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Goats: Books For Kids

Looking for a list of the best children's books about goats?

Children’s literature has many notable options when it comes to goats. To help you find the right books for you and your young reader, we’ve compiled a list of the best kids books about goats.

Our list includes board books, picture books, and chapter books. Board books are best for babies and toddlers from ages newborn to 2 or 3. Picture books are generally great options for toddlers and for preschool and kindergarten age children. Picture books are especially enjoyable for adults to read aloud with young kids. The chapter books on our list are generally best for elementary through early middle school age tween kids. You can filter to sort by the best book type for your kid.

When it comes to children’s stories about goats, there are a variety of titles. This list covers everything, from classics like Salamatu and Kandoni Go Missing to popular sellers like Unicorn Thinks He’s Pretty Great to some of our favorite hidden gems like Gregory, the Terrible Eater.

We hope this list of kids books about goats can be a helpful resource for parents, teachers, and others searching for a new book! As you explore the list, please comment below to let us know what books you would add.

Goat's Coat
Written by Tom Percival & illustrated by Christine Pym
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-6

This charmingly illustrated rhyming picture book about Alfonzo, a goat with a very special coat, celebrates the power of kindness and friendship. Let me tell you the tale of Alfonzo the goat, who was terribly proud of his lovely new coat. Alfonzo was happy; he pranced and he skipped. Then he heard a sad noise, croaking out of a ditch. Alfonzo couldn’t be happier. He just got an amazing new coat, and he feels like a million dollars. But when he discovers some creatures in need of help, will Alfonzo be able to give up his treasured possession to save the day? This great big hug of a book shows that kindness is definitely the best recipe. Awards for Tom Percival Herman’s Letter—A Kids’ Indie Next List Pick

Gregory, the Terrible Eater
Written by Mitchell Sharmat & illustrated by Jose Aruego and Ariane Dewey
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

Gregory, the Terrible Eater, wants orange juice and eggs for breakfast. His parents are terribly upset! Why can’t Gregory eat striped ties and violins, like the rest of the goats? Jose Aruego and Ariane Dewey have entered into the spirit of Mitchell Sharmat’s upside-down, turned-around world with bold, wacky, expressive illustrations. The trio’s exuberant collaboration provokes healthy laughter and even includes a colorful chart which gives fresh meaning to the concept of “junk food.”

Through with the Zoo
Written & illustrated by Jacob Grant
picture book
Recommend Ages: 2-6

Goat has always dreamed of having his very own space. But Goat lives in a petting zoo, surrounded by hugs and rubs and grabby little hands. Determined to find his perfect alone space, Goat escapes into the big zoo. But space is not an easy thing to find, in this humorous picture book from Jacob Grant, Through with the Zoo.

A Unicorn Named Sparkle
Written & illustrated by Amy Young
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-6

When Lucy sees an ad in the newspaper for a unicorn, she sends in her twenty-five cents and waits four to six long weeks for her very own unicorn to arrive. She imagines the flowers that she’ll braid into his beautiful pink mane, and she even picks the perfect name for him: Sparkle. But when Sparkle arrives, his ears are too long, his horn is too short, he smells funny—and oh, he has fleas. Lucy isn’t pleased, but in the end she warms up to Sparkle and realizes that even though he wasn’t exactly the unicorn she wanted, he might be just the one she needs.

This Way, Charlie
Written by Caron Levis & illustrated by Charles Santoso
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

From the award-winning team behind Ida, Always comes a story about a friendship that grows between a blind horse and a gruff goat

All the animals at the Open Bud Ranch can see that Jack likes keeping his space to himself. But when Charlie arrives, he doesn’t see Jack at all. He’s still getting used to seeing out of only one of his eyes.

The two get off to a bumpy start. At first, Jack is anxious and distrustful. But one day, he summons his courage and guides Charlie to his favorite sunlit field: this way, Charlie. And so begins a powerful friendship that will be tested by life’s storms—but will ultimately change each life for the better.

  • Beatrice's Goat - More than anything, Beatrice longs to be a schoolgirl. But in her small African village, only children who can afford uniforms and books can go to school. Beatrice knows that with six children to care for, her family is much too poor. But then Beatrice receives a wonderful gift from some people far away — a goat! Fat and sleek as a ripe mango, Mugisa (which means “luck”) gives milk that Beatrice can sell. With Mugisa’s help, it looks as if Beatrice’s dream may come true after all. Page McBrier and Lori Lohstoeter beautifully recount this true story about how one child, given the right tools, is able to lift her family out of poverty. Thanks to Heifer Project International — a charitable organization that donates livestock to poor communities around the world — other families like Beatrice’s will also have a chance to change their lives.

  • Llama Llama and the Bully Goat - Llama Llama likes to sing. Gilroy laughs at everything. Llama sings out just the same. Gilroy says a not-nice name. Teacher has some things to say: calling names is not OK. Llama Llama is learning lots of new things at school and making many friends. But when Gilroy Goat starts teasing him and some of their classmates, Llama Llama isn’t sure what to do. And then he remembers what his teacher told him—walk away and tell someone. It works! But then Llama Llama feels badly. Can he and Gilroy try to be friends again?

  • The Three Billy Goats Gruff - A classic read-aloud favorite addressing bullying retold by acclaimed artist Jerry Pinkney. Jerry Pinkney puts his indelible stamp on another beloved folktale in the same vein as the Caldecott Medal-winning The Lion & the Mouse and the highly acclaimed The Tortoise & the Hare and The Grasshopper & the Ants. When the three billy goats Gruff are hungry, they see bountiful grass to eat across an old bridge. But the bridge is home to a terrible troll, who is peckish himself, and looking for a tasty morsel to gobble up. In his interpretation of the timeless tale, Jerry Pinkney shows there’s little good to come from greed—but in the end, redemption for even the most trollish bully is possible. A dramatic gatefold heightens the climax of this brilliant rendition.

  • A Unicorn Named Sparkle and the Pumpkin Monster - The fourth book in the A Unicorn Named Sparkle series features pumpkins, silly adventures, and of course, a sparkly friendship ― perfect for Autumn! Lucy and our favorite unicorn are back in Sparkle the Unicorn and the Pumpkin Monster. Lucy and Sparkle love Halloween, especially at Frank’s Pumpkin Farm. They get to run through corn mazes, play games, decorate pumpkins, and most importantly: eat a lot of cider donuts. But Lucy and Sparkle discover one big difference between them ― Lucy loves to be scared every once in awhile. Sparkle? Not so much. When Lucy takes the scary part of Halloween one step too far for Sparkle, she must comfort her frightened unicorn pal ― and win back his trust.

Polly and Her Duck Costume
Written by Leanne Laurciella & illustrated by Jill Howarth
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-6

Polly and Her Duck Costume tells the true story of Polly, a little blind goat who was rescued by Leanne Lauricella, rescuer of farmyard animals and founder of the immensely popular Instagram account The Goats of Anarchy. Polly has some trouble adapting to her new life until her new mom gives her a warm and fuzzy duck costume, which turns out to be the perfect fit! Follow along with Polly as she finds love with her new family, gains confidence, and makes new friends. The perfect tale to inspire and delight animal lovers, Polly and Her Duck Costume pairs beautiful illustrations with a truly heartwarming tale readers of all ages will adore.

Salamatu and Kandoni Go Missing
Written by Steve Brace & illustrated by Annie Kubler
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

Salamatu’s goat follows her to school, leading to a series of misadventures. Provides an insight into life in Ghana and allows comparisons to our own country. Published in conjunction with Action Aid.

The Chupacabra Ate the Candelabra
Written by Marc Tyler Nobleman & illustrated by Ana Aranda
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

With its hilarious dialogue, trio of bumbling goats, and fantastically zany villain, this unique, laugh-out-loud story based on a legendary monster is sure to crack up kids and grown-ups alike.

Like most goats, Jayna, Bumsie, and Pep’s greatest fear is being eaten for dinner by the legendary chupacabra—it’s common knowledge that goats are a chupacabra’s favorite food! One night, tired of living in fear, the impetuous goats whip out their trusty candelabra and head off to find the beast and scare it away before it can find them. Little do they know that candelabras are the chupacabra’s third-favorite food . . . and he isn’t about to stop there. This chupacabra has quite the appetite, and the goats are in for a big surprise!

Unicorn Thinks He's Pretty Great
Written & illustrated by Bob Shea
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-6

Ever since Unicorn moved into the neighborhood, Goat has been feeling out of sorts. Goat thought his bike was cool-until he saw that Unicorn could fly to school! Goat made marshmallow squares that almost came out right, but Unicorn made it rain cupcakes! Unicorn is such a show-off, how can Goat compete? When Goat and Unicorn share a piece of pizza, Goat learns that being a unicorn might not be all it’s cracked up to be. And when Unicorn shows his admiration for Goat, it looks like the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

El Chupacabras
Written by Adam Rubin & illustrated by Crash McCreery
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

A long time ago, a girl named Carla lived on a goat farm with her father, Hector. One night, a goat disappeared from the farm and turned up flat as a pancake. Only one creature could do that–El Chupacabras, the goatsucker! Legend has it that El Chupacabras is a fearsome beast, but you can’t believe everything you hear…and sometimes the truth is even more interesting.

  • How to Knit a Monster - Greta the goat is a wonderfully accomplished knitter. She can even knit little goats and turn them loose to play around her feet. But when she gets distracted from her knitting, threatening creatures spring from her needles, each more menacing than the last. It takes quick thinking, courage, and brilliant knitting for Greta to find her way out of a perilous situation. In this whimsical story, creativity and craft empower our heroine to restore her safety . . . as long as she pays attention to what is growing on her knitting needles!

  • How Do You Do? - Water Buffalo and Crane’s field is dry, empty, and hot—so hot that they can barely think of anything else. Every day is the same . . . Until one day, they hear something new. “How do you do?” When Goat dances into their lives, Water Buffalo and Crane can’t help but join in. Suddenly their field doesn’t seem dry, empty, and hot at all. Even after Goat dances away, their world is no longer so small. This beautiful story about widening your horizons and making new friends, brought to life with stunning illustrations by Gianna Marino, shows how all it takes is one special friend to change your world.

  • The Greedy Goat - A very greedy goat wreaks havoc in the barnyard in an entertaining cautionary tale from Petr Horcek. Goat is tired of always eating herbs and grass. She wants to try something new! So one day she embarks on a tasting spree, trying the dog’s food, the pig’s potato peels, and more, with the farmer’s underpants topping off a massive meal. Pretty soon, everyone else around the farm starts to notice that certain things have gone missing — including a now elusive Goat herself. It turns out that all that adventurous eating has left her feeling quite ill, prompting a recovery that plays out with a nod to another (very hungry) children’s favorite: “On Monday, her eyes stopped rolling. On Tuesday, her tummy stopped rumbling. . . .” After Goat is finally feeling like herself again, surely she’ll have learned her lesson. Won’t she?

  • Inspector Flytrap - Hoping to become the greatest detective that ever grew, Inspector Flytrap, a Venus flytrap, and his assistant, Nina the Goat, investigate “big deal” mysteries at an art museum, a cookie shop, and a garden.

A New Friend for Sparkle
Written & illustrated by Amy Young
board book
Recommend Ages: 4-7

A picture book starring Sparkle and Lucy about what happens when your best friend makes a new pal.

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