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Math: Books For Kids

Looking for a list of the best kids books about math?

Children’s literature has many notable options when it comes to math. To help you find the right books for you and your young reader, we’ve compiled a list of the best kids books about math.

Our list includes board books, picture books, and chapter books. Board books are best for babies and toddlers from ages newborn to 2 or 3. Picture books are generally great options for toddlers and for preschool and kindergarten age children. Picture books are especially enjoyable for adults to read aloud with young kids. The chapter books on our list are generally best for elementary through early middle school age tween kids. You can filter to sort by the best book type for your kid, and you can also use our table of contents to jump to particular topics you think your kid will enjoy.

When it comes to children’s stories about math, there are a variety of titles. This list covers everything, from classics like Baby Loves Gravity to popular sellers like The Lemonade War to some of our favorite hidden gems like Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code.

We hope this list of kids books about math can be a helpful resource for parents, teachers, and others searching for a new book! As you explore the list, please comment below to let us know what books you would add.

Top 10 Books About Math

#1
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This Little Trailblazer: A Girl Power Primer
Written by Joan Holub & illustrated by Daniel Roode
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-5
Learn all about influential women who changed history in this engaging and colorful board book perfect for trailblazers-in-training! Paving the way to a future that’s bright. Helping the world with their skills, smarts, and might. Little trailblazers cause great big changes. In this follow up to This Little President and This Little Explorer, now even the youngest readers can learn all about great and empowering female trailblazers in history! Highlighting ten memorable women leaders who paved the way, parents and little ones alike will love this girl power primer full of fun, age-appropriate facts and bold illustrations.
#2
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Ada Lovelace
Written by Isabel Sanchez Vegara & illustrated by Zafouko Yamamoto
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-4
New, in the My First Little People, Big Dreams series: Introduce your littlest one to the world’s first computer programmer, Ada Lovelace. Told in simple sentences, this young reader edition of the best-selling series is perfect to read out loud to little dreamers. This empowering series celebrates the important life stories of wonderful women of the world – and is now in available in a board format for little hands! These books make the lives of these role models accessible for the youngest children, providing a powerful message to inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world!
#3
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The World-Famous Book of Counting
Written & illustrated by Sarah Goodreau
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-7
Prepare to be amazed by this fabulously clever lift-the-flap, pop-up, pull-out book about numbers. Sarah Goodreau's magic-themed illustrations add a touch of nostalgia and vintage glamour to this fun and elegant counting book. With spectacular sorcery and sensational illusions, there's something here for magic lovers of all ages. A stylish lift-the-flap, pop-up, pull-out book about numbers with a magic theme
#4
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Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code
Written by Laurie Wallmark & illustrated by Katy Wu
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-9
Who was Grace Hopper? A software tester, workplace jester, cherished mentor, ace inventor, avid reader, naval leader—AND rule breaker, chance taker, and troublemaker. Acclaimed picture book author Laurie Wallmark (Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine) once again tells the riveting story of a trailblazing woman. Grace Hopper coined the term “computer bug” and taught computers to “speak English.” Throughout her life, Hopper succeeded in doing what no one had ever done before. Delighting in difficult ideas and in defying expectations, the insatiably curious Hopper truly was “Amazing Grace” . . . and a role model for science- and math-minded girls and boys. With a wealth of witty quotes, and richly detailed illustrations, this book brings Hopper's incredible accomplishments to life.
#5
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Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Engineering
Written by Bob Cooper & illustrated by Greg Paprocki
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
An introductory primer for kids focusing on the "E" portion of "STEAM" engineering. With original Renaissance man Leonardo da Vinci as inspiration, this exciting new volume in the Little Leonardo series introduces kids to many of the different types of engineering they can aspire to. Littles will learn how nine types of engineers design and build all sorts of things, from the tiny microcircuitry in your smartphone to large projects like dams and bridges that transform the very face of the planet. Part of the Little Leonardo's Fascinating World Series. Greg Paprocki works full-time as an illustrator and book designer. He has illustrated several Curious George books, as well as the BabyLit alphabet books and The Big Book of Superheroes. Bob Cooper is a veteran editor whose twenty-year career has found him working on everything from comic books to art, architecture, and children's titles.
#6
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The Boy Who Loved Math: The Improbable Life of Paul Erdos
Written by Deborah Heiligman & illustrated by LeUyen Pham
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-8
Most people think of mathematicians as solitary, working away in isolation. And, it's true, many of them do. But Paul Erdos never followed the usual path. At the age of four, he could ask you when you were born and then calculate the number of seconds you had been alive in his head. But he didn't learn to butter his own bread until he turned twenty. Instead, he traveled around the world, from one mathematician to the next, collaborating on an astonishing number of publications. With a simple, lyrical text and richly layered illustrations, this is a beautiful introduction to the world of math and a fascinating look at the unique character traits that made "Uncle Paul" a great man.
#7
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Adi Sorts with Variables
Written by Caroline Karanja & illustrated by Ben William Whitehouse
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
It's time to clean Adi's room! If only a computer could do it for her! That gives Adi and her best friend Gabi an idea-think like a coder! These scientific thinkers put on their computer coding caps and make cleaning up a snap by sorting with variables!
#8
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Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race
Written by Margot Lee Shetterly & illustrated by Laura Freeman
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Based on the New York Times bestselling book and the Academy Award–nominated movie, author Margot Lee Shetterly and illustrator Laura Freeman bring the incredibly inspiring true story of four black women who helped NASA launch men into space to picture book readers! Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden were good at math…really good. They participated in some of NASA's greatest successes, like providing the calculations for America's first journeys into space. And they did so during a time when being black and a woman limited what they could do. But they worked hard. They persisted. And they used their genius minds to change the world. In this beautifully illustrated picture book edition, we explore the story of four female African American mathematicians at NASA, known as "colored computers," and how they overcame gender and racial barriers to succeed in a highly challenging STEM-based career. "Finally, the extraordinary lives of four African American women who helped NASA put the first men in space is available for picture book readers," proclaims Brightly in their article "18 Must-Read Picture Books of 2018." "Will inspire girls and boys alike to love math, believe in themselves, and reach for the stars."
#9
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Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Math
Written by Bob Cooper & illustrated by Greg Paprocki and Bob Cooper
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
"Introduces kids to many of the basic concepts of mathematics, including their connection with so many things in our everyday lives."--Back cover.
#10
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Boy Who Dreamed of Infinity: A Tale of the Genius Ramanujan
Written by Amy Alznauer & illustrated by Daniel Miyares
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-9
**A young mathematical genius from India searches for the secrets hidden inside numbers -- and for someone who understands him -- in this gorgeous picture-book biography.** _A mango . . . is just one thing. But if I chop it in two, then chop the half in two, and keep on chopping, I get more and more bits, on and on, endlessly, to an infinity I could never ever reach._ In 1887 in India, a boy named Ramanujan is born with a passion for numbers. He sees numbers in the squares of light pricking his thatched roof and in the beasts dancing on the temple tower. He writes mathematics with his finger in the sand, across the pages of his notebooks, and with chalk on the temple floor. "What is small?" he wonders. "What is big?" Head in the clouds, Ramanujan struggles in school -- but his mother knows that her son and his ideas have a purpose. As he grows up, Ramanujan reinvents much of modern mathematics, but where in the world could he find someone to understand what he has conceived? Author Amy Alznauer gently introduces young readers to math concepts while Daniel Miyares's illustrations bring the wonder of Ramanujan's world to life in the inspiring real-life story of a boy who changed mathematics and science forever. Back matter includes a bibliography and an author's note recounting more of Ramanujan's life and accomplishments, as well as the author's father's remarkable discovery of Ramanujan's Lost Notebook.
Table of Contents
Scroll to books about Math and...

Books About Math and African Americans

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This Little Trailblazer: A Girl Power Primer
Written by Joan Holub & illustrated by Daniel Roode
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-5
Learn all about influential women who changed history in this engaging and colorful board book perfect for trailblazers-in-training! Paving the way to a future that’s bright. Helping the world with their skills, smarts, and might. Little trailblazers cause great big changes. In this follow up to This Little President and This Little Explorer, now even the youngest readers can learn all about great and empowering female trailblazers in history! Highlighting ten memorable women leaders who paved the way, parents and little ones alike will love this girl power primer full of fun, age-appropriate facts and bold illustrations.
Add to list
Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race
Written by Margot Lee Shetterly & illustrated by Laura Freeman
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Based on the New York Times bestselling book and the Academy Award–nominated movie, author Margot Lee Shetterly and illustrator Laura Freeman bring the incredibly inspiring true story of four black women who helped NASA launch men into space to picture book readers! Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden were good at math…really good. They participated in some of NASA's greatest successes, like providing the calculations for America's first journeys into space. And they did so during a time when being black and a woman limited what they could do. But they worked hard. They persisted. And they used their genius minds to change the world. In this beautifully illustrated picture book edition, we explore the story of four female African American mathematicians at NASA, known as "colored computers," and how they overcame gender and racial barriers to succeed in a highly challenging STEM-based career. "Finally, the extraordinary lives of four African American women who helped NASA put the first men in space is available for picture book readers," proclaims Brightly in their article "18 Must-Read Picture Books of 2018." "Will inspire girls and boys alike to love math, believe in themselves, and reach for the stars."
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Counting the Stars
Written by Lesa Cline-Ransome & illustrated by Raúl Colón
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Before John Glenn orbited the Earth or astronauts walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used their knowledge, pencils, adding machines, and writing paper to calculate the orbital mechanics needed to launch spacecraft. Katherine Johnson was one of these mathematicians who used trajectories and complex equations to chart the space program. Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws were in place in the early 1950s, Katherine worked analyzing data at the NACA (later NASA) Langley laboratory. In 1962, as NASA prepared for the orbital mission of John Glenn, Katherine Johnson was called upon and John Glenn said “get the girl” (Katherine Johnson) to run the numbers by hand to chart the complexity of the orbital flight. He knew that his flight couldn’t work without her unique skills. President Barack Obama awarded Katherine Johnson the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2015 and her incredible life inspired the Oscar-nominated film Hidden Figures. Get to know this incredible and inspirational woman with this beautifully illustrated picture book from an award-winning duo.
Honorable Mentions
Counting on Katherine: How Katherine Johnson Saved Apollo 13 book
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Katherine Johnson (You Should Meet) book
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A Computer Called Katherine book
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The Girl with a Mind for Math book
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  1. Counting on Katherine: How Katherine Johnson Saved Apollo 13 - The bold story of an African-American mathematician who worked for NASA during the space race and was depicted in the film “Hidden Figures, “ and how she made sure that the crew of Apollo 13 returned home. Full color.

  2. Katherine Johnson (You Should Meet) - Get to know the woman who made many of NASA’s early missions possible in this fascinating, nonfiction Level 3 Ready-to-Read, part of a series of biographies about people “you should meet!” Meet Katherine Johnson, a brilliant mathematician who worked at NASA in the early 1950s until retiring in 1986. Katherine’s unparalleled calculations (done by hand) helped plan the trajectories for NASA’s Mercury and Apollo missions (including the Apollo 11 moon landing). She is said to be one of the greatest American minds of all time. A special section at the back of the book includes extras on subjects like history and math, plus inspiring careers for math lovers. With the You Should Meet series, learning about historical figures has never been so much fun!

  3. A Computer Called Katherine - The inspiring true story of mathematician Katherine Johnson—made famous by the award-winning film Hidden Figures—who counted and computed her way to NASA and helped put a man on the moon! Katherine knew it was wrong that African Americans didn’t have the same rights as others—as wrong as 5+5=12. She knew it was wrong that people thought women could only be teachers or nurses—as wrong as 10-5=3. And she proved everyone wrong by zooming ahead of her classmates, starting college at fifteen, and eventually joining NASA, where her calculations helped pioneer America’s first manned flight into space, its first manned orbit of Earth, and the world’s first trip to the moon! Award-winning author Suzanne Slade and debut artist Veronica Miller Jamison tell the story of a NASA “computer” in this smartly written, charmingly illustrated biography.

  4. The Girl with a Mind for Math - Meet Raye Montague—the hidden mastermind who made waves in the U.S. Navy! After touring a German submarine in the early 1940s, young Raye set her sights on becoming an engineer. Little did she know sexism and racial inequality would challenge that dream every step of the way, even keeping her greatest career accomplishment a secret for decades. Through it all, the gifted mathematician persisted—finally gaining her well-deserved title in history: a pioneer who changed the course of ship design forever. The Girl With a Mind for Math: The Story of Raye Montague is the third book in a riveting educational series about the inspiring lives of amazing scientists. In addition to the illustrated rhyming tale, you’ll find a complete biography, fun facts, a colorful timeline of events, and even a note from Montague herself!

Books About Math and History

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Ada Lovelace
Written by Isabel Sanchez Vegara & illustrated by Zafouko Yamamoto
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-4
New, in the My First Little People, Big Dreams series: Introduce your littlest one to the world’s first computer programmer, Ada Lovelace. Told in simple sentences, this young reader edition of the best-selling series is perfect to read out loud to little dreamers. This empowering series celebrates the important life stories of wonderful women of the world – and is now in available in a board format for little hands! These books make the lives of these role models accessible for the youngest children, providing a powerful message to inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world!
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Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science
Written by Diane Stanley & illustrated by Jessie Hartland
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
From nonfiction stars Diane Stanley and Jessie Hartland comes a beautifully illustrated biography of Ada Lovelace, who is known as the first computer programmer. Two hundred years ago, a daughter was born to the famous poet, Lord Byron, and his mathematical wife, Annabella. Like her father, Ada had a vivid imagination and a creative gift for connecting ideas in original ways. Like her mother, she had a passion for science, math, and machines. It was a very good combination. Ada hoped that one day she could do something important with her creative and nimble mind. A hundred years before the dawn of the digital age, Ada Lovelace envisioned the computer-driven world we know today. And in demonstrating how the machine would be coded, she wrote the first computer program. She would go down in history as Ada Lovelace, the first computer programmer. Diane Stanley’s lyrical writing and Jessie Hartland’s vibrant illustrations capture the spirit of Ada Lovelace and bring her fascinating story vividly to life.
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Margaret and the Moon: How Margaret Hamilton Saved the First Lunar Landing
Written by Dean Robbins & illustrated by Lucy Knisley
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
A true story from one of the Women of NASA! Margaret Hamilton loved numbers as a young girl. She knew how many miles it was to the moon (and how many back). She loved studying algebra and geometry and calculus and using math to solve problems in the outside world. Soon math led her to MIT and then to helping NASA put a man on the moon! She handwrote code that would allow the spacecraft’s computer to solve any problems it might encounter. Apollo 8. Apollo 9. Apollo 10. Apollo 11. Without her code, none of those missions could have been completed. Dean Robbins and Lucy Knisley deliver a lovely portrayal of a pioneer in her field who never stopped reaching for the stars.
Honorable Mentions
Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine book
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Ada Lovelace book
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Carry On, Mr. Bowditch book
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Ada's Ideas book
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  1. Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine - Offers an illustrated telling of the story of Ada Byron Lovelace, from her early creative fascination with mathematics and science and her devastating bout with measles, to the ground-breaking algorithm she wrote for Charles Babbage’s analytical engine.

  2. Ada Lovelace - Meet Ada Lovelace, the British mathematician and daughter of poet Lord Byron. New in the Little People, Big Dreams series, this inspiring and informative little biography follows the colourful life of Lord Byron’s daughter, from her early love of logic, to her plans for the world’s first computer program. With stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, this empowering series celebrates the important life stories of wonderful women of the world. From designers and artists to scientists, all of them went on to achieve incredible things, yet all of them began life as a little child with a dream. These books make the lives of these role models accessible for children, providing a powerful message to inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world!

  3. Carry On, Mr. Bowditch - Readers today are still fascinated by “Nat,” an eighteenth-century nautical wonder and mathematical wizard. Nathaniel Bowditch grew up in a sailor’s world—Salem in the early days, when tall-masted ships from foreign ports crowded the wharves. But Nat didn’t promise to have the makings of a sailor; he was too physically small. Nat may have been slight of build, but no one guessed that he had the persistence and determination to master sea navigation in the days when men sailed only by “log, lead, and lookout.” Nat’s long hours of study and observation, collected in his famous work, The American Practical Navigator (also known as the “Sailors’ Bible”), stunned the sailing community and made him a New England hero.

  4. Ada's Ideas - Ada Lovelace (1815–1852) was the daughter of Lord Byron, a poet, and Anna Isabella Milbanke, a mathematician. Her parents separated when she was young, and her mother insisted on a logic-focused education, rejecting Byron’s “mad” love of poetry. But Ada remained fascinated with her father and considered mathematics “poetical science.” Via her friendship with inventor Charles Babbage, she became involved in “programming” his Analytical Engine, a precursor to the computer, thus becoming the world’s first computer programmer. This picture book biography of Ada Lovelace is a compelling portrait of a woman who saw the potential for numbers to make art.

Want to see books about history?

Books About Math and Numbers

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The World-Famous Book of Counting
Written & illustrated by Sarah Goodreau
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-7
Prepare to be amazed by this fabulously clever lift-the-flap, pop-up, pull-out book about numbers. Sarah Goodreau's magic-themed illustrations add a touch of nostalgia and vintage glamour to this fun and elegant counting book. With spectacular sorcery and sensational illusions, there's something here for magic lovers of all ages. A stylish lift-the-flap, pop-up, pull-out book about numbers with a magic theme
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TouchThinkLearn: Numbers
Written & illustrated by Xavier Deneux
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-3
Combining scooped-out die-cuts with raised, shaped elements, two new TouchThinkLearn books offer youngest learners an irresistible opportunity to explore their universe in a hands-on, multisensory way. See the image, trace its shape, say its name: these modes of perception combine in a dynamic way to stimulate understanding of essential concepts. Experience the number "2" both by counting a pair of raised car wheels on one side, and feeling its shape on the other. Featuring a format unlike any other, these groundbreaking books translate abstract thought into tangible knowledge.
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Ten Magic Butterflies
Written by Danica McKellar & illustrated by Jennifer Bricking
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3
Fairies, butterflies, and magic help to make this math-focused board book from the "New York Times"-bestselling author of "Goodnight, Numbers" and star of "The Wonder Years" positively enchanting! Full color.
Honorable Mentions
A Hundred Billion Trillion Stars book
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La Llorona - Counting Down / Contando Hacia Atras book
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What in the World? book
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100 Bugs! A Counting Book book
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  1. A Hundred Billion Trillion Stars - “This picture book is one in a gazillion.”—Jane O’Connor, the New York Times–bestselling author of the Fancy Nancy series Did you know that the earth is covered in three trillion trees? And that seven billion people weigh about the same as ten quadrillion ants? Our world is full of constantly changing numbers, from a hundred billion trillion stars in space to thirty-seven billion rabbits on Earth. Can you imagine that many of anything? The playful illustrations from New York Times–bestselling artist Isabel Greenberg and the friendly, straightforward voice of author Seth Fishman illuminate some of the biggest numbers in the universe—a hundred billion trillion stars—and the smallest—one unique and special YOU. Here is a book for story time, for science time, for math time, for bedtime, and all the times in between. Perfect for curious children, classrooms eager for STEM content, and readers who have devoured Ada Twist, Scientist and How Much Is a Million?

  2. La Llorona - Counting Down / Contando Hacia Atras - Inspired by one of the oldest folktales ever told, this book will introduce your little one to their first English and Spanish numbers and words.

  3. What in the World? - Discover nature by the numbers in this gorgeous, innovative counting book. The natural world is full of sets of numbers: from birds’ wings in twos and clover leaves in threes to deer hooves in fours and octopus arms in eights. This book uses playful rhyming text to explore these numerical sets in vibrant detail, ending with the stars in the sky—a number set too big to count!

  4. 100 Bugs! A Counting Book - A boy and girl find and count 100 different bugs in their backyard in increments of ten.

Want to see books about numbers?

Books About Math and Coding And Programming

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Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code
Written by Laurie Wallmark & illustrated by Katy Wu
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-9
Who was Grace Hopper? A software tester, workplace jester, cherished mentor, ace inventor, avid reader, naval leader—AND rule breaker, chance taker, and troublemaker. Acclaimed picture book author Laurie Wallmark (Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine) once again tells the riveting story of a trailblazing woman. Grace Hopper coined the term “computer bug” and taught computers to “speak English.” Throughout her life, Hopper succeeded in doing what no one had ever done before. Delighting in difficult ideas and in defying expectations, the insatiably curious Hopper truly was “Amazing Grace” . . . and a role model for science- and math-minded girls and boys. With a wealth of witty quotes, and richly detailed illustrations, this book brings Hopper's incredible accomplishments to life.
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Adi Sorts with Variables
Written by Caroline Karanja & illustrated by Ben William Whitehouse
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
It's time to clean Adi's room! If only a computer could do it for her! That gives Adi and her best friend Gabi an idea-think like a coder! These scientific thinkers put on their computer coding caps and make cleaning up a snap by sorting with variables!
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Baby Loves Coding
Written by Ruth Spiro & illustrated by Irene Chan
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-5
Big, brainy science for the littlest listeners Accurate enough to satisfy an expert, yet simple enough for baby, this clever board book showcases the use of logic, sequence, and patterns to solve problems. Can Baby think like a coder to fix her train? Beautiful, visually stimulating illustrations complement age-appropriate language to encourage baby's sense of wonder. Parents and caregivers may learn a thing or two, as well!
Honorable Mentions
Gabi's If/Then Garden book
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Gabi's Fabulous Functions book
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Who Says Women Can't Be Computer Programmers? book
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  1. Gabi's If/Then Garden - Gabi’s garden needs some help. Where to begin? Gabi and her best friend Adi use if/then statements to decide what to plant, what to water, and what to pick! These scientific thinkers find ways every day to use computer coding concepts to make work and play more fun!

  2. Gabi's Fabulous Functions - Computer coding in the kitchen? Yes! Best friends Gabi and Adi are baking a special birthday treat-and making a recipe is a lot like creating a function in a computer code. These scientifically minded junior programmers are always on the lookout for ways to work coding concepts into their day with Code Play!

  3. Who Says Women Can't Be Computer Programmers? - A picture book biography of Ada Lovelace, the woman recognized today as history’s first computer programmer—she imagined them 100 years before they existed! In the early nineteenth century lived Ada Byron: a young girl with a wild and wonderful imagination. The daughter of internationally acclaimed poet Lord Byron, Ada was tutored in science and mathematics from a very early age. But Ada’s imagination was never meant to be tamed and, armed with the fundamentals of math and engineering, she came into her own as a woman of ideas—equal parts mathematician and philosopher. From her whimsical beginnings as a gifted child to her most sophisticated notes on Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine, this book celebrates the woman recognized today as the first computer programmer. A Christy Ottaviano Book

Books About Math and Vocabulary

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Baby Loves Green Energy!
Written by Ruth Spiro & illustrated by Irene Chan
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-5
Big, brainy science for the littlest listeners. Accurate enough to satisfy an expert, yet simple enough for baby, this clever board book explores the climate of our planet and the need to protect it for all babies. Beautiful, visually stimulating illustrations complement age-appropriate language to encourage baby's sense of wonder. Parents and caregivers may learn a thing or two as well!
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ABC's of Mathematics
Written & illustrated by Chris Ferrie
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3
This alphabetical installment of the Baby University series is the perfect introduction for even the youngest mathematicians! A is for Addition B is for Base C is for Chord From addition to zero, The ABCs of Mathematics is a colorfully simple introduction for babies—and grownups—to a new math concept for every letter of the alphabet. Written by an expert, each page in this mathematical primer features multiple levels of text so the book grows along with your little mathematician
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Baby Loves Thermodynamics!
Written by Ruth Spiro & illustrated by Irene Chan
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-5
"The next two books in the Baby Loves series tackle the first law of thermodynamics (energy cannot be created or destroyed, but it can change forms) and Schreodinger's Cat, the famous thought experiment involving quantum theory (quantum physics states that a particle can exist in multiple places at once). Accurate enough to satisfy an expert and simple enough for the rest of us to comprehend, the Baby Loves board books are perfect for geeky moms and dads who want to share their love of science, for parents who want to give their infant a head start on Harvard, and for hipster aunts and uncles who want that oh-so-clever gift for the baby shower."--
Honorable Mentions
Baby Loves Structural Engineering! book
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Baby Loves Gravity book
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Quantum Information for Babies book
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100 First Words for Little Geniuses book
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  1. Baby Loves Structural Engineering! - Big, brainy science for the littlest listeners. Accurate enough to satisfy an expert, yet simple enough for baby, this clever board book explores the basics of building—from foundation to rooftop—and ties it all to baby’s world. Beautiful, visually stimulating illustrations complement age-appropriate language to encourage baby’s sense of wonder. Parents and caregivers may learn a thing or two, as well!

  2. Baby Loves Gravity - Big, brainy science for the littlest listeners. Accurate enough to satisfy an expert, yet simple enough for baby, this clever board book explores the ups and downs of gravity. When baby drops food from a high chair, why does it fall? Beautiful, visually stimulating illustrations complement age-appropriate language to encourage baby’s sense of wonder. Parents and caregivers may learn a thing or two, as well!

  3. Quantum Information for Babies - Simple explanations of complex ideas for your future genius! Written by an expert, Quantum Information for Babies is a colorfully simple introduction to one of the fastest-growing areas of technology research. Babies (and grownups!) will learn all about qubits, information systems, and more. With a tongue-in-cheek approach that adults will love, this installment of the Baby University board book series is the perfect way to introduce basic concepts to even the youngest scientists. After all, it’s never too early to become a quantum physicist! Baby University: It only takes a small spark to ignite a child’s mind.

  4. 100 First Words for Little Geniuses - Are you a theoretical physicist? An engineer? A mathematician? Then of course your baby will be a genius too. But where to begin? Introducing 100 First Words for Little Geniuses, a brainy primer for kids learning their first words! Forget apple and dog. Little geniuses are ready for quark, integral, and thermodynamics. From math to physics to philosophy, these are the words every budding genius needs in his or her vocabulary (even at the age of 2). Packed with fun illustrations and 100 words every genius baby should know, 100 First Words for Little Geniuses is the perfect board book for smart families everywhere.

Want to see books about vocabulary?

Books About Math and Science

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Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Engineering
Written by Bob Cooper & illustrated by Greg Paprocki
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
An introductory primer for kids focusing on the "E" portion of "STEAM" engineering. With original Renaissance man Leonardo da Vinci as inspiration, this exciting new volume in the Little Leonardo series introduces kids to many of the different types of engineering they can aspire to. Littles will learn how nine types of engineers design and build all sorts of things, from the tiny microcircuitry in your smartphone to large projects like dams and bridges that transform the very face of the planet. Part of the Little Leonardo's Fascinating World Series. Greg Paprocki works full-time as an illustrator and book designer. He has illustrated several Curious George books, as well as the BabyLit alphabet books and The Big Book of Superheroes. Bob Cooper is a veteran editor whose twenty-year career has found him working on everything from comic books to art, architecture, and children's titles.
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Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Math
Written by Bob Cooper & illustrated by Greg Paprocki and Bob Cooper
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
"Introduces kids to many of the basic concepts of mathematics, including their connection with so many things in our everyday lives."--Back cover.
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Snowman - Cold = Puddle
Written by Laura Purdie Salas & illustrated by Micha Archer
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Math is all around us, and in this clever and enlightening picture book, readers see how math, nature, and poetry intermingle and collaborate . . . well, naturally. Each clever equation is a tiny, perfect poem that prompts readers to look at the ordinary and see the miraculous. Can you look at an egg in a nest and see a jewelry box? How are sunlight and heat like an alarm clock? Engaging sidebars reveal the science behind the signs of spring.
Honorable Mentions
That's a Possibility! book
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Cece Loves Science and Adventure book
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  1. That's a Possibility! - Combines colorful photographs and interactive examples in an introduction to the science and math of probability that provides comprehensive explanations about games of chance and various easy-to-understand scenarios. By the author of Great Estimations.

  2. Cece Loves Science and Adventure - Cece loves being an Adventure Girl almost as much as she loves science, which is why she can’t wait for her troop’s camping trip. Nature is full of science for Cece to explore! Along with her friends, her mom, and her dog, Einstein, Cece learns how to pitch a tent, set up a campsite, and document landmarks on the trail. Then thunder booms in the distance! Working together, the girls use meteorology and math to determine the location of the storm; engineering to build a shelter; and technology and math to calculate the length of the trek back to the campsite. After all that teamwork, Cece’s mom gives them an Adventure Girl surprise!

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Books About Math and Friendship

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Martin McLean, Middle School Queen
Written by Alyssa Zaczek
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12
Seventh-grader Martin McLean has trouble expressing himself except at Mathletes competitions and now, as a female impersonator but his first-ever drag show falls on the same night as an important Mathletes tournament.
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How to Be on the Moon
Written & illustrated by Viviane Schwarz
picture book
Recommend Ages: 2-5
In the follow-up to How to Find Gold, best friends Anna and Crocodile are going on another intrepid adventure -- this time, to the moon. It's almost impossible to get to the moon. It's out in space, which is dark and empty, and it's very far away. If Anna and Crocodile are going to make it to the moon, they'll need some special skills, like being able to do math and having a lot of patience. They'll also need to build a rocket. Not to mention the sandwiches for the journey. Luckily, when Anna and Crocodile put their minds together, nothing can stand in their way. Full of the same cheerful charm that made How to Find Gold so endearing, Viviane Schwarz's pitch-perfect text and wonderfully colorful illustrations launch this story off the page in a true celebration of curiosity and the magic of imaginative play.
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Ada Lace and the Impossible Mission
Written by Emily Calandrelli and Tamson Weston & illustrated by Renee Kurilla
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-10
From Emily Calandrelli—Emmy-nominated host of Xploration Outer Space, correspondent on Bill Nye Saves the World, and graduate of MIT—comes the fourth novel in a fun illustrated chapter book series about an eight-year-old girl with a knack for science, math, and solving mysteries with technology. Third grader and inventor extraordinaire Ada Lace has a new social studies teacher—who loves group projects. While most of the class has constructed regular dioramas with clay and construction paper, Ada, her best friend Nina, and sometimes nemesis Milton have built a complex scale model of an historic silver mine. But when Milton reveals that he added his “old Milton touch” on their project right before turning it in, Ada worries that he has sabotaged their work. In a desperate attempt to save their project, Ada and Nina use their combined creative and technical prowess to perform a heist and break into their teacher’s supply closet after school. Do the two friends have what it takes to deceive the school’s security system? Or will they get caught trying to pull off this seemingly impossible mission.
Honorable Mentions
The Cookie Fiasco book
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Ellie, Engineer book
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Ada Lace And The Suspicious Artist book
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Ellie, Engineer: The Next Level book
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  1. The Cookie Fiasco - Four friends. Three cookies. One problem. Hippo, Croc, and the Squirrels are determined to have equal cookies for all! But how? There are only three cookies . . . and four of them! They need to act fast before nervous Hippo breaks all the cookies into crumbs!

  2. Ellie, Engineer - A charming, hilarious illustrated middle grade about a girl who is an engineer—perfect creative, STEM-powered fun for girls who have interests in how things work. “Look out, Junie B. Jones! Ellie the engineer is thinking, making, creating, and showing enthusiasm and brilliance with her creations!” —School Library Connection Ellie is an engineer. With a tool belt strapped over her favorite skirt (who says you can’t wear a dress and have two kinds of screwdrivers handy, just in case?), she invents and builds amazing creations in her backyard workshop. Together with her best friend Kit, Ellie can make anything. As Kit’s birthday nears, Ellie doesn’t know what gift to make until the girls overhear Kit’s mom talking about her present—the dog Kit always wanted! Ellie plans to make an amazing doghouse, but her plans grow so elaborate that she has to enlist help from the neighbor boys and crafty girls, even though the two groups don’t get along. Will Ellie be able to pull off her biggest project yet, all while keeping a secret from Kit? Illustrated with Ellie’s sketches and plans, and including a fun how-to guide to tools, this is a STEM- and friendship-powered story full of fun!

  3. Ada Lace And The Suspicious Artist - From Emily Calandrelli—Emmy-nominated host of Xploration Outer Space, correspondent on Bill Nye Saves the World, and graduate of MIT—comes the fifth novel in a fun illustrated chapter book series about an eight-year-old girl with a knack for science, math, and solving mysteries with technology. Third grader and inventor extraordinaire Ada Lace is on spring break. But it’s just a little less relaxing than she’d imagined. Nina is beside herself with excitement about meeting her favorite artist and enlists Ada and Mr. Peebles’s coding-whiz nephew to help revamp her online portfolio. When Nina finally meets Miroir, he snubs her, and her confidence is shaken—but not enough to miss the art show opening. While there, Ada spots a suspiciously familiar painting that may mean Miroir isn’t the original he claims to be. Will the friends be able to reveal the artist’s true nature, before he fools someone else?

  4. Ellie, Engineer: The Next Level - Ellie the Engineer is back in another charming, hilarious, illustrated story filled with creative, STEM-powered fun! “Look out, Junie B. Jones! Ellie the engineer is thinking, making, creating, and showing enthusiasm and brilliance with her creations!” -School Library Connection on Ellie, Engineer After Ellie’s first elevator build goes terribly wrong, her parents decide her “punishment” is to assist an elderly neighbor, Mrs. Curran, around the house. Ellie and her friends Kit and Toby are really only supposed to help with little things, but Ellie can’t turn down the opportunity to use her engineering skills here and there where she sees a need—because that’s what engineers do! It’s no fun, though, when Mrs. Curran always gives Toby the credit for all the ingenious projects, and acts like Kit and Ellie were just helping him. . . . Can Ellie come up with another great build to elevate Mrs. Curran’s ideas about this girl engineer? With Ellie’s designs and sketches throughout, and her fun guide to simple machines in the back, the continuation of this delightful series will leave young readers laughing and inspired to create.

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Books About Math and Counting And Numbers

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Groovy Joe: Dance Party Countdown
Written by Eric Litwin & illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5
_Groovy Joe is totally fun. He's a tail-wagging, song singing party of one! And he rocks like this: **Disco party bow wow!**_ #1 New York Times bestsellers Eric Litwin (_Pete the Cat: I Love My White Shoes_) and Tom Lichtenheld (_Goodnight, Goodnight, Construction Site_) are back in another groovy story that will have little ones singing, dancing, and learning math to a whole new beat. In his second book, Groovy Joe has a dance party. But **Oh no**! More and more doggies are knocking on his door, asking to come in. Will there be enough room for everyone? Joe knows just what to do and, soon enough, he everyone moving and grooving -- the party has only just begun! Signature rhyme, repetition, and musical writing style, combined with wild and witty illustrations infused and gentle math concepts come together to create an unforgettable new Groovy Joe story all about positivity, creativity, math, and kindness. Groovy Joe is back, ready to get _groovy_!
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Twinderella, a Fractioned Fairy Tale
Written & illustrated by Corey Rosen Schwartz
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Have you heard the story of Cinderella? Well, you don’t know the half of it. Cinderella had a twin sister, Tinderella. They each did half the housework, half the mending, and half the mean step-sister tending. But when they meet only one prince, what will they do? The whole story has twice the magic and double the fun! From the author The Three Ninja Pigs comes the fractioned fairy tale of Cinderella and her less-famous sister.
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Dinner at the Panda Palace
Written by Stephanie Calmenson & illustrated by Nadine Bernard Westcott
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7
Celebrate the 25th anniversary of Dinner at the Panda Palace! In this charming counting book, perfect for back to school, children will learn the importance of inclusion. Join one hungry elephant, two carsick lions, three pigs running from a wolf, and dozens of other playful yet famished animals as they swing, bound, and bounce into the Panda Palace for a hearty meal. But when the restaurant is totally full, will Panda make room for one more guest?
Honorable Mentions
365 Penguins book
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Ten Little Ladybugs Storybook book
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100 Snowmen book
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  1. 365 Penguins - The penguins are back! A slightly smaller trim size and all-new cover art give this classic, first published in 2006, a refreshed look. Full color.

  2. Ten Little Ladybugs Storybook - One by one, ten tactile bugs disappear. Where did they all go? Young ones will love finding out as they feel their way through the sturdy, colorful pages of this innovative book. The cute critters provide a hands-on learning experience and the rhyming text reinforces the counting concept. Interactive, educational, adorable—this magical countdown book adds up to a whole lot of fun.

  3. 100 Snowmen - 1 + 1 = 2 snowmen. 3 + 4 = 7 snowmen. 5 + 6 = 11 snowmen. Finally, 100 snowmen! As you count and add, watch the snowmen enjoy a snowball fight, make funny faces, play hide-and-seek— and just plain have fun. And you’ll have fun, too!

Books About Math and First Concepts

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How Many?
Written & illustrated by Christopher Danielson
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
"How Many? A Counting Book is a student book and accompanying teacher's guide that explore the essential mathematical ideas of units and place value."--
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I'm Trying to Love Math
Written & illustrated by Bethany Barton
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Children's Choice Award winner Bethany Barton applies her signature humor to the scariest subject of all- math! Do multiplication tables give you hives? Do you break out in a sweat when you see more than a few numbers hanging out together? Then I'm Trying to Love Math is for you! In her signature hilarious style, Bethany Barton introduces readers to the things (and people) that use math in amazing ways -- like music, and spacecraft, and even baking cookies! This isn't a how-to math book, it's a way to think differently about math as a necessary and cool part of our lives!
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ABCs of Engineering
Written & illustrated by Chris Ferrie
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3
A new book in the bestselling series with simple explanations of complex ideas for your future genius! It only takes a small spark to ignite a child's mind! The ABCs of Engineering introduces babies (and grown-ups!) to a new engineering concept for every letter of the alphabet - including entries for various aspects of engineering like mechanical, architectural, and beyond. With a tongue-in-cheek approach that adults will love, this installment of the Baby University board book series is the perfect way to introduce basic concepts to even the youngest mathematicians.
Honorable Mentions
Colors Lift & Learn book
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Which One Doesn't Belong? book
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  1. Colors Lift & Learn - Introduce preschool children to basic concepts like color identification with Colors Lift & Learn, a bold, colorful, new lap book. What things are red? What things are blue? Little hands will love to lift the flaps and discover what’s under each color in this engaging, interactive introduction to the concept of colors. This large-format lap board book is perfect for sharing and reading aloud, with big, bold illustrations and fun flaps that encourage kids to peek and play with each and every page. The Lap Board Concepts series from Walter Foster Jr. is the perfect way to introduce toddlers to the early concepts of reading, counting, and problem solving. With a colorful, contemporary style, this traditional lift-the-flap learning book will help preschool children learn shapes, numbers, and colors in an entertaining, exciting new way. Bold, colorful illustrations entice young readers (and listeners!) to flip through the pages again and again, each time with a new understanding of each shape, color, or number. A thoughtful gift for preschoolers that can be kept, handed down, and treasured for many years to come.

  2. Which One Doesn't Belong? - This is not your typical shapes book. This introducti on to geometry and mathemati cal thinking will excite young readers and make math a part of their everyday lives. Celebrated math educator Christopher Danielson encourages inquiry and criti cal thinking and sparks memorable mathematical conversati ons by asking which shape in each group does not belong. There’s no one right answer—the important thing is to have a reason why. Kids might describe the shapes as squished, smooshed, dented, or even goofy. But when they justi fy their thinking, they’re talking math!

Books About Math and Science And Nature

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What's the Matter with the Three Little Pigs?
Written by Thomas Kingsley Troupe & illustrated by Jomike Tejido
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
What's the matter with the three little pigs? They're being tormented by a hungry wolf! And no matter what kind of matter they use to build their homes, it doesn't matter. The STEM-savvy, rhyme-loving wolf in this fractured fairy tale always seems to spoil the day. A glossary and critical thinking questions support the story's physics content.
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Stars and Poppy Seeds
Written & illustrated by Romana Romanyshyn and Andriy Lesiv
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5
The charming story of a girl's greatest ambition--to count all the stars in the sky As the daughter of well-known mathematicians, Flora loves to count more than anything in the world. She counts all the things around her--the animals, grains of sand on the beach, and letters in her dad's newspaper. When Dora looks at the Milky Way, she begins to wonder how to count the mesmerizing number of stars. Is it even possible? Is the night sky so full of stars that even all the numbers she knows would not be enough to count them? Dora soon learns that she needs to deal with such a complicated task by starting with the simplest of steps, and who knows, maybe one day she will achieve her dream.
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Lifetime: The Amazing Numbers in Animal Lives
Written by Lola M. Schaefer & illustrated by Christopher Silas Neal
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
_In one lifetime, a caribou will shed 10 sets of antlers, a woodpecker will drill 30 roosting holes, a giraffe will wear 200 spots, a seahorse will birth 1,000 babies._ Count each one and many more while learning about the wondrous things that can happen in just one lifetime. This extraordinary book collects animal information not available anywhere else—and shows all 30 roosting holes, all 200 spots, and, yes!, all 1,000 baby seahorses in eye-catching illustrations. A book about picturing numbers and considering the endlessly fascinating lives all around us, _Lifetime_ is sure to delight young nature lovers.
Honorable Mentions
Hidden Figures Young Readers' Edition book
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Alan Turing book
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Statistical Physics for Babies book
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Quantum Computing for Babies book
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  1. Hidden Figures Young Readers' Edition - New York Times bestselling author Margot Lee Shetterly’s book is now available in a new edition perfect for young readers. This is the amazing true story of four African-American female mathematicians at NASA who helped achieve some of the greatest moments in our space program. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner. Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules, and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. This book brings to life the stories of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden, four African-American women who lived through the civil rights era, the Space Race, the Cold War, and the movement for gender equality, and whose work forever changed the face of NASA and the country.

  2. Alan Turing - In this book from the critically acclaimed, multimillion-copy best-selling Little People, BIG DREAMS series, discover the life of Alan Turing, the genius code cracker and father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence. Alan grew up in England, where his best friends were numbers and a little boy called Christopher. When his young friend died, Alan retreated to the world of numbers and codes, where he discovered how to crack the code of the Nazi Enigma machine. This moving book features stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, including a biographical timeline with historical photos and a detailed profile of the brilliant mathematician’s life. Little People, BIG DREAMS is a best-selling series of books and educational games that explore the lives of outstanding people, from designers and artists to scientists and activists. All of them achieved incredible things, yet each began life as a child with a dream. This empowering series offers inspiring messages to children of all ages, in a range of formats. The board books are told in simple sentences, perfect for reading aloud to babies and toddlers. The hardcover versions present expanded stories for beginning readers. Boxed gift sets allow you to collect a selection of the books by theme. Paper dolls, learning cards, matching games, and other fun learning tools provide even more ways to make the lives of these role models accessible to children. Inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world with Little People, BIG DREAMS!

  3. Statistical Physics for Babies - Simple explanations of complex ideas for your future genius! Written by an expert, Statistical Physics for Babies is a colorfully simple introduction to the second law of thermodynamics. Babies (and grownups!) will learn all about entropy, probability, and more. With a tongue-in-cheek approach that adults will love, this installment of the Baby University board book series is the perfect way to introduce basic concepts to even the youngest scientists. After all, it’s never too early to become a scientist! Baby University: It only takes a small spark to ignite a child’s mind.

  4. Quantum Computing for Babies - Simple explanations of complex ideas for your future genius! Written by experts, Quantum Computing for Babies is a colorfully simple introduction to the magical world of quantum computers. Babies (and grownups!) will discover the difference between bits and qubits and how quantum computers will change our future. With a tongue-in-cheek approach that adults will love, this installment of the Baby University board book series is the perfect way to introduce basic concepts to even the youngest scientists. After all, it’s never too early to become a quantum physicist! Baby University: It only takes a small spark to ignite a child’s mind.

Books About Math and Social Themes

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Last to Finish, a Story about the Smartest Boy in Math Class
Written by Barbara Esham & illustrated by Mike Gordon
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
The Adventures of Everyday Geniuses is meant to demonstrate various forms of learning, creativity, and intelligence. Each book introduces a realistic example of triumph over difficulty in a positive, humorous way that readers of all ages will enjoy! Max is convinced he will never succeed at memorizing his multiplication facts. When it's time for a test, one by one, Max's classmates turn in their finished papers before the timer rings. Not Max. As soon as the teacher starts the timer, his heart begins to pound, his hands begin to sweat, and his brain freezes! He is always the last to finish...and sometimes the other kids tease him about it. Is Max the worst math student ever? This positive story is perfect for anyone who has ever struggled with learning by memorization. Readers of all ages will discover that struggles don't always mean you're bad at something, but that maybe you just learn differently from others. "Children and teachers alike will celebrate the message, conveyed poignantly in Last to Finish, that 'mathematics is much more than memorizing math facts and taking timed tests'...Esham richly captures the dilemma when one such youngster encounters difficulties with memorizing math facts but, in fact, is a deep thinker of mathematics just the same. The reader will discover that the solution is both true and simple." --Dr. Susan Baum, The College of New Rochelle Professor Emeritus, Gifted Education Praise for the series: "This is a wonderful book series. Each story shows children that success is about effort and determination, that problems need not derail them, and that adults can understand their worries and struggles. My research demonstrates that these lessons are essential for children." --Dr. Carol S. Dweck
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The Lemonade War
Written & illustrated by Jacqueline Davies
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12
Evan Treski, who is people-smart, and his younger sister Jesse, who is math-smart, battle it out through competing lemonade stands, each trying to be the first to earn one hundred dollars.
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Absolutely One Thing
Written & illustrated by Lauren Child
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Count on Absolutely One Thing for a singularly funny look at simple math as encountered by Charlie and Lola. Sometimes, as a treat, Mom takes Charlie and Lola to the store and says they may choose one thing. "One thing to share?" Lola asks. No, it’s one thing each, explains Charlie, or two actual things between two. Lola is nine minutes late getting ready, and on the way, there are ladybugs and birds to count and maybe a squillion leaves on a tree. At the store, Lola says she’ll choose three things, or possibly two. "How about no things?" asks Mom. With Lola hilariously bending everyday numbers to her will, the math goes down easy in this charming picture book loaded with visual appeal.
Honorable Mentions
All of the Above book
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Bringing Down the Mouse book
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  1. All of the Above - Now with a new cover! A heart-warming, transformational story about a motley group of kids whose lives are changed by a math teacher’s challenge, written by award-winning author Shelley Pearsall with interior illustrations by Caldecott Medalist Javaka Steptoe. James Harris III, Rhondell, Sharice, and Marcel are four inner city students with a quest to build the world’s largest tetrahedron. Weaving together their different personal stories, their teacher, and the community that surrounds them, award winning author Shelley Pearsall has written a vividly engaging story about math, life and good-tasting barbecue. Filled with unexpected humor, poignant characters and quiet brilliance, All of the Above is based on a true story. Bonus content includes a revised authors note with photos, resources, and more!

  2. Bringing Down the Mouse - Charlie Lewis goes on a roller coaster ride of risk, math, and gaming in this middle grade novel that parallels the New York Times bestselling Bringing Down the House, which inspired the movie 21 with Kevin Spacey. Charlie Lewis is a nerd. All he’s ever been good at is math—and he’s really good at math. So good that he’s recruited by a group of kids determined to game the system at the biggest theme park in the world—and win the grand prize. Soon Charlie is caught up in the excitement and thrill of using his math skills for awesomeness…but what’s at stake may be more than he’s willing to risk. How far will Charlie go for a chance at the ultimate reward?

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