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Mail: Books For Kids

Looking for a list of the best children's books about mail?

Children’s literature has many notable options when it comes to mail. To help you find the right books for you and your young reader, we’ve compiled a list of the best kids books about mail.

Our list includes board books, picture books, and chapter books. Board books are best for babies and toddlers from ages newborn to 2 or 3. Picture books are generally great options for toddlers and for preschool and kindergarten age children. Picture books are especially enjoyable for adults to read aloud with young kids. The chapter books on our list are generally best for elementary through early middle school age tween kids. You can filter to sort by the best book type for your kid.

When it comes to children’s stories about mail, there are a variety of titles. This list covers everything, from classics like Dear Yeti to popular sellers like The Day the Crayons Quit to some of our favorite hidden gems like The Day the Crayons Came Home.

We hope this list of kids books about mail can be a helpful resource for parents, teachers, and others searching for a new book! As you explore the list, please comment below to let us know what books you would add.

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The Little I Who Lost His Dot
Written by Kimberlee Gard & illustrated by Sandie Sonke
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-6
Little i can't wait to meet his friends at school, but there's just one problem: he can't find his dot anywhere? Each letter offers a replacement--an acorn from Little a, a balloon from Little b, a clock from Little c--but nothing seems quite right. Adorable illustrations teach alphabet letters and sounds with a surprising and satisfying ending to Little i's search.
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Off & Away
Written & illustrated by Cale Atkinson
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
How would you get mail if you lived in the middle of the sea? It's Jo's dad's job to deliver it, taking bottles wherever they need to go. He always comes home with exciting stories to tell-but Jo is far too afraid to go out on the ocean herself. Until Dad gets a bad sea cold, that is. With no one but Jo to deliver the bottles, she must find her courage and set sail alone. As she embarks on her mission, her fears just might be replaced with new friendships . . . and grand stories of her own. With beautiful, atmospheric art and endearing new characters by author-illustrator Cale Atkinson, this picturebook is a treasure.
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The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles
Written by Michelle Cuevas & illustrated by Erin E. Stead
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
A message in a bottle holds the promise of surprise and wonder, as told in this enthralling picture book by Caldecott Medalist Erin E. Stead The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles, who lives alone atop a hill, has a job of the utmost importance. It is his task to open any bottles found at sea and make sure that the messages are delivered. He loves his job, though he has always wished that, someday, one of the letters would be addressed to him. One day he opens a party invitation—but there’s no name attached. As he devotes himself to the mystery of the intended recipient, he ends up finding something even more special: the possibility of new friends.
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The Jolly Postman
Written by Allan Ahlberg & illustrated by Janet Ahlberg and Allan Ahlberg
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
This gorgeously illustrated, full-color classic celebrates a time before email by depicting amusing correspondence between fairy tale and Mother Goose characters. What could possibly be in a letter from Goldilocks to the Three Bears? Who would write to the Wicked Witch? Open this book, take out the letters, and discover what favorite characters would write to each other--and reimagine best-loved tales together.
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I Wanna Iguana
Written by Karen Kaufman Orloff & illustrated by David Catrow
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Alex just has to convince his mom to let him have an iguana, so he puts his arguments in writing. He promises that she won't have to feed it or clean its cage or even see it if she doesn't want to. Of course Mom imagines life with a six-foot-long iguana eating them out of house and home. Alex's reassurances: It takes fifteen years for an iguana to get that big. I'll be married by then and probably living in my own house. and his mom's replies: How are you going to get a girl to marry you when you own a giant reptile? will have kids in hysterics as the negotiations go back and forth through notes. And the lively, imaginative illustrations show their polar opposite dreams of life with an iguana.
The Day the Crayons Quit book
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I Dream of a Journey book
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Our Tree Named Steve book
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The Day the Crayons Came Home book
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  • The Day the Crayons Quit - Poor Duncan just wants to color. But when he opens his box of crayons, he finds only letters, all saying the same thing: His crayons have had enough! They quit! Beige Crayon is tired of playing second fiddle to Brown Crayon. Black wants to be used for more than just outlining. Blue needs a break from coloring all those bodies of water. And Orange and Yellow are no longer speaking—each believes he is the true color of the sun. What can Duncan possibly do to appease all of the crayons and get them back to doing what they do best?

  • I Dream of a Journey - Akiko Miyakoshi’s enchanting picture book explores how an innkeeper who spends his days at the crossroads of others’ journeys secretly longs to have adventures of his own. People from all over the world come and go at the innkeeper’s little hotel. He enjoys meeting them, and many even become his friends. Only, sometimes, when he goes to sleep at night, the desire to travel far away himself wells up inside him. He dreams of packing a big bag and journeying wherever he pleases, from one unfamiliar town to another. He imagines stopping to visit friends and having wonderful and unexpected experiences. The innkeeper continues to go about his daily routine at his hotel, but, someday, he is sure, he will explore the world. This beautiful picture book from multi-award-winning and internationally best-selling author-illustrator Akiko Miyakoshi thoughtfully speaks to the common experience of longing for something new and exciting, while feeling comfort in the familiar. The artwork’s muted colors and soft focus give it a dreamlike quality and, paired with the spare, simple text, invokes wonder, leaving many questions open to interpretation. This book perfectly captures the feeling of wanderlust, of being curious about the world, wanting to see other places and how other people live. It could ignite intriguing conversations with children about what they long to do. Its message is also likely to resonate with adults.

  • Our Tree Named Steve - Dear Kids, A long time ago, when you were little, Mom and I took you to where we wanted to build a house. . . . I remember there was one tree, however, that the three of you couldn’t stop staring at. . . . After the family spares him from the builders, Steve the tree quickly works his way into their lives. He holds their underwear when the dryer breaks down, he’s there when Adam and Lindsay get their first crushes, and he’s the centerpiece at their outdoor family parties. With a surprising lack of anthropomorphizing, this is a uniquely poignant celebration of fatherhood, families, love, and change.

  • The Day the Crayons Came Home - I’m not sure what it is about this kid Duncan, but his crayons sure are a colorful bunch of characters! Having soothed the hurt feelings of one group who threatened to quit, Duncan now faces a whole new group of crayons asking to be rescued. From Maroon Crayon, who was lost beneath the sofa cushions and then broken in two after Dad sat on him; to poor Turquoise, whose head is now stuck to one of Duncan’s stinky socks after they both ended up in the dryer together; to Pea Green, who knows darn well that no kid likes peas and who ran away—each and every crayon has a woeful tale to tell and a plea to be brought home to the crayon box. Look for a special glow-in-the-dark picture [Note: make sure to “charge” it under a light first].

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Bunny Mail
Written & illustrated by Rosemary Wells
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5
Ruby is busy sending out party invitations, so Max decides he'll write a letter too, asking for a special present. But when the postman delivers the letter to Grandma, she thinks Max is just saying hello. So Max sends another letter. It soon becomes clear to Grandma that Max is asking for something special. The only question is what? With eight clever flaps to lift, this heartwarming and interactive picture book gives Rosemary Wells fans even more reasons to love Max and Ruby, who are now starring in their own Nickelodeon television show.
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Mail Duck: A Book of Shapes and Surprises
Written & illustrated by Erica Sirotich
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-3
**Come along on Mail Duck’s delivery route for a day full of lift-the-flap surprises!** Mail Duck is delivering differently shaped packages to all his friends on his mail route. (Trudy likes triangles, and Harry likes hearts!) Lift the flaps to peek inside and guess what each friend received. Then head back to the post office for a big surprise: a thank-you celebration for Mail Duck planned by all his pals using the various packages they received throughout the story! Sixteen flaps and a final double-gatefold spread give readers plenty of sweet and silly details to unpack in this charming board book.
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The Jolly Christmas Postman
Written by Allan Ahlberg & illustrated by Janet Ahlberg
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
The Jolly Postman rides again with more real letters, and presents, too, in his Christmas postbag. This gorgeously illustrated, full-color classic celebrates a time before email with an interactive picture book full of real letters to read aloud. The Jolly Postman brings a batch of wonderful letters for Christmas, including notes from the Big Bad Wolf and all the King's men. Open this book, take out the letters, and discover what favorite characters would write to each other--and reimagine best-loved tales together.
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A Letter to Amy
Written by Ezra Jack Keats
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7
Generations of children have read, re-read, and loved Ezra Jack Keats's award-winning, classic stories about Peter and his neighborhood friends. Now, for the first time, _Peter's Chair, A Letter to Amy_, and _Goggles!_ are available in paperback exclusively from Puffin. "A master of ingenious collages, Keats has made brilliant variegated pictures."—_The Horn Book _Ezra Jack Keats (1916-1983) was the beloved author and/or illustrator of more than eighty-five books for children.
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Dear Yeti
Written & illustrated by James Kwan
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
A sweet and whimsical story of a perfect kid-sized winter adventure, Dear Yeti is the debut picture book of an author/illustrator to watch. Two young hikers set out to look for Yeti one day, and with the help of a bird friend, they trek further and further into the woods, sending letters to coax the shy creature out of hiding. But as their trip goes on, the hikers find that they have not prepared very well, and though their morale is high, food supplies are low, the forest is getting darker, and a snowstorm looms. Luckily Yeti is a friend they can rely on, and though he's not ready to come out of hiding, he sneakily finds a way to get the hikers exactly what they need when they need it.
Dear Dragon book
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The Thank You Letter book
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PS: Who Stole Santa's Mail? book
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The Giant Hug book
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  • Dear Dragon - A sweet and clever friendship story in rhyme, about looking past physical differences to appreciate the person (or dragon) underneath. George and Blaise are pen pals, and they write letters to each other about everything: their pets, birthdays, favorite sports, and science fair projects. There’s just one thing that the two friends don’t know: George is a human, while Blaise is a dragon! What will happen when these pen pals finally meet face-to-face?

  • The Thank You Letter - Grace sets off to spread gratitude to everyone in her community and receives a delightful response! Grace writes charming and humorous letters to thank relatives and friends for her birthday presents. But why stop there? To who else can she give thanks? Grace thanks Mr. Jones for teaching her to read, her dog for his waggy tail, and the sky for being so blue. Soon showers of thoughtful letters and notes are circulating through the town. When Grace returns home, a gatefold reveals that the inside is decorated from floor to ceiling with notes, cards, and letters responding to her thoughtful missives. Favorite storytime author and illustrator, Jane Cabrera’s vivid and textured acrylic paintings are filled with joyful cuteness and warmth. Patterns from the inside of envelopes smartly add to the epistolary theme. This delightful celebration of mindful thankfulness and community togetherness is perfect for curling up in a cozy spot and sharing one-on-one.

  • PS: Who Stole Santa's Mail? - PS Who Stole Santa’s Mail? is a lightly illustrated, action-packed, comical Christmas mystery about disappearing mail, an evil elf, and questionable smells that rips along at the speed of a galloping reindeer, proving for once and for all that Christmas and Santa are really worth believing in and that the power of belief can allow you to achieve astounding things, no matter how old you are.

  • The Giant Hug - How do you give your granny a hug when she lives far away? Send it through the mail, of course! Owen’s hug travels across the country in a series of hilarious, sometimes awkward, always heartfelt embraces between animals of different shapes and sizes. Valeri Gorbachev’s adorable artwork pairs beautifully with Sandra Horning’s charming text, and makes for a fun, funny, and educational read-aloud. An unexpected twist at the end will delight readers and have kids asking for this book again and again.

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Love, Agnes: Postcards from an Octopus
Written by Irene Latham & illustrated by Thea Baker
picture book
Recommend Ages: 7-8
Agnes has a beak that can crush bones and arms and stretch wide as a car―but that doesn't make her a monster! After she comes across a postcard, Agnes, a giant Pacific octopus, strikes up a correspondence with various other creatures below―and above―the waves. Readers will delight in this unlikely introduction to the octopus life cycle.
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Letters from Maisy
Written & illustrated by Lucy Cousins
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5
**Maisy is on vacation, and she's sending mail to all her friends! Readers will be thrilled to open her letters and find surprises inside.** Join Maisy on an exciting journey as she travels through the mountains, visits a market, rows a boat along the river, has fun at a fair, and relaxes on the beach. As part of each adventure, Maisy sends a letter to a friend -- and to her fans! Included are six real envelopes containing postcards, games, souvenirs, and more.
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Dear Beast
Written by Dori Hillestad Butler & illustrated by Kevan Atteberry
picture book
Recommend Ages: 6-9
A jealous cat really, really, REALLY wants to drive away his young owner's new dog in this playful illustrated chapter book from a two-time Geisel Honor winner. Simon has taken care of his owner, Andy, for many years. He's a good cat. Clean, responsible, and loyal. What more could a boy want? Even when Andy's dad moves out, Simon is certain that Andy doesn't need another pet. So why would Andy's dad adopt a DOG?! To make matters worse, the animal is a rude, rowdy troublemaker. Simon's job is clear: the beast has got to go. He decides to write him a letter. Strongly worded, of course. But when the dog's response sets off an unexpected correspondence, Simon realizes the beast may be here to stay. Can he make room for another pet in Andy's life? This funny and heartwarming collaboration between Geisel Honor and Edgar Award-winning author Dori Hillestad Butler and bestselling illustrator Kevan Atteberry is a tribute to the love of a good pet - and the joy found in new friendship. With nine chapters and adorable full-color illustrations on every spread, the series is perfect for kids transitioning from picture books to chapter books. A Junior Library Guild Selection
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Captain Rosalie
Written by Timothée de Fombelle & illustrated by Isabelle Arsenault
picture book
Recommend Ages: 8-12
Timothée de Fombelle and Isabelle Arsenault capture the heart-wrenching cost of war for one small girl in a delicately drawn, expertly told tale. While her father is at war, five-year-old Rosalie is a captain on her own secret mission. She wears the disguise of a little girl and tracks her progress in a secret notebook. Some evenings, Rosalie's mother reads aloud Father's letters from the front lines, so that Rosalie knows he is thinking of her and looking forward to the end of the war and to finally coming home. But one day a letter comes that her mother doesn't read to her, and Rosalie knows her mission must soon come to an end. Author Timothée de Fombelle reveals the true consequence of war through the experiences of small, determined Rosalie, while acclaimed artist Isabelle Arsenault illustrates Rosalie's story in muted grays marked with soft spots of color -- the orange flame of Rosalie's hair, the pale pink of a scarf, the deep blue ink of her father's letters. All the more captivating for the simplicity with which it is drawn and told, this quiet tale will stay with the reader long after its last page is turned.
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The Twelve Days of Christmas in Tennessee
Written by Alice Faye Duncan & illustrated by Mary Uhles
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
The Volunteer state is GREAT! When Carly visits her cousin Teddy in Tennessee for Christmas, she discovers how amazing it is. She hikes the Great Smoky Mountains, dances to bluegrass music, tastes Nashville’s famous hot chicken, and meets more than one Elvis Presley. Every day, Teddy gives her a special Tennessee gift, from 12 rockers rocking and 11 eagles nesting to a mockingbird in a tulip poplar tree.
Write to Me book
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Dear Santa, I Know it Looks Bad, But it Wasn't My Fault book
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Snail Mail book
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Can I Be Your Dog? book
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  • Write to Me - “Dear Miss Breed . . .” A touching story about Japanese American children who corresponded with their beloved librarian while they were imprisoned in World War II internment camps. When Executive Order 9066 is enacted after the attack at Pearl Harbor, children’s librarian Clara Breed’s young Japanese American patrons are to be sent to prison camp. Before they are moved, Breed asks the children to write her letters and gives them books to take with them. Through the three years of their internment, the children correspond with Miss Breed, sharing their stories, providing feedback on books, and creating a record of their experiences. Using excerpts from children’s letters held at the Japanese American National Museum, author Cynthia Grady presents a difficult subject with honesty and hope.

  • Dear Santa, I Know it Looks Bad, But it Wasn't My Fault - In a series of letters to Santa, Scalawag the cat explains his recent misadventures, including an incident involving a small house fire, a visit from the paramedics, and broken Christmas tree ornaments.

  • Snail Mail - A long, long time ago, before email and texting, the mail was delivered in a much slower way-it was called Snail Mail (because some thought it was delivered by a snail). Although it took much longer, everyone agreed that letters were a little more special when they were delivered by Snail Mail. They might be handwritten. They might include a drawing. They might even contain a surprise inside! One such letter was sent by a Girl to the Boy she loved, and it was up to four special snails to deliver her card across the country. The snails trek across the country-through desert heat and dangerous blizzards, across mountains and plains, through cities and forests-and along the way, they find that taking time to slow down and look around makes the journey all the more beautiful. Snail Mail’s playful and educational story encourages kids to have slow living, and to approach life with determination and wonder. Julia Patton’s rich illustrations showcase America’s diverse terrain and national monuments from coast to coast. Kids and parents alike will delight in this celebration of America’s beauty and the power of a simple handwritten letter.

  • Can I Be Your Dog? - A dog looking for a home sends letters to prospective owners on Butternut Street, with surprising results.

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Millie Waits for the Mail (Millie's Misadventures)
Written & illustrated by Alexander Steffensmeier
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
Millie is unlike most other cows. She chews her cud and grazes in the fields with the others, but she doesn't enjoy that nearly as much as she loves scaring the mail carrier. It's too bad the mail carrier doesn't have as much fun each time Millie comes up with a new way to surprise him. Who knew delivering the mail was going to be such a difficult job?
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It Came in the Mail
Written & illustrated by Ben Clanton
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
From the author-illustrator of Something Extraordinary comes a tale filled with dragons, pickles, friendship, and lots of mail—perfect for fans of Mo Williams and Bob Shea. Liam really wants some mail, so he writes a letter to his mailbox asking for something in return. His mailbox delivers, sending Liam more than he could have hoped for…and how! But as the mail starts to pile up, Liam realizes that the best packages and parcels are even better when shared with friends.
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Stringbean's Trip to the Shining Sea
Written by Jennifer Williams and Vera B. Williams & illustrated by Vera B. Williams
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Dear Reader, Here are the postcards and snapshots that Stringbean Coe and his brother Fred sent home from the long trip they made one summer in Fred's truck. Their grandfather made this album for the family--and for you. Enjoy yourselves! Love, Vera and Jennifer Stringbean Coe, his big brother, Fred, and their dog, Potato, are driving from Kansas to California in a pickup truck with a little house built on the back. Reading the postcards they send home every day is the next best thing to having a cross-country adventure all your own. "A good-hearted celebration of life and experience, and a gift to the public."--School Library Journal
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The Train to Impossible Places
Written by P G Bell
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 10-14
A train that travels through impossible places. A boy trapped in a snow globe. And a girl who’s about to go on the adventure of a lifetime.Suzy Smith believes in science. Then the Impossible Postal Express comes roaring through her living room and her world turns upside down. After sneaking on board, Suzy suddenly finds herself Deputy Post Master aboard the train,and faced with her first delivery—to the evil Lady Crepuscula. Then, the package itself begs Suzy not to deliver him. A talking snow globe, Frederick has information Crepuscula could use to take over the entire Union of Impossible Places.But when protecting Frederick means putting her friends in danger, Suzy has to make a difficult choice—with the fate of the entire Union at stake
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Fearless Mary
Written by Tami Charles & illustrated by Claire Almon
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
"The true story of Mary Fields, aka "Stagecoach Mary," a trailblazing African American woman who helped settle the American West."--Provided by the Publisher.
Hey Grandude! book
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Larabee book
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  • Hey Grandude! - The New York Times bestseller from Paul McCartney—an action-packed picture-book adventure celebrating the fun that grandparents and grandkids can get up to. See the compass needle spin, let the magic fun begin! Meet Grandude—a super-cool grandfather who is an intrepid explorer with some amazing tricks up his sleeve. Grandude is a one-of-a-kind adventurer! With his magic compass, he whisks his four grandkids off on whirlwind adventures, taking them all around the globe. Join them as they ride flying fish, dodge stampedes, and escape avalanches! Brought to life with gloriously colorful illustrations from talented artist Kathryn Durst, it’s the perfect bedtime story for little explorers.

  • Larabee - Larabee likes everything about delivering mail, except that he has never received any himself!
    Every morning, the mailman Mr. Bowman and his dog Larabee wake up very early to deliver the mail. Larabee likes riding in the mail truck and carrying the mailbag. He likes delivering the mail, and he always, always makes sure it is delivered on time. There’s only one thing Larabee doesn’t like: There is never a letter for him! Then one day, after all the mail has been delivered, Mr. Bowman reaches into his bag and finds a letter…addressed to Larabee!
    Kevin Luthardt utilizes his highly expressive, comical, full-color illustrations and minimal text to poignantly and humorously dramatize this special tale of the pure joy that can result from the simplest expression of friendship.

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