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Nocturnal Animals: Books For Kids

Looking for a list of the best kids books about nocturnal animals?

Children’s literature has many notable options when it comes to nocturnal animals. To help you find the right books for you and your young reader, we’ve compiled a list of the best kids books about nocturnal animals.

Our list includes board books, picture books, and chapter books. Board books are best for babies and toddlers from ages newborn to 2 or 3. Picture books are generally great options for toddlers and for preschool and kindergarten age children. Picture books are especially enjoyable for adults to read aloud with young kids. The chapter books on our list are generally best for elementary through early middle school age tween kids. You can filter to sort by the best book type for your kid, and you can also use our table of contents to jump to particular topics you think your kid will enjoy.

When it comes to children’s stories about nocturnal animals, there are a variety of titles. This list covers everything, from classics like Hedgehugs: Autumn Hide-and-Squeak to popular sellers like Stellaluna to some of our favorite hidden gems like A Boy Called Bat.

We hope this list of kids books about nocturnal animals can be a helpful resource for parents, teachers, and others searching for a new book! As you explore the list, please comment below to let us know what books you would add.

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Top 10 Books About Nocturnal Animals

#1
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A Boy Called Bat
Written by Elana K. Arnold & illustrated by Charles Santoso
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-10
The first book in a funny, heartfelt, and irresistible young middle grade series starring an unforgettable young boy on the autism spectrum, from acclaimed author Elana K. Arnold and with illustrations by Charles Santoso. For Bixby Alexander Tam (nicknamed Bat), life tends to be full of surprises—some of them good, some not so good. Today, though, is a good-surprise day. Bat’s mom, a veterinarian, has brought home a baby skunk, which she needs to take care of until she can hand him over to a wild-animal shelter. But the minute Bat meets the kit, he knows they belong together. And he’s got one month to show his mom that a baby skunk might just make a pretty terrific pet. "This sweet and thoughtful novel chronicles Bat’s experiences and challenges at school with friends and teachers and at home with his sister and divorced parents. Approachable for younger or reluctant readers while still delivering a powerful and thoughtful story" (from the review by Brightly.com, which named A Boy Called Bat a best book of 2017).
#2
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Sunrise, Moonrise
Written & illustrated by Betsy Thompson
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-4
Day turns into night and some animals drift to sleep while others spring to life in this beautiful high-contrast board book. Sun rises. Bird sings. And so the day begins in this beautifully simple board book with bold artwork and lyrical text that shows us the passing of time in the day. Fish swim under a blue sky, squirrels dream as the sun sets, the moon rises as stars blink, and an owl hoots when night falls. With word repetition and a single tree that houses both the bird who sings as the sun rises and the owl who hoots after the moon rises, little ones can begin to understand that the day begins and ends in the same way.
#3
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Stellaluna
Written & illustrated by Janell Cannon
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm
There's a reason this read is a popular one! A sweet baby fruit bat is lost after she and her mother were attacked by an owl. Taken in by a bird family, she tried to be the best bird she could be, even though she'd rather be sleeping upside down and didn't like to eat bugs. When she comes in contact with other bats, she ends up finding her real mother again, but she ends up with two families who love her for who she is.
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
Knocked from her mother’s safe embrace by an attacking owl, Stellaluna lands headfirst in a bird’s nest. This adorable baby fruit bat’s world is literally turned upside down when she is adopted by the occupants of the nest and adapts to their peculiar bird habits. Two pages of notes at the end of the story provide factual information about bats. “Delightful and informative but never didactic; a splendid debut.”--Kirkus Reviews For this anniversary edition, color has been added to the ink drawings and the interior design now allows for more art to be see. Plus there is a code for a downloadable crafts and activity kit, two pages of updated notes about bats, and a special note from the author.
#4
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Little Owl's Bedtime
Written by Karl Newson & illustrated by Migy Blanco
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-4
With a rhyming text that rolls off the tongue accompanied by beautiful illustrations, this book follows Little Owl on a magical night filled with shooting stars. As other animals settle down to sleep, Little Owl swoops around the sky, blowing out the stars to make way for the arrival of the sun and a new morning. When the other animals stir from their beds, it's time for Little Owl to fly home to get some sleep.
#5
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The Moon Keeper
Written & illustrated by Zosienka
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
**Fall in love with this moving and magical picture book about a sweet, conscientious polar bear, the moon, and the special connection they share.** Illustrated with a classic feel and told with a refreshing voice, *The Moon Keeper* is a perfect bedtime story with gentle messages about friendship, impermanence, and nature that will appeal to fans of *Kitten’s First Full Moon*, *Rabbit Moon*, and *Little Bear*. Emile, a very responsible polar bear, has a new job as moon keeper. He spends his evenings making sure the moon has everything it needs to shine its light over the night creatures. Night after night he keeps watch over the moon—clearing away the clouds and telling the fruit bats to move along when they play too close. Emile finds the moon nice to talk to in the stillness of the night. But what happens when the moon starts to change and slowly disappears? In a lovely and touching series of small investigations, consultations with neighbors, and a fair amount of worry, he learns that in life, things come and go—and it’s okay. Zosienka’s debut as author-illustrator is the rare moon-themed picture book that shows the phases of the moon through brilliant childlike storytelling.
#6
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Little Owl's Night
Written & illustrated by Divya Srinivasan
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3
It’s evening in the forest and Little Owl wakes up from his day-long sleep to watch his friends enjoying the night. Hedgehog sniffs for mushrooms, Skunk nibbles at berries, Frog croaks, and Cricket sings. A full moon rises and Little Owl can’t understand why anyone would want to miss it. Could the daytime be nearly as wonderful? Mama Owl begins to describe it to him, but as the sun comes up, Little Owl falls fast asleep. Putting a twist on the bedtime book, Little Owl’s Night is sure to comfort any child with a curiosity about the night.
#7
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The Night Flower: The Blooming of the Saguaro Cactus
Written & illustrated by Lara Hawthorne
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7
An exquisitely illustrated nonfiction picture book about a desert flower that blooms for just one night a year As the summer sun sets over the Sonoran desert in Arizona, wildlife gathers to witness a very special annual event. The night flower is about to bloom. For a few short hours, the desert is transformed into a riot of color and sound as mammals and insects congregate for this miracle of nature. Explore the fascinating desert ecosystem, from pollinating fruit bats to howling mice and reptilian monsters, in this beautiful nonfiction picture book.
#8
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Appleblossom the Possum
Written by Holly Goldberg Sloan & illustrated by Gary A. Rosen
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12
Mama has trained up her baby possums in the ways of their breed, and now it’s time for all of them—even little Appleblossom—to make their way in the world. Appleblossom knows the rules: she must never be seen during the day, and she must avoid cars, humans, and the dreaded hairies (sometimes known as dogs). Even so, Appleblossom decides to spy on a human family—and accidentally falls down their chimney! The curious Appleblossom, her faithful brothers—who launch a hilarious rescue mission—and even the little girl in the house have no idea how fascinating the big world can be. But they’re about to find out! With dynamic illustrations, a tight-knit family, and a glimpse at the world from a charming little marsupial’s point of view, this cozy animal story is a perfect read-aloud and a classic in the making.
#9
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Bats at the Beach
Written & illustrated by Brian Lies
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
On a night when the moon can grow no fatter, bats pack their moon-tan lotion, blankets, banjos, and baskets of treats and fly off for some fun where the foamy sea and soft sand meet. 15,000 first printing.
#10
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What's Next?
Written by Timothy Knapman & illustrated by Jane McGuinness
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5
An inquisitive baby badger is drawn to discover the world outside his den in an endearing, delightfully illustrated father-and-child story. Baby Badger sleeps all day in his snuggly burrow. When he wakes, he explores every nook of his home and wants to know “what’s next?” So Daddy takes him to the dark forest above to roll in soft moss and snuffle in bluebell bulbs and watch the silvery moon setting, a signal that night is ending and it’s time to go home. But if daytime is “what’s next,” how can Baby Badger sleep without seeing that? So he slips out alone to see the brilliant flowers and birds and to feel the yellow sun hot on his fur. Cozy illustrations and a child-friendly text depict a curious little creature dazzled by the world’s natural wonders — and a doting father who is there to guide him back if “what’s next” turns out to take him a bit too far.
Table of Contents
Scroll to books about Nocturnal Animals and...

Books About Nocturnal Animals and Science And Nature

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Sunrise, Moonrise
Written & illustrated by Betsy Thompson
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-4
Day turns into night and some animals drift to sleep while others spring to life in this beautiful high-contrast board book. Sun rises. Bird sings. And so the day begins in this beautifully simple board book with bold artwork and lyrical text that shows us the passing of time in the day. Fish swim under a blue sky, squirrels dream as the sun sets, the moon rises as stars blink, and an owl hoots when night falls. With word repetition and a single tree that houses both the bird who sings as the sun rises and the owl who hoots after the moon rises, little ones can begin to understand that the day begins and ends in the same way.
Add to list
The Moon Keeper
Written & illustrated by Zosienka
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
**Fall in love with this moving and magical picture book about a sweet, conscientious polar bear, the moon, and the special connection they share.** Illustrated with a classic feel and told with a refreshing voice, *The Moon Keeper* is a perfect bedtime story with gentle messages about friendship, impermanence, and nature that will appeal to fans of *Kitten’s First Full Moon*, *Rabbit Moon*, and *Little Bear*. Emile, a very responsible polar bear, has a new job as moon keeper. He spends his evenings making sure the moon has everything it needs to shine its light over the night creatures. Night after night he keeps watch over the moon—clearing away the clouds and telling the fruit bats to move along when they play too close. Emile finds the moon nice to talk to in the stillness of the night. But what happens when the moon starts to change and slowly disappears? In a lovely and touching series of small investigations, consultations with neighbors, and a fair amount of worry, he learns that in life, things come and go—and it’s okay. Zosienka’s debut as author-illustrator is the rare moon-themed picture book that shows the phases of the moon through brilliant childlike storytelling.
Add to list
Little Owl's Night
Written & illustrated by Divya Srinivasan
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3
It’s evening in the forest and Little Owl wakes up from his day-long sleep to watch his friends enjoying the night. Hedgehog sniffs for mushrooms, Skunk nibbles at berries, Frog croaks, and Cricket sings. A full moon rises and Little Owl can’t understand why anyone would want to miss it. Could the daytime be nearly as wonderful? Mama Owl begins to describe it to him, but as the sun comes up, Little Owl falls fast asleep. Putting a twist on the bedtime book, Little Owl’s Night is sure to comfort any child with a curiosity about the night.
Honorable Mentions
The Night Flower: The Blooming of the Saguaro Cactus book
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Night Animals book
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Bats book
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Science Comics: Bats book
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  1. The Night Flower: The Blooming of the Saguaro Cactus - An exquisitely illustrated nonfiction picture book about a desert flower that blooms for just one night a year As the summer sun sets over the Sonoran desert in Arizona, wildlife gathers to witness a very special annual event. The night flower is about to bloom. For a few short hours, the desert is transformed into a riot of color and sound as mammals and insects congregate for this miracle of nature. Explore the fascinating desert ecosystem, from pollinating fruit bats to howling mice and reptilian monsters, in this beautiful nonfiction picture book.

  2. Night Animals - Something’s out there in the dark! First Possum hears it. Then Skunk. Then Wolf comes running. ‘What could it possibly be?’ asks Bat. ‘Night Animals!’ the animals declare. ‘But you arenight animals,’ Bat informs this not-so-smart crew. Children will love the oh-so-funny animals in this twist on a cozy bedtime book.

  3. Bats - Presenting fascinating information on all kinds of bats, from how they use echoes to hear, to the legends that surround them and how to protect the species Though people often think of bats as scary, bats are really shy, gentle animals. There are nearly 1000 different species of bats, and they live on every continent except Antarctica. Some are tiny, but the giant flying fox bat has a five-foot wingspan! Popular science author Gail Gibbons also discusses the efforts to protect the world’s only truly flying mammals. A final page offers additional facts.

  4. Science Comics: Bats - Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic—dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you’re a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty year old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you! This volume: In Bats, we follow a little brown bat whose wing is injured by humans on a nature hike. He is taken to a bat rehabilitation center where he meets many different species of bats. They teach him how they fly, what they eat, and where they like to live.

Books About Nocturnal Animals and Bats

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Stellaluna
Written & illustrated by Janell Cannon
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm
There's a reason this read is a popular one! A sweet baby fruit bat is lost after she and her mother were attacked by an owl. Taken in by a bird family, she tried to be the best bird she could be, even though she'd rather be sleeping upside down and didn't like to eat bugs. When she comes in contact with other bats, she ends up finding her real mother again, but she ends up with two families who love her for who she is.
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
Knocked from her mother’s safe embrace by an attacking owl, Stellaluna lands headfirst in a bird’s nest. This adorable baby fruit bat’s world is literally turned upside down when she is adopted by the occupants of the nest and adapts to their peculiar bird habits. Two pages of notes at the end of the story provide factual information about bats. “Delightful and informative but never didactic; a splendid debut.”--Kirkus Reviews For this anniversary edition, color has been added to the ink drawings and the interior design now allows for more art to be see. Plus there is a code for a downloadable crafts and activity kit, two pages of updated notes about bats, and a special note from the author.
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Bats at the Beach
Written & illustrated by Brian Lies
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
On a night when the moon can grow no fatter, bats pack their moon-tan lotion, blankets, banjos, and baskets of treats and fly off for some fun where the foamy sea and soft sand meet. 15,000 first printing.
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Nightsong
Written by Ari Berk & illustrated by Loren Long
Thoughts from The Goodfather
The story will entertain young readers while also telling a deeper message of sharing your unique voice with the world and finding that others in return share with you and guide your journey. The illustrations depicting the night world that seems so strange and dark are excellent.
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8
Chiro, a young bat, is nervous about flying into the world for the first time without his mother, especially on a very dark night, but he soon learns to rely on his "song" to find his way and stay safe.
Honorable Mentions
Bats in the Band book
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Bats at the Ballgame book
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Bats at the Library book
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Bat Loves the Night book
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  1. Bats in the Band - When the weather warms up, bats take advantage of an empty theater to stage a concert.

  2. Bats at the Ballgame - On deck and ready for the spring lineup, New York Times bestselling author-illustrator Brian Lies’s ode to “batty” baseball fans. Hurry up! Come one—come all! We’re off to watch the bats play ball! You think humans are the only ones who enjoy America’s national pastime? Grab your bat—the other kind—and your mitt, because it’s a whole new ballgame when evening falls and bats come fluttering from the rafters to watch their all-stars compete. Get set to be transported to the right-side-up and upside-down world of bats at play, as imagined and illustrated by best-selling author-illustrator Brian Lies.

  3. Bats at the Library - Mr. Staccato -

    Bat night at the library! A cute story about a book filled evening at the library when these lucky bats discover that the librarian has left the window ajar. The cadence is a tad choppy but the illustrations and idea behind this book are fun for any bat lover.

  4. Bat Loves the Night - As nighttime falls, a pipistrelle bat wakes up, flies into the night, uses the echoes of her voice to navigate, hunts for her supper, and returns to her roost to feed her baby. Reprint.

Books About Nocturnal Animals and Owls

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Little Owl's Bedtime
Written by Karl Newson & illustrated by Migy Blanco
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-4
With a rhyming text that rolls off the tongue accompanied by beautiful illustrations, this book follows Little Owl on a magical night filled with shooting stars. As other animals settle down to sleep, Little Owl swoops around the sky, blowing out the stars to make way for the arrival of the sun and a new morning. When the other animals stir from their beds, it's time for Little Owl to fly home to get some sleep.
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Owl Bat Bat Owl
Written & illustrated by Marie-Louise Fitzpatrick
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7
An owl and a bat family endeavor to share living spaces on the same tree branch, where initial wariness is overcome by the curiosity of the families' babies on a wild and stormy night that compels them to set aside their apprehensions.
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Little Owl Lost
Written & illustrated by Chris Haughton
picture book
Recommend Ages: 2-5
Uh-oh! Little Owl has fallen from his nest and landed with a whump on the ground. Now he is lost, and his mommy is nowhere to be seen! With the earnest help of his new friend Squirrel, Little Owl goes in search of animals that fit his description of Mommy Owl. But while some are big (like a bear) or have pointy ears (like a bunny) or prominent eyes (like a frog), none of them have all the features that make up his mommy. Where could she be? A cast of adorable forest critters in neon-bright hues will engage little readers right up to the story’s comforting, gently wry conclusion.
Honorable Mentions
Owl Love You book
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The Fallen Star book
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Hoot and Peep book
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The Ominous Eye book
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  1. Owl Love You - Illustrations and simple, rhyming text reveal many ways to show love as a mother owl promises to play with, teach, protect, and care for her baby from sunset to sunrise.

  2. The Fallen Star - A Flabbergastifying adventure under the stars! The third humorous adventure in The Nocturnals, a deluxe, beautifully illustrated middle grade series.

  3. Hoot and Peep - In the night skies above Paris, an adorable young owl teaches her older brother about the power of imagination—and the unconditional love between siblings Hoot the owl is very excited for his little sister, Peep, to join him on the cathedral rooftops. She’s finally old enough to learn all his big brother owly wisdom: First, owls say hooo. Second, they always say hooo. Lastly, they ONLY say hooo! But why would Peep say hooo when she could say schweeepty peep or dingity dong? Why would she speak when she could sing? As she explores the breathtaking Parisian cityscape, Peep discovers so many inspiring sights and sounds—the ring of cathedral bells, the slap of waves on stone—that she can’t help but be swept up in the magic of it all. Hoot doesn’t understand Peep’s awe, until he takes a pause to listen . . . and realizes that you’re never too old to learn a little something new. From the beloved author/illustrator of the classic picture book Red Sled, this gorgeous read aloud celebrates the wonder found in little things—and in the hearts of dreamers, young and old.

  4. The Ominous Eye - A Flabbergastifying adventure under the stars! The second humorous adventure in The Nocturnals, a deluxe, beautifully illustrated middle grade series.

Want to see books about owls?

Books About Nocturnal Animals and Friendship

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Manny Loses His Fangs
Written & illustrated by Giuliano Ferri
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-7
The best thing about being a vampire bat is scaring all the other animals. With enough practice, Manny hopes to become the scariest vampire bat in the world. But his world is rocked when his baby fangs fall out, and no one thinks he's all that scary anymore. How will Manny handle this unexpected turn of events? This is a lighthearted look at what happens when things don't go the way we plan, and how friendship can spring up in the most unexpected ways.
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The Slithery Shakedown
Written by Tracey Hecht & illustrated by Kate Liebman
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 5-7
Now children ages 5-7 can join the trio of unlikely animal friends in a new Grow & Read Early Reader story with the Nocturnal Brigade.
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The Hidden Kingdom
Written by Tracey Hecht and Sarah Fieber & illustrated by Kate Liebman
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 7-12
The snappy dialogue and colorful characters are back. Join the trio of unlikely animals friends on a new mysterious adventure.
Honorable Mentions
Megabat and Fancy Cat book
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Megabat book
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Dewey Bob book
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Rabbit & Possum book
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  1. Megabat and Fancy Cat - Megabat returns, this time with a new nemesis: a very fancy cat. Can our tiny bat hero stop his Daniel’s heart from being stolen by this nefarious, fluffy villain? Megabat was looking forward to Christmas morning: presents, playing toys, smooshfruit and watching Star Wars. But then Daniel opened his last, most special present. Daniel thinks this might be the best Christmas present yet: a beautiful cat named Priscilla! He’s always wanted a pet. Megabat is not sure he likes this cat. She tastes most hairy. Daniel loves his new cat! She’s fun to play with, and she’s so soft and fluffy. Megabat is not soft OR fluffy. He’s not purebred and he doesn’t have a big, beautiful swishy tail. What if Daniel loves Priscilla more than Megabat? This is truly a disturbance in the Force. Megabat and Birdgirl must find a way to get rid of this trubble cat once and for all! Calamity ensues as Megabat and Birdgirl try to come up with ways to get rid of Priscilla. But is there more than meets the eye with this furry menace? Kass Reich’s adorable illustrations paired with Anna Humphrey’s hilarious text make for another unforgettable Megabat adventure.

  2. Megabat - A sweet and hilarious chapter book about a boy and a bat, two unlikely friends who bond over loneliness, jellyrolls and Darth Vader. Daniel Misumi has just moved to a new house. It’s big and old and far away from his friends and his life before. AND it’s haunted . . . or is it? Megabat was just napping on a papaya one day when he was stuffed in a box and shipped halfway across the world. Now he’s living in an old house far from home, feeling sorry for himself and accidentally scaring the people who live there. Daniel realizes it’s not a ghost in his new house. It’s a bat. And he can talk. And he’s actually kind of cute. Megabat realizes that not every human wants to whack him with a broom. This one shares his smooshfruit. Add some buttermelon, juice boxes, a lightsaber and a common enemy and you’ve got a new friendship in the making! This charming, funny story is brought to life by Kass Reich’s warm and adorable illustrations. There’s never been a bat this cute — readers will be rooting for Megabat and Daniel from page one!

  3. Dewey Bob - A sweet raccoon character stars in this endearing tale of unexpected friendship from the creator of the bestselling Skippyjon Jones Dewey Bob Crockett is a durn cute raccoon who lives by himself in a house filled to the brim with the wonderful objects he collects. Buttons, wheels, furniture and bricabrac adorn his cozy quarters and keep him busy as he finds and fixes, turning trash into treasures. But there’s something missing from Dewey’s collections—a friend! He tries gathering up some critters and bringing them home in his shopping cart, but that doesn’t work out so well. In the end, a friend does come Dewey’s way, and, with a little DIY help from this clever raccoon, returns again and again. Combining art and heart with storytelling genius and a lilting twang, Judy Schachner’s tale of unexpected friendship will delight readers young and old.

  4. Rabbit & Possum - Rabbit likes to leap before she looks. Possum is a little more cautious. Together, they are a dynamic duo ready to charm fans of Frog and Toad or Toot & Puddle! Rabbit has been preparing all day for her best friend Possum’s visit, but when the time comes she finds Possum fast asleep. No matter what Rabbit does, she just can’t wake him up. But then a rustle in the bushes frightens Possum and sends him up a tree—where he gets very, very stuck. Rabbit has any number of ideas to get him down. Unfortunately, they all make Possum a little…uneasy. But best friends never give up. With a little creativity—and a big surprise—Rabbit just might be able to save the day. These unlikely friends and their upbeat humor are just right for fans of Eric Rohmann’s My Friend Rabbit and Kelly Bingham’s Z Is for Moose.

Books About Nocturnal Animals and Nature

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What's Next?
Written by Timothy Knapman & illustrated by Jane McGuinness
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5
An inquisitive baby badger is drawn to discover the world outside his den in an endearing, delightfully illustrated father-and-child story. Baby Badger sleeps all day in his snuggly burrow. When he wakes, he explores every nook of his home and wants to know “what’s next?” So Daddy takes him to the dark forest above to roll in soft moss and snuffle in bluebell bulbs and watch the silvery moon setting, a signal that night is ending and it’s time to go home. But if daytime is “what’s next,” how can Baby Badger sleep without seeing that? So he slips out alone to see the brilliant flowers and birds and to feel the yellow sun hot on his fur. Cozy illustrations and a child-friendly text depict a curious little creature dazzled by the world’s natural wonders — and a doting father who is there to guide him back if “what’s next” turns out to take him a bit too far.
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A Is for Australian Animals
Written & illustrated by Frané Lessac
picture book
Recommend Ages: 7-9
There are so many amazing animals to be found in Australia -- and many of them are found nowhere else in the world. Discover thirty-eight of the weird and wonderful creatures of Down Under -- from the iconic kangaroo to the puzzling echidna; from the tiny crusader bug to the enormous saltwater crocodile; from the adorable quokka to the terrifying Tasmanian devil. Did you know that lyrebirds can mimic almost any sound? Or that an oblong turtle has the longest neck of any turtle in the world? Vibrant paintings and fascinating facts introduce readers to a wide array of incredible animals in this vivid celebration of the fauna that makes Australia unique.
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Prickly Hedgehogs!
Written & illustrated by Jane McGuinness
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
When the sun has set, Hedgehog’s day has only just begun. She’s out and about, snuffling through layers of leaves and twigs as she searches for bugs and other things to eat. Young animal lovers will enjoy following Hedgehog and her little hoglets through towns and gardens, parks and woodland, as they sniff-sniff-sniff for food. The facts threaded throughout this inviting story augment the charming illustrations and will satisfy the most inquisitive of readers.
Honorable Mentions
Twilight Chant book
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Daylight Starlight Wildlife book
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  1. Twilight Chant - As day slips softly into night, sharp eyes catch glimpses of the special creatures who are active at dusk. Lyrical text and lush art capture the richness and life of this magical time in a sumptuous picture book that will inspire budding naturalists and anyone who has ever chased a lightning bug at twilight. An author’s note about twilight is included.

  2. Daylight Starlight Wildlife - In amazingly lifelike, luminous paintings, Wendell Minor, one of America’s finest wildlife and landscape painters, reveals the variety of animals that surround us when we are awake and when we are sleeping. Minor’s vivid introduction to diurnal (daytime) and nocturnal (nighttime) creatures invites readers to experience the movements, sounds, colors, and textures of nature. By day a red-tailed hawk soars through sky, and by night a barn owl silently swoops through it. In the daylight a family of fluffy cottontail rabbits hops into a field to forage for food, and under starlight a family of pink-nosed opossums does the same. As day turns to night and night to day, amazing critters large and small come and go. Children will enjoy comparing and contrasting the roaming habits of the wonderful wildlife that surrounds us.

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