But the tree isn’t only for books. Little by little, one by one, the animals share their unique gifts and turn the ordinary tree into a special spot for everyone to enjoy!

Library on Wheels book
#31
Library on Wheels
Written and illustrated by Sharlee Glenn
picture book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

If you can’t bring the man to the books, bring the books to the man. Mary Lemist Titcomb (1852-1932) was always looking for ways to improve her library. As librarian at the Washington County Free Library in Maryland, Titcomb was concerned that the library was not reaching all the people it could. She was determined that everyone should have access to the library—not just adults and those who lived in town. Realizing its limitations and inability to reach the county’s 25,000 rural residents, including farmers and their families, Titcomb set about to change the library system forever with the introduction of book-deposit stations throughout the country, a children’s room in the library, and her most revolutionary idea of all—a horse-drawn Book Wagon. Soon book wagons were appearing in other parts of the country, and by 1922, the book wagon idea had received widespread support. The bookmobile was born!

Bats at the Library book
#32
Bats at the Library
Written and illustrated by Brian Lies
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
Thoughts from The Book Snob Mom

This was a fun and different take on a visit to the library… by a group of bats just delighted that the library window has been left open at night. The illustrations are filled with lots of fun details (like the bats hanging upside down for storytime to be read an upside down book!) that add humor and extra movement to the story. My favorite part of this book is the bats palpable excitement to be able to spend time in the library, and how while the bats new to the library initially just want to goof off, they soon discover the delights of books in the library and learn it’s true joy.

Houghton Mifflin Company Another inky evening’s here— The air is cool and calm and clear. Can it be true? Oh, can it be? Yes!—Bat Night at the library!

  1. A Kind of Paradise - Read the book that Ali Standish (author of The Ethan I Was Before) calls “a heartwarming story” and Melissa Roske (author of Kat Greene Comes Clean) calls “a joyful, heartfelt debut!” Thirteen-year-old Jamie Bunn made a mistake at the end of the school year. A big one. And every kid in her middle school knows all about it. Now she has to spend her summer vacation volunteering at the local library—as punishment. What a waste of a summer! Or so she thinks. A Kind of Paradise is an unforgettable story about the power of community, the power of the library, and the power of forgiveness.

  2. Otto the Book Bear - Otto lives in a book and is happiest when his story is being read. But Otto has a secret: when no one is looking and the mood strikes, Otto walks right off of his book’s pages! Full color.

  3. The Library Dragon - Sunrise Elementary School has a BIG problem. Their new librarian, Miss Lotta Scales, is a real dragon. When Sunrise Elementary School advertised for a thick-skinned librarian with a burning love of books, Miss Lotta Scales knew she was perfect for the job. Who could guard books better than a REAL dragon? But when she won’t let any of the children take a book from the shelves, the teachers form a delegation. Not even sweet Miss Lemon can convince Miss Lotta Scales that “the library belongs to the children.”Fortunately, when nearsighted Molly Brickmeyer stumbles onto a copy of Snuff the Magic Dragon and reads the tale out loud, her storytelling beckons the children back to the library and brings them face to face with the Library Dragon. Can an open book temper the flames of the school’s hotheaded librarian? This humorous tale by New York Times best-selling author – Carmen Agra Deedy – is paired with Michael P. White’s lively illustrations for an entertaining story about the power and importance of books for both children and adults.

  4. Lola at the Library - Every Tuesday Lola and her mother visit their local library to return and check out books, attend story readings, and share a special treat.

Wolves book
#37
Wolves
Written and illustrated by Emily Gravett
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

When a young rabbit checks out a library book about wolves, he learns much more about their behavior than he wanted to know, in a dramatic and witty story with two surprise endings.

Dewey: There's a Cat in the Library! book
#38
Dewey: There's a Cat in the Library!
Written by Vicki Myron and illustrated by Brett Witter and Steve James
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5

The story of Dewey the celebrated library cat is now available for the youngest of readers in this new, fully-illustrated picture book adventure. When Librarian Vicki Myron finds a young kitten abandoned in the Spencer Library return box, she nurses him back to health, deciding then and there that he will be their library cat, and naming him, appropriately, Dewey Readmore Books. Dewey loves his new home, but once he discovers the littlest library visitors-who like to chase him, pull his tail, and squeeze him extra tight-Dewey begins to wonder if he’s truly cut out for the demands of his new job. In the end, he is triumphant as he realizes that helping people big and small is what he is meant to do, and that by sharing his special brand of Dewey love, he can be the best library cat of all.

Froggy Goes to the Library book
#39
Froggy Goes to the Library
Written by Jonathan London and illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5

Froggy loves the library!

When Froggy and Mom and Pollywogilina set out for the library, Froggy brings a wheelbarrow to hold all the books he plans to borrow. There are so many to choose from: Dinosaur books! Books about Space Frog! Froggy is so excited that he forgets to use his indoor voice.

Readers enjoy Froggy’s antics, and so does Miss Otterbottom, the librarian. “Come again soon, Froggy,” she says.

The Fantastic Library Rescue and Other Major Plot Twists book
#40
The Fantastic Library Rescue and Other Major Plot Twists
Written and illustrated by Deborah Lytton
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Ruby Starr’s life is totally back on track. Her lunchtime book club, the Unicorns, is better than ever. And she and Charlotte, her once archnemesis, are now really good friends. The only thing she’s really worried about is an upcoming poetry assignment. She’s a reader, not a poet! Then, disaster strikes when Ruby learns that her most favorite place in the world, the school library, is in financial trouble. Ruby knows she and her friends have to do something to help. She has to find a way to save the day before the story ends in disaster.

Isabella, Star of the Story book
#41
Isabella, Star of the Story
Written by Jennifer Fosberry and illustrated by Mike Litwin
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Every day is an adventure with Isabella!

An everyday visit to the library becomes an unexpected adventure through the pages of classic children’s book favorites! Like Goldilocks, Isabella searches for a book that is juuust right.

Should she host a silly tea party in Wonderland with the Mad Hatter? Take a Technicolor trip through Oz with the Cowardly Lion? Or have a swashbuckling good time with the Lost Boys?

Join Isabella as she imagines herself in the starring role of these beloved stories and discovers the extraordinary power of reading. Anything is possible between the pages of a good book

  1. Lost in the Library - Steadfast Fortitude and curious Patience are waiting every morning to greet visitors of the Library. That is until, one early morning, when Fortitude finds Patience is missing. The city is about to awake, and the lions absolutely must be in their places before the sun rises. Now, Fortitude must abandon his own post to find his best friend in the Library’s labyrinthine halls. With Josh Funk’s clever rhymes and Stevie Lewis’ vibrant art, Lost in the Library introduces young readers to a pair of unforgettable lions, as well as the famed New York Public Library, and includes bonus material loaded with facts about Patience, Fortitude, and the NYPL’s history.

  2. Escape from Mr. Lemoncello's Library - “Twelve-year-old Kyle gets to stay overnight in the new town library, designed by his hero (the famous gamemaker Luigi Lemoncello), with other students but finds that come morning he must work with friends to solve puzzles in order to escape”—

  3. Library Lil - A formidable librarian makes readers not only out of the once resistant residents of her small town, but out of a tough-talking, television-watching motorcycle gang as well. An ALA Notable Book. Reprint.

  4. Schomburg: the Man Who Built a Library - In luminous paintings and arresting poems, two of children’s literature’s top African-American scholars track Arturo Schomburg’s quest to correct history. Where is our historian to give us our side? Arturo asked. Amid the scholars, poets, authors, and artists of the Harlem Renaissance stood an Afro–Puerto Rican named Arturo Schomburg. This law clerk’s life’s passion was to collect books, letters, music, and art from Africa and the African diaspora and bring to light the achievements of people of African descent through the ages. When Schomburg’s collection became so big it began to overflow his house (and his wife threatened to mutiny), he turned to the New York Public Library, where he created and curated a collection that was the cornerstone of a new Negro Division. A century later, his groundbreaking collection, known as the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, has become a beacon to scholars all over the world.

Story Thieves book
#46
Story Thieves
Written and illustrated by James Riley
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Except for reading the Kiel Gnomenfoot magic adventure series, Owen’s life is boring until he sees his classmate Bethany climb out of a book in the library. Bethany is half-fictional and has been searching every book she can find for her missing father, a fictional character.

The Night Library book
#47
The Night Library
Written by David Zeltser and illustrated by Raul Colon
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

The Polar Express meets The Night at the Museum in this fantastical picture-book adventure about the magic of books and libraries, perfect for book lovers of all ages! After a young boy goes to sleep upset that he’s getting a book for his birthday, he’s visited in the night by Patience and Fortitude, the two stone lions who guard the New York Public Library. Soon, he’s magically whisked away from his cozy home in the Bronx, and the two mighty lions show him the wonder of the library. There, the inquisitive Latino boy discovers the power of books and their role not only in his own life, but also in the lives of the people he loves. Raul Colon’s gorgeous, rich art creates an immersive world in this book about books, which is sure to capture the imaginations of kids and adults and inspire them to grab their library cards and dive into the worlds of stories.

Book! Book! Book! book
#48
Book! Book! Book!
Written by Deborah Bruss and illustrated by Tiphanie Beeke
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

When the children go back to school, the animals on the farm are bored, so they go into the library in town trying to find something to do.

Stella Louella's Runaway Book book
#49
Stella Louella's Runaway Book
Written and illustrated by Lisa Campbell Ernst
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

As she tries to find the book that she must return to the library that day, Stella gathers a growing group of people who have all enjoyed reading the book.

Rebel in the Library of Ever book
#50
Rebel in the Library of Ever
Written and illustrated by Zeno Alexander
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

The follow-up to our acclaimed middle-grade fantasy The Library of Ever features a dangerous takeover of the magical Library as our heroine fights to make knowledge free for everyone.

Lenora returns to the magical Library—which holds every book ever known on its shelves. But she discovers the Library is under new management, its incredible rooms and corridors turned sinister and oppressive.

Lenora quickly connects with a secret resistance that’s trying to free knowledge from the darkness threatening it. Her new friends introduce her to an ancient lost city, hang-gliding, and mathematical beings larger than the universe itself.

In its starred review for The Library of Ever, Kirkus called it “unusually clever,” BCCB named it “utterly enchanting,” and Booklist said it’s “for every person who has ever believed that libraries are magic.” Now Lenora returns to fight to prove that knowledge is always more powerful than ignorance and fear.

  1. Find Spot at the Library - There’s a costume party at the library! Spot wants to dress up as his favorite character. Can you find Spot now that he’s in costume? Join Spot and all his friends as they read books in the library and think about their favorite books and characters. With all the humor that made Where’s Spot? a children’s classic, the engaging lift-the-flap format, and a lovely celebration of reading and books, this is sure to be another favorite Spot adventure.

  2. Please Bury Me in the Library - A joyful celebration of books, reading, and all things literary is presented through an amusing collection of poems from the author of Scien-Trickery, and is enhanced with full-color illustrations from a debut artist.

  3. The Library of Ever - The Library of Ever is an instant classic for middle grade readers and booklovers everywhere—an adventure across time and space, as a young girl becomes a warrior for the forces of knowledge. With her parents off traveling the globe, Lenora is bored, bored, bored—until she discovers a secret doorway into the ultimate library. Mazelike and reality-bending, the library contains all the universe’s wisdom. Every book ever written, and every fact ever known, can be found within its walls. And Lenora becomes its newly appointed Fourth Assistant Apprentice Librarian. She rockets to the stars, travels to a future filled with robots, and faces down a dark nothingness that wants to destroy all knowledge. To save the library, Lenora will have to test her limits and uncover secrets hidden among its shelves. An Imprint Book

  4. Where Are My Books? - A boy investigates a squirrelly situation to track down his missing stories in this charming ode to book lovers of all kinds. Spencer loves to read. He reads a book every night. But one morning his favorite book goes missing, and in its place is a tulip. Spencer searches high and low, but he can’t find his book. The next morning another book is missing, a nut in its place. And the morning after that, another book is missing. What is happening to Spencer’s books? When he finds out, Spencer devises a surprising solution that will delight readers (and librarians) everywhere.

Chicken Story Time book
#55
Chicken Story Time
Written by Sandy Asher and illustrated by Mark Fearing
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5

A wonderfully silly take on library story time that’s perfect for children, chickens, and everyone in between

Why did the chicken cross the road? To get to story time at the library, of course! The children like the chicken, the chicken likes the children, and everyone loves story time. So it’s no surprise that more children (and more chickens!) get in on the fun until there are more kids and critters than the librarian knows what to do with. Luckily, she comes up with a creative solution and manages to find little R & R for herself.

Fans of Bats in the Library and Library Lion will fall in love and story time will never be the same!

But Excuse Me that is My Book book
#56
But Excuse Me that is My Book
Written and illustrated by Lauren Child
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

When Lola’s favorite book is not on the library’s shelf, her older brother, Charlie, tries to find another book she will enjoy.

The New LiBEARian book
#57
The New LiBEARian
Written by Alison Donald and illustrated by Alex Willmore
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-8

It’s storytime at the library but Miss Merryweather, the librarian, is missing! Dee and her friends go in search of her but instead find a rather hairy, new librarian! This debut book by Alison Donald and Alex Willmore is a fantastic mix of nostalgic and modern at the same time. With a little bit of magic thrown in, this book is sure to please both book and bear lovers!

Einstein the Class Hamster Saves the Library book
#58
Einstein the Class Hamster Saves the Library
Written by Janet Tashjian and illustrated by Jake Tashjian
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 7-10

With the school library in danger of closing, it’s up to one classroom pet and his friends to save the day. It’s another day at Boerring Elementary, and Einstein the class hamster, lover of fun facts, is getting ready for his game show when in walks Principal Decker with some bad news. Due to severe budget cuts, the school library will be closed for the rest of the year. How is this possible? The library is the heart of the school! Einstein is determined to find a way to save the library. With the help of Marlon the turtle, his friend Ned, and Ms. Moreno’s entire class, plans are put in motion! Janet and Jake Tashjian are back with another winning story starring the lovable walking encyclopedia, Einstein the class hamster. Full of quirky humor from a talking animal with lots of personality, this illustrated chapter book will have reluctant readers laughing and asking for more of Einstein’s zany adventures. This title has Common Core connections. Titles in the Einstein the Class Hamster series: Einstein the Class Hamster Einstein the Class Hamster and the Very Real Game Show Einstein the Class Hamster Saves the Library More from Janet Tashjian: The Sticker Girl series: Sticker Girl Sticker Girl Rules the School The My Life series: My Life as a Book My Life as a Stuntboy My Life as a Cartoonist My Life as a Joke My Life as a Gamer My Life as a Ninja My Life as a Youtuber The Marty Frye, Private Eye series: Marty Frye, Private Eye: The Case of Stolen Poodle Marty Frye, Private Eye: The Case of the Missing Action Figure

    Did you enjoy our children's book recommendations? Did we miss one of your favorites? Let us know in the comments below!