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Letter Writing: Books For Kids

Looking for a list of the best kids books about letter writing?

Children’s literature has many notable options when it comes to letter writing. To help you find the right books for you and your young reader, we’ve compiled a list of the best kids books about letter writing.

Our list includes picture books and chapter books. Picture books are generally great options for toddlers and for preschool and kindergarten age children. Picture books are especially enjoyable for adults to read aloud with young kids. The chapter books on our list are generally best for elementary through early middle school age tween kids. You can filter to sort by the best book type for your kid, and you can also use our table of contents to jump to particular topics you think your kid will enjoy.

When it comes to children’s stories about letter writing, there are a variety of titles. This list covers everything, from classics like Dear Yeti to popular sellers like When You Reach Me to some of our favorite hidden gems like The Day the Crayons Quit.

We hope this list of kids books about letter writing can be a helpful resource for parents, teachers, and others searching for a new book! As you explore the list, please comment below to let us know what books you would add.

Top 10 Books About Letter Writing

#1
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The Little I Who Lost His Dot
Written by Kimberlee Gard & illustrated by Sandie Sonke
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-6
Little i can't wait to meet his friends at school, but there's just one problem: he can't find his dot anywhere? Each letter offers a replacement--an acorn from Little a, a balloon from Little b, a clock from Little c--but nothing seems quite right. Adorable illustrations teach alphabet letters and sounds with a surprising and satisfying ending to Little i's search.
#2
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The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles
Written by Michelle Cuevas & illustrated by Erin E. Stead
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
A message in a bottle holds the promise of surprise and wonder, as told in this enthralling picture book by Caldecott Medalist Erin E. Stead The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles, who lives alone atop a hill, has a job of the utmost importance. It is his task to open any bottles found at sea and make sure that the messages are delivered. He loves his job, though he has always wished that, someday, one of the letters would be addressed to him. One day he opens a party invitation—but there’s no name attached. As he devotes himself to the mystery of the intended recipient, he ends up finding something even more special: the possibility of new friends.
#3
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I Wanna Iguana
Written by Karen Kaufman Orloff & illustrated by David Catrow
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Alex just has to convince his mom to let him have an iguana, so he puts his arguments in writing. He promises that she won't have to feed it or clean its cage or even see it if she doesn't want to. Of course Mom imagines life with a six-foot-long iguana eating them out of house and home. Alex's reassurances: It takes fifteen years for an iguana to get that big. I'll be married by then and probably living in my own house. and his mom's replies: How are you going to get a girl to marry you when you own a giant reptile? will have kids in hysterics as the negotiations go back and forth through notes. And the lively, imaginative illustrations show their polar opposite dreams of life with an iguana.
#4
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The Jolly Postman
Written by Allan Ahlberg & illustrated by Janet Ahlberg and Allan Ahlberg
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
This gorgeously illustrated, full-color classic celebrates a time before email by depicting amusing correspondence between fairy tale and Mother Goose characters. What could possibly be in a letter from Goldilocks to the Three Bears? Who would write to the Wicked Witch? Open this book, take out the letters, and discover what favorite characters would write to each other--and reimagine best-loved tales together.
#5
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The Day the Crayons Quit
Written by Drew Daywalt & illustrated by Oliver Jeffers
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7
Poor Duncan just wants to color. But when he opens his box of crayons, he finds only letters, all saying the same thing: His crayons have had enough! They quit! Beige Crayon is tired of playing second fiddle to Brown Crayon. Black wants to be used for more than just outlining. Blue needs a break from coloring all those bodies of water. And Orange and Yellow are no longer speaking—each believes he is the true color of the sun. What can Duncan possibly do to appease all of the crayons and get them back to doing what they do best?
#6
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Our Tree Named Steve
Written by Alan Zweibel & illustrated by David Catrow
picture book
Recommend Ages: 2-5
Dear Kids, A long time ago, when you were little, Mom and I took you to where we wanted to build a house. . . . I remember there was one tree, however, that the three of you couldn’t stop staring at. . . . After the family spares him from the builders, Steve the tree quickly works his way into their lives. He holds their underwear when the dryer breaks down, he’s there when Adam and Lindsay get their first crushes, and he’s the centerpiece at their outdoor family parties. With a surprising lack of anthropomorphizing, this is a uniquely poignant celebration of fatherhood, families, love, and change.
#7
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Dear Yeti
Written & illustrated by James Kwan
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
A sweet and whimsical story of a perfect kid-sized winter adventure, Dear Yeti is the debut picture book of an author/illustrator to watch. Two young hikers set out to look for Yeti one day, and with the help of a bird friend, they trek further and further into the woods, sending letters to coax the shy creature out of hiding. But as their trip goes on, the hikers find that they have not prepared very well, and though their morale is high, food supplies are low, the forest is getting darker, and a snowstorm looms. Luckily Yeti is a friend they can rely on, and though he's not ready to come out of hiding, he sneakily finds a way to get the hikers exactly what they need when they need it.
#8
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Bunny Mail
Written & illustrated by Rosemary Wells
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5
Ruby is busy sending out party invitations, so Max decides he'll write a letter too, asking for a special present. But when the postman delivers the letter to Grandma, she thinks Max is just saying hello. So Max sends another letter. It soon becomes clear to Grandma that Max is asking for something special. The only question is what? With eight clever flaps to lift, this heartwarming and interactive picture book gives Rosemary Wells fans even more reasons to love Max and Ruby, who are now starring in their own Nickelodeon television show.
#9
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Dear Dragon
Written by Josh Funk & illustrated by Rodolfo Montalvo
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
A sweet and clever friendship story in rhyme, about looking past physical differences to appreciate the person (or dragon) underneath. George and Blaise are pen pals, and they write letters to each other about everything: their pets, birthdays, favorite sports, and science fair projects. There’s just one thing that the two friends don’t know: George is a human, while Blaise is a dragon! What will happen when these pen pals finally meet face-to-face?
#10
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The Jolly Christmas Postman
Written by Allan Ahlberg & illustrated by Janet Ahlberg
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
The Jolly Postman rides again with more real letters, and presents, too, in his Christmas postbag. This gorgeously illustrated, full-color classic celebrates a time before email with an interactive picture book full of real letters to read aloud. The Jolly Postman brings a batch of wonderful letters for Christmas, including notes from the Big Bad Wolf and all the King's men. Open this book, take out the letters, and discover what favorite characters would write to each other--and reimagine best-loved tales together.
Table of Contents
Scroll to books about Letter Writing and...

Books About Letter Writing and Social Themes

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The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles
Written by Michelle Cuevas & illustrated by Erin E. Stead
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
A message in a bottle holds the promise of surprise and wonder, as told in this enthralling picture book by Caldecott Medalist Erin E. Stead The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles, who lives alone atop a hill, has a job of the utmost importance. It is his task to open any bottles found at sea and make sure that the messages are delivered. He loves his job, though he has always wished that, someday, one of the letters would be addressed to him. One day he opens a party invitation—but there’s no name attached. As he devotes himself to the mystery of the intended recipient, he ends up finding something even more special: the possibility of new friends.
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Dear Dragon
Written by Josh Funk & illustrated by Rodolfo Montalvo
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
A sweet and clever friendship story in rhyme, about looking past physical differences to appreciate the person (or dragon) underneath. George and Blaise are pen pals, and they write letters to each other about everything: their pets, birthdays, favorite sports, and science fair projects. There’s just one thing that the two friends don’t know: George is a human, while Blaise is a dragon! What will happen when these pen pals finally meet face-to-face?
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The Thank You Letter
Written & illustrated by Jane Cabrera
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Grace sets off to spread gratitude to everyone in her community and receives a delightful response! Grace writes charming and humorous letters to thank relatives and friends for her birthday presents. But why stop there? To who else can she give thanks? Grace thanks Mr. Jones for teaching her to read, her dog for his waggy tail, and the sky for being so blue. Soon showers of thoughtful letters and notes are circulating through the town. When Grace returns home, a gatefold reveals that the inside is decorated from floor to ceiling with notes, cards, and letters responding to her thoughtful missives. Favorite storytime author and illustrator, Jane Cabrera's vivid and textured acrylic paintings are filled with joyful cuteness and warmth. Patterns from the inside of envelopes smartly add to the epistolary theme. This delightful celebration of mindful thankfulness and community togetherness is perfect for curling up in a cozy spot and sharing one-on-one.
Honorable Mentions
When You Reach Me book
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Love from Lexie book
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You May Already Be a Winner book
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Dear Mr. Washington book
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  1. When You Reach Me - “Like A Wrinkle in Time (Miranda’s favorite book), When You Reach Me far surpasses the usual whodunit or sci-fi adventure to become an incandescent exploration of ‘life, death, and the beauty of it all.’” —The Washington Post This Newbery Medal winner that has been called “smart and mesmerizing,” (The New York Times) and “superb” (The Wall Street Journal) will appeal to readers of all types, especially those who are looking for a thought-provoking mystery with a mind-blowing twist. Shortly after a fall-out with her best friend, sixth grader Miranda starts receiving mysterious notes, and she doesn’t know what to do. The notes tell her that she must write a letter—a true story, and that she can’t share her mission with anyone. It would be easy to ignore the strange messages, except that whoever is leaving them has an uncanny ability to predict the future. If that is the case, then Miranda has a big problem—because the notes tell her that someone is going to die, and she might be too late to stop it. Winner of the Boston Globe–Horn Book Award for Fiction A New York Times Bestseller and Notable Book Five Starred Reviews A Junior Library Guild Selection “Absorbing.” —People “Readers … are likely to find themselves chewing over the details of this superb and intricate tale long afterward.” —The Wall Street Journal “Lovely and almost impossibly clever.” —The Philadelphia Inquirer “It’s easy to imagine readers studying Miranda’s story as many times as she’s read L’Engle’s, and spending hours pondering the provocative questions it raises.” —Publishers Weekly, Starred review

  2. Love from Lexie - Ever since Lexie’s mom vanished, her world hasn’t stopped spinning. A new home, a new school—even a new family, but Lexie never gives up hope that her mom will come back and writes her letters every day to tell her all about her new life. There’s plenty to tell—the new group of misfits she calls friends, the talent for music she never knew she had and the gorgeous boy with blue eyes and secrets to hide. But her letters remain unanswered and she’s starting to feel more alone than ever. Lexie’s about to learn that sometimes you need to get lost in order to be found. The first in a gorgeous new series that’s the perfect next step for fans of Jacqueline Wilson.

  3. You May Already Be a Winner - Twelve-year-old Olivia Hales has a foolproof plan for winning a million dollars so that she and her little sister, Berkeley, can leave behind Sunny Pines Trailer Park. But first she has to: · Fix the swamp cooler and make dinner and put Berkeley to bed because her mom is too busy to do all that · Write another letter to her dad even though he hasn’t written back yet · Teach Berk the important stuff, like how to make chalk drawings, because they can’t afford day care and Olivia has to stay home from school to watch her · Petition her oddball neighbors for a circus spectacular, because there needs to be something to look forward to at dumb-bum Sunny Pines · Become a super-secret spy to impress her new friend Bart · Enter a minimum of fourteen sweepstakes a day. Who knows? She may already be a winner!

  4. Dear Mr. Washington - Based on the true story behind Gilbert Stuart’s famous portraits of Washington, this funny historical read will leave rascals, ruffians, and troublemakers of all ages laughing. Charlotte, James, and baby John have promised to be on their very best behavior for when George Washington comes to have his portrait painted by their father, Gilbert Stuart. But, it seems like every time George Washington comes to visit, Charlotte has to write another apology letter, even when they try to follow George Washington’s Rules of Good Behavior. If these whippersnappers want any dessert, they are going to have to learn some manners—and fast! What results is a hilarious chain of events, a giant mess…and a painting that will be remembered for centuries to come.

Books About Letter Writing and Christmas

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Bunny Mail
Written & illustrated by Rosemary Wells
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5
Ruby is busy sending out party invitations, so Max decides he'll write a letter too, asking for a special present. But when the postman delivers the letter to Grandma, she thinks Max is just saying hello. So Max sends another letter. It soon becomes clear to Grandma that Max is asking for something special. The only question is what? With eight clever flaps to lift, this heartwarming and interactive picture book gives Rosemary Wells fans even more reasons to love Max and Ruby, who are now starring in their own Nickelodeon television show.
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The Jolly Christmas Postman
Written by Allan Ahlberg & illustrated by Janet Ahlberg
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
The Jolly Postman rides again with more real letters, and presents, too, in his Christmas postbag. This gorgeously illustrated, full-color classic celebrates a time before email with an interactive picture book full of real letters to read aloud. The Jolly Postman brings a batch of wonderful letters for Christmas, including notes from the Big Bad Wolf and all the King's men. Open this book, take out the letters, and discover what favorite characters would write to each other--and reimagine best-loved tales together.
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PS: Who Stole Santa's Mail?
Written by Dimity Powell & illustrated by Scott Anastasi
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 7-10
PS Who Stole Santa's Mail? is a lightly illustrated, action-packed, comical Christmas mystery about disappearing mail, an evil elf, and questionable smells that rips along at the speed of a galloping reindeer, proving for once and for all that Christmas and Santa are really worth believing in and that the power of belief can allow you to achieve astounding things, no matter how old you are.
Honorable Mentions
The Twelve Days of Christmas in Tennessee book
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Dear Santa, I Know it Looks Bad, But it Wasn't My Fault book
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The Twelve Days of Christmas in Oklahoma book
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The Crayons' Christmas book
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  1. The Twelve Days of Christmas in Tennessee - The Volunteer state is GREAT! When Carly visits her cousin Teddy in Tennessee for Christmas, she discovers how amazing it is. She hikes the Great Smoky Mountains, dances to bluegrass music, tastes Nashville’s famous hot chicken, and meets more than one Elvis Presley. Every day, Teddy gives her a special Tennessee gift, from 12 rockers rocking and 11 eagles nesting to a mockingbird in a tulip poplar tree.

  2. Dear Santa, I Know it Looks Bad, But it Wasn't My Fault - In a series of letters to Santa, Scalawag the cat explains his recent misadventures, including an incident involving a small house fire, a visit from the paramedics, and broken Christmas tree ornaments.

  3. The Twelve Days of Christmas in Oklahoma - This popular holiday book is now available in a sturdy board edition for very young children. The original text has been simplified to focus on the merry lyrics in this fun take on the classic Christmas song. It’s a happy, festive way for families to celebrate the place where they live.

  4. The Crayons' Christmas - A brand-new Crayons book from the #1 New York Times best-selling duo Drew Daywalt and Oliver Jeffers, just in time for the holidays. This special book has letters, games, ornaments, a poster, and even a pop-up Christmas tree! ‘Tis the season for all of us to write our holiday wishlists. But everyone—even the crayons—know the best presents are the ones that you give. In this unique book, readers get to see how Duncan, the crayons, and their families celebrate the holidays. With real, folded letters from the Crayons that you can pull from their envelopes and read, games, punch-out ornaments, a poster, and a pop-up tree, this book is the perfect gift for fans of The Day the Crayons Quit and The Day the Crayons Came Home.

Want to see books about Christmas?

Books About Letter Writing and Friendship

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Frog and Toad Are Friends
Written & illustrated by Arnold Lobel
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-8
From writing letters to going swimming, telling stories to finding lost buttons, Frog and Toad are always there for each other—just as best friends should be.
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Dear Yeti
Written & illustrated by James Kwan
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
A sweet and whimsical story of a perfect kid-sized winter adventure, Dear Yeti is the debut picture book of an author/illustrator to watch. Two young hikers set out to look for Yeti one day, and with the help of a bird friend, they trek further and further into the woods, sending letters to coax the shy creature out of hiding. But as their trip goes on, the hikers find that they have not prepared very well, and though their morale is high, food supplies are low, the forest is getting darker, and a snowstorm looms. Luckily Yeti is a friend they can rely on, and though he's not ready to come out of hiding, he sneakily finds a way to get the hikers exactly what they need when they need it.
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A Letter to Amy
Written by Ezra Jack Keats
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7
Generations of children have read, re-read, and loved Ezra Jack Keats's award-winning, classic stories about Peter and his neighborhood friends. Now, for the first time, _Peter's Chair, A Letter to Amy_, and _Goggles!_ are available in paperback exclusively from Puffin. "A master of ingenious collages, Keats has made brilliant variegated pictures."—_The Horn Book _Ezra Jack Keats (1916-1983) was the beloved author and/or illustrator of more than eighty-five books for children.
Honorable Mentions
Letters from Maisy book
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Same Sun Here book
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Kasey & Ivy book
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  1. Letters from Maisy - Maisy is on vacation, and she’s sending mail to all her friends! Readers will be thrilled to open her letters and find surprises inside. Join Maisy on an exciting journey as she travels through the mountains, visits a market, rows a boat along the river, has fun at a fair, and relaxes on the beach. As part of each adventure, Maisy sends a letter to a friend — and to her fans! Included are six real envelopes containing postcards, games, souvenirs, and more.

  2. Same Sun Here - A twelve-year-old Indian immigrant in New York City and a Kentucky coal miner’s son become pen pals, and eventually best friends, through a series of revealing letters exploring such topics as environmental activism, immigration, and racism.

  3. Kasey & Ivy - Through twenty-six letters to her friend Nina, twelve-year-old Kasey chronicles the often humorous observations and impressions of her unexpected, month-long stay in a geriatric ward for the treatment of a rare but treatable bone disease (“osteo-something-something-itis”). Kasey tries to make her life less dull by wearing her own nightgowns, surrounding herself with her favorite stuffies and developing an unusual exercise routine. Hospital food, insomnia and the germy communal bath are enduring sources of dread, but some new (and unexpected) friends make her life bearable.

Books About Letter Writing and Family

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Our Tree Named Steve
Written by Alan Zweibel & illustrated by David Catrow
picture book
Recommend Ages: 2-5
Dear Kids, A long time ago, when you were little, Mom and I took you to where we wanted to build a house. . . . I remember there was one tree, however, that the three of you couldn’t stop staring at. . . . After the family spares him from the builders, Steve the tree quickly works his way into their lives. He holds their underwear when the dryer breaks down, he’s there when Adam and Lindsay get their first crushes, and he’s the centerpiece at their outdoor family parties. With a surprising lack of anthropomorphizing, this is a uniquely poignant celebration of fatherhood, families, love, and change.
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Dear Beast
Written by Dori Hillestad Butler & illustrated by Kevan Atteberry
picture book
Recommend Ages: 6-9
A jealous cat really, really, REALLY wants to drive away his young owner's new dog in this playful illustrated chapter book from a two-time Geisel Honor winner. Simon has taken care of his owner, Andy, for many years. He's a good cat. Clean, responsible, and loyal. What more could a boy want? Even when Andy's dad moves out, Simon is certain that Andy doesn't need another pet. So why would Andy's dad adopt a DOG?! To make matters worse, the animal is a rude, rowdy troublemaker. Simon's job is clear: the beast has got to go. He decides to write him a letter. Strongly worded, of course. But when the dog's response sets off an unexpected correspondence, Simon realizes the beast may be here to stay. Can he make room for another pet in Andy's life? This funny and heartwarming collaboration between Geisel Honor and Edgar Award-winning author Dori Hillestad Butler and bestselling illustrator Kevan Atteberry is a tribute to the love of a good pet - and the joy found in new friendship. With nine chapters and adorable full-color illustrations on every spread, the series is perfect for kids transitioning from picture books to chapter books. A Junior Library Guild Selection
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Captain Rosalie
Written by Timothée de Fombelle & illustrated by Isabelle Arsenault
picture book
Recommend Ages: 8-12
Timothée de Fombelle and Isabelle Arsenault capture the heart-wrenching cost of war for one small girl in a delicately drawn, expertly told tale. While her father is at war, five-year-old Rosalie is a captain on her own secret mission. She wears the disguise of a little girl and tracks her progress in a secret notebook. Some evenings, Rosalie's mother reads aloud Father's letters from the front lines, so that Rosalie knows he is thinking of her and looking forward to the end of the war and to finally coming home. But one day a letter comes that her mother doesn't read to her, and Rosalie knows her mission must soon come to an end. Author Timothée de Fombelle reveals the true consequence of war through the experiences of small, determined Rosalie, while acclaimed artist Isabelle Arsenault illustrates Rosalie's story in muted grays marked with soft spots of color -- the orange flame of Rosalie's hair, the pale pink of a scarf, the deep blue ink of her father's letters. All the more captivating for the simplicity with which it is drawn and told, this quiet tale will stay with the reader long after its last page is turned.
Honorable Mentions
I Love You, Michael Collins book
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Ice Cream Summer book
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Anastasia at This Address book
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Dear Mr. Henshaw book
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  1. I Love You, Michael Collins - A funny and heartwarming middle-grade historical fiction novel about a girl who writes letters to her favorite astronaut as America prepares for the moon landing. It’s 1969 and the country is gearing up for what looks to be the most exciting moment in U.S. history: men landing on the moon. Ten-year-old Mamie’s class is given an assignment to write letters to the astronauts. All the girls write to Neil Armstrong (“So cute!”) and all the boys write to Buzz Aldrin (“So cool!”). Only Mamie writes to Michael Collins, the astronaut who will come so close but never achieve everyone else’s dream of walking on the moon, because he is the one who must stay out in space with the ship. After school ends, Mamie keeps writing to Michael Collins, taking comfort in telling someone about what’s going on with her family as, one by one, they leave the house thinking that someone else is taking care of her—until she is all alone except for her cat and her best friend, Buster. And as the date of the launch nears, Mamie can’t help but wonder: Does no one stay with the ship anymore? With I Love You, Michael Collins, Lauren Baratz-Logsted has created a heartwarming story about family and being true to yourself. A Margaret Ferguson Book “Baratz-Logsted weaves in just enough history to root Mamie’s story in her time, a moment when a nation came together and felt proud of human possibilities. . . . Readers will be charmed by Mamie’s story of hope in a difficult moment in American history.” —Kirkus Reviews

  2. Ice Cream Summer - A little boy writes a letter to his grandfather about all the reading and studying he is doing this summer—but all his activities revolve around ice cream.

  3. Anastasia at This Address - Unfazed by her friends’ decision to give up boys, Anastasia Krupnik answers a personal ad she finds in a magazine. When the special “he” decides he wants to meet her, Anastasia finds herself in quite a predicament—especially since her letters might have stretched the truth just a tiny bit…

  4. Dear Mr. Henshaw - Dear Mr. Henshaw, I wish somebody would stop stealing the good stuff out of my lunchbag. I guess I wish a lot of other things, too. I wish someday Dad and Bandit would pull up in front in the rig … Dad would yell out of the cab, “Come on, Leigh. Hop in and I’ll give you a lift to school.” Leigh Botts has been author Boyd Henshaw’s number one fan ever since he was in second grade. Now in sixth grade, Leigh lives with his mother and is the new kid at school. He’s lonely, troubled by the absence of his father, a cross-country trucker, and angry because a mysterious thief steals from his lunchbag. Then Leigh’s teacher assigns a letter-writing project. Naturally Leigh chooses to write to Mr. Henshaw, whose surprising answer changes Leigh’s life.

Books About Letter Writing and Animals

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I Wanna Iguana
Written by Karen Kaufman Orloff & illustrated by David Catrow
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Alex just has to convince his mom to let him have an iguana, so he puts his arguments in writing. He promises that she won't have to feed it or clean its cage or even see it if she doesn't want to. Of course Mom imagines life with a six-foot-long iguana eating them out of house and home. Alex's reassurances: It takes fifteen years for an iguana to get that big. I'll be married by then and probably living in my own house. and his mom's replies: How are you going to get a girl to marry you when you own a giant reptile? will have kids in hysterics as the negotiations go back and forth through notes. And the lively, imaginative illustrations show their polar opposite dreams of life with an iguana.
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The Last Polar Bears (Harry Horse's Last...)
Written & illustrated by Harry Horse
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-10
Grandfather is off on an expedition to the North Pole to find the Last Polar Bears. Accompanying him is Roo, a remarkable little dog with strong views and a short attention span, and a golf cart full of equipment. The intrepid explorers set sail on the good ship Unsinkable and embark on the adventure of a lifetime. Grandfather and Roo endure storms, high seas, a temperamental sea captain, and seasickness until the ship reaches Walrus Bay. In the primitive coastal town of Walrus, Grandfather gets in a game of golf but unscrupulous wolves plague him and Roo. Finally, Grandfather and Roo and a penguin companion head off on foot to find the Great Bear Ridge, home to the Last Polar Bears. Author-illustrator Harry Horse tells this hilarious, original story through a series of affectionate letters written by Grandfather to his grandchild back home. Horse s winsome black ink illustrations capture the charmingly eccentric personalities of Grandfather and his delightful canine companion and the amusing calamities that befall them. The result is a fanciful tale that will delight young and old alike. Stay tuned for more adventures with Grandfather and Roo!
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Alphabeasts
Written & illustrated by Maree Coote
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5
A brand new collection of illustrations by this award-winning illustrator. Every image is a typographic portrait of each animal subject, created using only the letters of each animal's name. Remarkable likenesses and body language. A great way to learn the alphabet, improve spelling, letter-recognition and observation, and discover typography and design.
Honorable Mentions
XO, OX book
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Ten Thank-You Letters book
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Peppa Pig and the Lost Christmas List book
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  1. XO, OX - Dear Gazelle,For some time now I have wanted to write a letter to say how much I admire you. You are so graceful and fine. Even when you are running from tigers you are like a ballerina who is running away from tigers.I think that what I’m trying to say is that I love you.XO,OXAnd so begins an epic, if initially unrequited, love affair between a graceful gazelle and a clumsy, hapless ox. Romance will never be the same. Adam Rex’s hilarious, sweet, and at times heartbreaking letters between a hopelessly romantic ox and a conceited, beautiful gazelle is paired perfectly with Scott Campbell’s joyful illustrations to bring you a romance for the ages.

  2. Ten Thank-You Letters - Pig is writing a thank-you note to his grandma when his friend Rabbit comes over to play. Eager to get in on the action, Rabbit writes one of his own . . . and another . . . and another . . . until his flurry of thank-you notes has Pig in a tizzy. Pig just wants to finish writing his note in peace! Fortunately, Rabbit’s last thank-you note reminds Pig how lucky he is to have Rabbit as a friend. This funny friendship story shows how different personalities can manage to fit together perfectly. Rabbit’s letters to everyone from the president to the crossing guard will have readers chuckling as the delightful duo from Ten Things I Love About You discovers the joy of showing gratitude to the special people in their lives.

  3. Peppa Pig and the Lost Christmas List - It’s almost Christmas, and Peppa Pig and her little brother, George, are mailing their letters to Santa. All of Peppa’s friends are there, too, and each one tells Peppa the special gift on their list. Peppa is excited to help Daddy Pig and Mummy Pig pick out and decorate their enormous tree, and she can’t wait for the big day to arrive. But little does she know that a surprise is in store on Christmas Eve, and that she may play a part in saving the day! Peppa is the endearing star of Peppa Pig — a BAFTA-winning preschool TV series that has been a long-running success in the U.K. and is now winning devoted fans in the U.S. with daily showings on Nick Jr. Peppa and her little brother, her daddy, her mummy, and her many friends arrive at Candlewick just in time for the holiday season, poised for much muddy puddle jumping and more new adventures to come.

Want to see books about animals?

Books About Letter Writing and Siblings

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Letters from Camp
Written by Kate Klise & illustrated by M. Sarah Klise
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12
Mom and Dad, You've got to get us out of here! When you get this letter, COME IMMEDIATELY! -- Charlie The brother-sister pairs who arrive for the summer at Camp Happy Harmony are almost too busy fighting with each other to notice how strange the camp really is. Not only are the campers forced to wear bizarre uniforms, eat gross food, and do chores all day, but the members of the family that runs the camp fight constantly--with each other. Are the campers in danger? Or--in spite of sibling wars--do they need to stick together to solve the mystery humming under the surface of Camp Happy Harmony?
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P.S. I Miss You
Written by Jen Petro-Roy
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12
Evie is heartbroken when her strict Catholic parents send her pregnant sister, Cilla, away to stay with a distant great-aunt. All Evie wants is for her older sister to come back. Forbidden from speaking to Cilla, Evie secretly sends her letters.
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Stink and the Incredible Super-Galactic Jawbreaker
Written by Megan McDonald & illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-9
Spurred by a newfound awareness of false advertising, Stink Moody becomes the proverbial kid in a candy store as his letter-writing campaign yields him heaps of free rewards (ages 5-8). When Stink buys a mammoth jawbreaker that doesn't break his jaw, he writes a letter of complaint to the manufacturer - and receives a ten-pound box of 21,280 jawbreakers for his trouble! This unexpected benefit of acing the art of letter-writing in school sure gets Stink thinking. Soon Stink is so preoccupied with getting free stuff sent to him that he overlooks a scribbly envelope in the mail pile - until his best friend, Webster, starts acting standoffish and looks as mad as a hornet. In this hilarious new episode from Megan McDonald and Peter H. Reynolds, Judy Moody's shorter sibling truly comes into his own. As a delightful bonus for both teachers and kids, thirty-six common idioms - from "two heads are better than one" to "a leopard can’t change its spots" - are sprinkled throughout the story; seven of the idioms are humorously illustrated by Stink, and all are listed at the end to inspire a search for idioms that’s more fun than a barrel of monkeys.
Honorable Mentions
Peace, Locomotion book
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Love, Penelope book
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  1. Peace, Locomotion - Twelve-year-old Lonnie is finally feeling at home with his foster family. But because he’s living apart from his little sister, Lili, he decides it’s his job to be the “rememberer”—and write down everything that happens while they’re growing up. Lonnie’s musings are bittersweet; he’s happy that he and Lili have new families, but though his new family brings him joy, it also brings new worries. With a foster brother in the army, concepts like Peace have new meaning for Lonnie.Told through letters from Lonnie to Lili, this thought-provoking companion to Jacqueline Woodson’s National Book Award finalist Locomotion tackles important issues in captivating, lyrical language. Lonnie’s reflections on family, loss, love and peace will strike a note with readers of all ages.

  2. Love, Penelope - Penny is excited to welcome her new sibling, so throughout her mom’s pregnancy she writes letters to it (not it, YOU!). She introduces herself (Penelope, but she prefers “Penny”) and their moms (Sammy and Becky). She brags about their home city, Oakland, California (the weather, the Bay, and the Golden State Warriors) and shares the trials and tribulations of being a fifth-grader (which, luckily, YOU won’t have to worry about for a long time). Penny asks little questions about her sibling’s development and starts to ask big questions about the world around her (like if and when her moms are ever going to get married “for real”). Honest, relatable, and full of heart, Love, Penelope explores heritage, forgiveness, love, and identity through the eyes (and pen) of one memorable 10-year-old in a special year when marriage equality and an NBA championship made California a place of celebration.

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