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Grief: Books For Kids

This list of the best kids books about grief is sure to include a new favorite for the voracious young reader in your life!

The Rough Patch book
#1
The Rough Patch
Written and illustrated by Brian Lies
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Evan and his dog do everything together. They play and read and eat. But mostly you will find them tending to Evan’s extraordinary garden, where flowers and other good things flourish and reach for the sky. But friends don’t always stay forever, and when Evan loses his, he destroys the place that meant the most to them, and creates something to match his mood. Something ugly and twisted, sad and stubborn, ragged and rough—and he likes it that way. Until one day . . . New York Times–bestselling author Brian Lies has created a breathtakingly beautiful and luminescent book about loss and grief, love and hope, and the healing power of friendship, curiosity, and nature.

Hope for Haiti book
#2
Hope for Haiti
Written and illustrated by Jesse Joshua Watson
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

A young boy finds hope when he is given an old soccer ball to play with in the wake of Haiti's devastating earthquake.

The Phone Booth in Mr. Hirota's Garden book
#3
The Phone Booth in Mr. Hirota's Garden
Written by Heather Smith and illustrated by Rachel Wada, Heather Smith
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

When the tsunami destroyed Makio’s village, Makio lost his father...and his voice. The entire village is silenced by grief, and the young child’s anger at the ocean grows. Then one day his neighbor, Mr. Hirota, begins a mysterious project—building a phone booth in his garden. At first Makio is puzzled; the phone isn’t connected to anything. It just sits there, unable to ring. But as more and more villagers are drawn to the phone booth, its purpose becomes clear to Makio: the disconnected phone is connecting people to their lost loved ones. Makio calls to the sea to return what it has taken from him and ultimately finds his voice and solace in a phone that carries words on the wind. Inspired by the true story of the wind phone in Otsuchi, Japan, following the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in 2011.

    Did you enjoy our children's book recommendations? Did we miss one of your favorites? Let us know in the comments below!