Science: Books For Kids

With all the current emphasis on STEM and STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Art Math), it's no wonder that in recent years there has been an explosion of kid-friendly books on science, and it's absolutely amazing! Now more than ever, children can have exposure to rather complex scientific concepts almost from birth, providing opportunities for their interest to be piqued across a variety of fields from biology and botany to physics and engineering. Many of these stories include the narratives of famous scientists as well, and their personal journeys to persevere against incredible odds to follow their passions and discover new things. Want to feed your burgeoning scientists' mind and introduce them to a variety of scientific disciplines? Without further ado, check out these awesome science titles!

Top 10 Books About Science

Ada Lovelace book
#1
Ada Lovelace
Written by Isabel Sanchez Vegara and illustrated by Zafouko Yamamoto
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-4
Thoughts from The Notorious RAD

This book helps inspire the next generation of great mathematicians. It shows young people that all are capable of doing great things.

New, in the My First Little People, Big Dreams series: Introduce your littlest one to the world’s first computer programmer, Ada Lovelace. Told in simple sentences, this young reader edition of the best-selling series is perfect to read out loud to little dreamers. This empowering series celebrates the important life stories of wonderful women of the world – and is now in available in a board format for little hands! These books make the lives of these role models accessible for the youngest children, providing a powerful message to inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world!

Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World book
#2
Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World
Written and illustrated by Rachel Ignotofsky
picture book
Recommend Ages: 10-15

It’s a scientific fact: Women rock! A charmingly illustrated and educational book, New York Times best seller Women in Science highlights the contributions of fifty notable women to the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) from the ancient to the modern world. Full of striking, singular art, this fascinating collection also contains infographics about relevant topics such as lab equipment, rates of women currently working in STEM fields, and an illustrated scientific glossary. The trailblazing women profiled include well-known figures like primatologist Jane Goodall, as well as lesser-known pioneers such as Katherine Johnson, the African-American physicist and mathematician who calculated the trajectory of the 1969 Apollo 11 mission to the moon. Women in Science celebrates the achievements of the intrepid women who have paved the way for the next generation of female engineers, biologists, mathematicians, doctors, astronauts, physicists, and more!

Joan Procter, Dragon Doctor book
#3
Joan Procter, Dragon Doctor
Written by Patricia Valdez and illustrated by Felicita Sala
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Back in the days of long skirts and afternoon teas, young Joan Procter entertained the most unusual party guests: slithery and scaly ones, who turned over teacups and crawled past the crumpets…. While other girls played with dolls, Joan preferred the company of reptiles. She carried her favorite lizard with her everywhere—she even brought a crocodile to school! When Joan grew older, she became the Curator of Reptiles at the British Museum. She went on to design the Reptile House at the London Zoo, including a home for the rumored-to-be-vicious komodo dragons. There, just like when she was a little girl, Joan hosted children’s tea parties—with her komodo dragon as the guest of honor.

Hedy Lamarr's Double Life book
#4
Hedy Lamarr's Double Life
Written by Laurie Wallmark and illustrated by Katy Wu
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-10

To her adoring public, Hedy Lamarr was a glamorous movie star. But in private, she was something more: a brilliant inventor. Now Laurie Wallmark and Katy Wu, who collaborated on Sterling's critically acclaimed picture-book biography Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code, tell the inspiring story of how, during World War Two, Lamarr developed a groundbreaking communications system that still remains essential to the security of today's technology.

On a Beam of Light book
#5
On a Beam of Light
Written by Jennifer Berne and illustrated by Vladimir Radunsky
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Follows the life of the famous physicist, from his early ideas to his groundbreaking theories.

Mary Had a Little Lab book
#6
Mary Had a Little Lab
Written by Sue Fliess and illustrated by Petros Bouloubasis
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Mary is an enterprising young inventor. She wants a pet, but it isn’t one she can easily buy…so she makes one with the Sheepinator! Mary’s pet sheep and her new invention make her popular with her classmates. But when she starts making sheep for her new friends, things go hilariously awry. Can Mary invent a way to fix this mess?

Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Engineering book
#7
Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Engineering
Written by Bob Cooper and illustrated by Greg Paprocki
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

An introductory primer for kids focusing on the "E" portion of "STEAM" engineering. With original Renaissance man Leonardo da Vinci as inspiration, this exciting new volume in the Little Leonardo series introduces kids to many of the different types of engineering they can aspire to. Littles will learn how nine types of engineers design and build all sorts of things, from the tiny microcircuitry in your smartphone to large projects like dams and bridges that transform the very face of the planet. Part of the Little Leonardo's Fascinating World Series. Greg Paprocki works full-time as an illustrator and book designer. He has illustrated several Curious George books, as well as the BabyLit alphabet books and The Big Book of Superheroes. Bob Cooper is a veteran editor whose twenty-year career has found him working on everything from comic books to art, architecture, and children's titles.

Mae Among the Stars book
#8
Mae Among the Stars
Written by Roda Ahmed and illustrated by Stasia Burrington
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

An Amazon Best Book of the Month A beautiful picture book for sharing, inspired by the life of the first African American woman to travel in space, Mae Jemison. A great classroom and bedtime read-aloud, Mae Among the Stars is the perfect book for young readers who have big dreams and even bigger hearts! When Little Mae was a child, she dreamed of dancing in space. She imagined herself surrounded by billions of stars, floating, gliding, and discovering. She wanted to be an astronaut. Her mom told her, "If you believe it, and work hard for it, anything is possible.” Little Mae’s curiosity, intelligence, and determination, matched with her parents' encouraging words, paved the way for her incredible success at NASA as the first African American woman to travel in space. This book will inspire other young girls to reach for the stars, to aspire for the impossible, and to persist with childlike imagination.

Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race book
#9
Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race
Written by Margot Lee Shetterly and illustrated by Laura Freeman
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Based on the New York Times bestselling book and the Academy Award–nominated movie, author Margot Lee Shetterly and illustrator Laura Freeman bring the incredibly inspiring true story of four black women who helped NASA launch men into space to picture book readers! Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden were good at math…really good. They participated in some of NASA's greatest successes, like providing the calculations for America's first journeys into space. And they did so during a time when being black and a woman limited what they could do. But they worked hard. They persisted. And they used their genius minds to change the world. In this beautifully illustrated picture book edition, we explore the story of four female African American mathematicians at NASA, known as "colored computers," and how they overcame gender and racial barriers to succeed in a highly challenging STEM-based career. "Finally, the extraordinary lives of four African American women who helped NASA put the first men in space is available for picture book readers," proclaims Brightly in their article "18 Must-Read Picture Books of 2018." "Will inspire girls and boys alike to love math, believe in themselves, and reach for the stars."

Baby Botanist book
#10
Baby Botanist
Written by Dr. Laura Gehl and illustrated by Daniel Wiseman
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-3

Baby Scientist is an adorable board book series that brings fun, accessible science concepts to baby’s world using simple language, recognizable settings, and vibrant art. Read them all with your baby scientist! Baby Botanist studies plants. In her lab coat, she looks at plants both large and small. She finds plants growing in many places.

Books About Science and Biography

Hedy Lamarr's Double Life book
#1
Hedy Lamarr's Double Life
Written by Laurie Wallmark and illustrated by Katy Wu
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-10

To her adoring public, Hedy Lamarr was a glamorous movie star. But in private, she was something more: a brilliant inventor. Now Laurie Wallmark and Katy Wu, who collaborated on Sterling's critically acclaimed picture-book biography Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code, tell the inspiring story of how, during World War Two, Lamarr developed a groundbreaking communications system that still remains essential to the security of today's technology.

Ada Lovelace book
#2
Ada Lovelace
Written by Isabel Sanchez Vegara and illustrated by Zafouko Yamamoto
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Meet Ada Lovelace, the British mathematician and daughter of poet Lord Byron. New in the Little People, Big Dreams series, this inspiring and informative little biography follows the colourful life of Lord Byron’s daughter, from her early love of logic, to her plans for the world's first computer program. With stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, this empowering series celebrates the important life stories of wonderful women of the world. From designers and artists to scientists, all of them went on to achieve incredible things, yet all of them began life as a little child with a dream. These books make the lives of these role models accessible for children, providing a powerful message to inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world!

Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean's Most Fearless Scientist book
#3
Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean's Most Fearless Scientist
Written by Jess Keating and illustrated by Marta Alvarez Miguens and Jess Keating
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

A beautifully illustrated biography of Eugenie Clark, a scientist as impressive as the sharks she studied At nine years old, Eugenie Clark developed an unexpected passion for sharks after a visit to the Battery Park Aquarium in New York City. At the time, sharks were seen as mindless killing machines, but Eugenie knew better and set out to prove it. Despite many obstacles in her path, including trying to break into the scientific field as a woman, Eugenie was able to study the creatures she loved so much. From her many discoveries to the shark-related myths she dispelled, Eugenie's wide scientific contributions led to the well-earned nickname "Shark Lady," as she become a fixture in the world of ocean conservation and shark research.

Honorable Mentions
  1. I am Jane Goodall - Learn all about Jane Goodall, the chimpanzee scientist.

  2. Marie Curie - At a time when women weren't welcome in the world of science, Marie Curie made her mark on history. She was the first woman to become a professor of physics in the Sorbonne and even won Nobel Prizes in two different scientific fields. This fascinating biography explains how Curie and her husband discovered both polonium and radium, and why their pioneering research on radioactivity was so important.

  3. Leonardo Da Vinci - Why could Leonardo da Vinci paint the human form so accurately, in all its beauty? How was he educated and trained as an artist? What inspired his most famous work, including The Last Supper and the Mona Lisa? And what fun machine did he invent? Find out about this unique artist and the many areas, from architecture to flight, he drew on and influenced.

  4. Stephen Hawking - Known for both his bestselling books and his work on black holes, physicist Stephen Hawking beat the odds and lived with ALS for longer than doctors ever expected. This engrossing biography shows why Hawking is an inspiring example of someone who pursued his dreams in spite of his disability. Follow his path to fame as he formulates his groundbreaking theory, expands our ideas about the universe, and becomes an admired "rock-star scientist."

Want to see more children's books about biography?

Books About Science and Alphabet (abc's)

ABC's of Science book
#1
ABC's of Science
Written and illustrated by Chris Ferrie
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3

This alphabetical installment of the Baby University series is the perfect introduction for even the youngest scientists! A is for Amoeba B is for Bond C is for Conductor From amoeba to zygote, The ABCs of Science is a colorfully simple introduction for babies—and grownups—to a new physics concept for every letter of the alphabet. Written by an expert, each page in this science primer features multiple levels of text so the book grows along with your little scientist.

ABCs of Engineering book
#2
ABCs of Engineering
Written and illustrated by Chris Ferrie
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3

A new book in the bestselling series with simple explanations of complex ideas for your future genius! It only takes a small spark to ignite a child's mind! The ABCs of Engineering introduces babies (and grown-ups!) to a new engineering concept for every letter of the alphabet - including entries for various aspects of engineering like mechanical, architectural, and beyond. With a tongue-in-cheek approach that adults will love, this installment of the Baby University board book series is the perfect way to introduce basic concepts to even the youngest mathematicians.

ABCs of Space book
#3
ABCs of Space
Written by Julia M. Kregenow and Chris Ferrie and illustrated by Chris Ferrie
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3

This alphabetical installment of the Baby University series is the perfect introduction for even the youngest astronomers! The ABCs of Space is a colorfully simple introduction for babies--and grownups--to a new astronomical concept for every letter of the alphabet. Written by an expert, each page in this mathematical primer features multiple levels of text so the book grows along with your little mathematician. Also in the Baby University Series: ABCs of Science ABCs of Physics Astrophysics for Babies Baby University: It only takes a small spark to ignite a child's mind.

Honorable Mentions
  1. A Is for Artichoke - This is so much more than an alphabet book! From artichokes to ganache and from oven to zest, this is a whimsical and informative introduction to words and kitchen concepts. Future chefs and food fans of all ages will delight in reading about everything kitchen-related! Three levels of learning means this book will grow with your little one from foodie basics to kitchen confidence! No other board book features ABCs and food in this way―and no other board book features the expertise of the cooks at America's Test Kitchen!

  2. ABCs of Biology - This alphabetical installment of the Baby University series is the perfect introduction for even the youngest biologist! A is for Anatomy B is for Bacteria C is for Cell From anatomy to zoology, the ABCs of Biology is a colorfully simple introduction for babies—and grownups—to a new biology concept for every letter of the alphabet. Written by two experts, each page in this biology primer features multiple levels of text so the book grows along with your little biologist.

  3. The Crab Alphabet Book - With his signature humor and amazing facts, best-selling author Jerry Pallott a offers a decapod for every letter of the alphabet. From A is for Arrow Crab to Z is for Zebra Hermit Crab, young scientists learn about a vast variety of crab species, their body parts, where they live, what they eat, and more. Did you know that the Imocaris is a fossil that scientists believe was the first crab to inhabit the earth?

  4. ABC's of Physics - This alphabetical installment of the Baby University series is the perfect introduction for even the youngest physicists! A is for Atom B is for Black Hole C is for Charge From atom to zero-point energy, The ABCs of Physics is a colorfully simple introduction for babies—and grownups—to a new physics concept for every letter of the alphabet. Written by an expert, each page in this physics primer features multiple levels of text so the book grows along with your little scientist.

Want to see more children's books about alphabet (abc's)?

Books About Science and Engineering

Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Engineering book
#1
Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Engineering
Written by Bob Cooper and illustrated by Greg Paprocki
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

An introductory primer for kids focusing on the "E" portion of "STEAM" engineering. With original Renaissance man Leonardo da Vinci as inspiration, this exciting new volume in the Little Leonardo series introduces kids to many of the different types of engineering they can aspire to. Littles will learn how nine types of engineers design and build all sorts of things, from the tiny microcircuitry in your smartphone to large projects like dams and bridges that transform the very face of the planet. Part of the Little Leonardo's Fascinating World Series. Greg Paprocki works full-time as an illustrator and book designer. He has illustrated several Curious George books, as well as the BabyLit alphabet books and The Big Book of Superheroes. Bob Cooper is a veteran editor whose twenty-year career has found him working on everything from comic books to art, architecture, and children's titles.

Rube Goldberg's Simple Normal Humdrum School Day book
#2
Rube Goldberg's Simple Normal Humdrum School Day
Written by Jennifer George and illustrated by Ed Steckley
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-7

If Rube’s inventions are any indication, “normal” means something very different in the Goldberg household. For Rube, up is down, in is out, and the simplest path to accomplishing an everyday task—like brushing his teeth or getting dressed—is a humorously complicated one. Follow Rube as he sets out on a typical school day, overcomplicating each and every step from the time he wakes up in the morning until the time he goes to bed at night. This book features fourteen inventions, each depicting an interactive sequence whose purpose is to help Rube accomplish mundane daily tasks: a simple way to get ready for school, to make breakfast, to do his homework, and so much more.

Baby Loves Aerospace Engineering! book
#3
Baby Loves Aerospace Engineering!
Written by Ruth Spiro and illustrated by Irene Chan
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-4
Thoughts from The Book Snob Mom

I LOVE the concept of teaching kids more difficult concepts in a simplified form via board books when they're little, in the hopes that it may subconsciously spark general curiosity or a specific interest. I think this book does a decent job of building concepts, but it's a lot more interesting to me as an adult to see how they're explaining these simplified concepts than it is to my toddler. That being said, there's a rocket ship at the end, so that helps ;) I could see this being great for a slightly older child!

Big, brainy science for the littlest listeners Accurate enough to satisfy an expert, yet simple enough for baby, this book explores the basics of flight - from birds, to planes and rockets - and ties it all to baby's world. Beautiful, visually stimulating illustrations complement age-appropriate language to encourage baby's sense of wonder. Parents and caregivers may learn a thing or two, as well!

Honorable Mentions
  1. Baby Loves Structural Engineering! - Big, brainy science for the littlest listeners. Accurate enough to satisfy an expert, yet simple enough for baby, this clever board book explores the basics of building--from foundation to rooftop--and ties it all to baby's world. Beautiful, visually stimulating illustrations complement age-appropriate language to encourage baby's sense of wonder. Parents and caregivers may learn a thing or two, as well!

  2. Ellie, Engineer - A charming, hilarious illustrated middle grade about a girl who is an engineer--perfect creative, STEM-powered fun for girls who have interests in how things work. "Look out, Junie B. Jones! Ellie the engineer is thinking, making, creating, and showing enthusiasm and brilliance with her creations!" --School Library Connection Ellie is an engineer. With a tool belt strapped over her favorite skirt (who says you can't wear a dress and have two kinds of screwdrivers handy, just in case?), she invents and builds amazing creations in her backyard workshop. Together with her best friend Kit, Ellie can make anything. As Kit's birthday nears, Ellie doesn't know what gift to make until the girls overhear Kit's mom talking about her present--the dog Kit always wanted! Ellie plans to make an amazing doghouse, but her plans grow so elaborate that she has to enlist help from the neighbor boys and crafty girls, even though the two groups don't get along. Will Ellie be able to pull off her biggest project yet, all while keeping a secret from Kit? Illustrated with Ellie's sketches and plans, and including a fun how-to guide to tools, this is a STEM- and friendship-powered story full of fun!

Want to see more children's books about engineering?

Books About Science and Inventions

Rosie Revere and the Raucous Riveters book
#1
Rosie Revere and the Raucous Riveters
Written and illustrated by Andrea Beaty
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-9

Rosie Revere is no stranger to flops and fails, kerfuffles and catastrophes. After all, she’s an engineer, and engineering is all about perseverance! But sometimes, Rosie has a really important project to tackle—one that feels much bigger than herself. When Rosie’s beloved Aunt Rose and her pals the Raucous Riveters—a gaggle of fun-loving gals who built airplanes during World War II—need her help, it’s up to Rosie to save the day. Will Rosie be able to invent a contraption to help one of the Riveters paint in the annual mural competition? After one flop . . . then another . . . and another . . . Rosie starts to lose hope. But thanks to some help from her classmates Iggy Peck and Ada Twist, Rosie creates the Paintapolooza! and, along with the Riveters, rediscovers the meaning of Home.

This Little Scientist: A Discovery Primer book
#2
This Little Scientist: A Discovery Primer
Written by Joan Holub and illustrated by Daniel Roode
board book
Recommend Ages: 3-5
Thoughts from The Book Snob Mom

The whole "This Little..." series so far has been excellent, and this is no exception. Jam-packed with famous scientists and innovators, This Little Scientist does a great job of featuring a broad spectrum of great minds of diverse backgrounds and areas of expertise all throughout history. One of my favorite things about this book is that it teaches real science and history with cadence and rhyme that makes it easy to learn and since it's enjoyable to read again and again... it starts to stick! Another big plus of this book for me is that depending on a child's current attention level you can choose to read just the left-hand pages, just the right-hand pages, or both, and the flow is great any way you do it!

Learn all about scientists who changed history in this engaging and colorful board book perfect for inventors-in-training! Asking why. Then making a guess. Asking how. Then proving with tests. Little scientists make great big discoveries. In this follow up to This Little President, This Little Explorer, and This Little Trailblazer now even the youngest readers can learn all about great and empowering scientists in history! Highlighting ten memorable scientists who paved the way, parents and little ones alike will love this discovery primer full of fun, age-appropriate facts and bold illustrations.

Ellie, Engineer: In the Spotlight book
#3
Ellie, Engineer: In the Spotlight
Written by Jackson Pearce
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Ellie the Engineer is back in a third charming, hilarious, illustrated story filled with creative, STEM-powered fun! "Look out, Junie B. Jones! Ellie the engineer is thinking, making, creating, and showing enthusiasm and brilliance with her creations!" - School Library Connection on Ellie, Engineer Ellie enters a pageant with her best friend Kit, which means lots of glitter, hairspray, and chances to make new friends. After all, Ellie has lots of engineering ideas to help the other girls with their talents, like building a light-up skateboard ramp for Kit! But one contestant, Kit's not-so-nice pageant rival Melody, makes fun of Ellie's tool belt and thinks engineering is messy. And when Melody's rabbit--part of her magic act--goes missing, Ellie knows that she can build a contraption to catch him. But Melody's comments have made Ellie start to doubt herself--what if a pageant isn't a place for engineering? With Ellie's designs and sketches throughout, and her fun guide to electricity and circuits in the back, the continuation of this delightful series will leave young readers laughing and inspired to create.

Honorable Mentions
  1. Manfish - Poetic text and full color paintings combine to create a portrait of the internationally known oceanographer as a curious little boy whose love of the ocean inspired him to grow up to become a champion of the seas.

  2. How to Become an Accidental Genius - Don’t be afraid to try! Make connections! Be persistent! Ask questions and never take no for an answer! Learn the secrets and amazing stories of successful inventors! How to Become an Accidental Genius is full of inspiring tales of famous and lesserknown inventors who have changed the world, from George Washington Carver, Mary Anderson (inventor of the windshield wiper) and inventor and actress Hedy Lamarr to Frank Epperson (of Popsicle fame) and Mary Sherman Morgan (The Woman Who Saved the U.S. Space Race). Readers will be amazed at the inventiveness of these geniuses. The book focuses on inventors from North America but includes stories from around the world. Organized into eleven chapters that highlight the qualities inventors have in common, the book also features profiles of inventive kids and teenagers.

  3. Albert Einstein - Join Albert Einstein on his journey of scientific discovery and see how the Nobel Prize winner forever changed how we think about energy, gravity, and the world around us. Kids will learn about Einstein's training, his struggle to find a teaching job, and how he developed his theory of relativity. The book also looks at his personal life, including his family, emigration to America, and love of music.

  4. Professor McQuark and the Oojamaflip - One day a fantastic idea pops into Professor McQuark’s head to create an ‘Oojamaflip’ but what is one and will it win her first prize at the town science fair? A fast-paced, rhyming tale superbly written by first-time author Lou Treleaven and illustrated by the talented Julia Patton.

Want to see 15 more children's books about science and inventions?

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Books About Science and Nature

Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Science book
#1
Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Science
Written by Bob Cooper and illustrated by Greg Paprocki
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Little Leonardo s Fascinating World of Science introduces kids to the vast and varied areas of science and the different types of scientists they can aspire to become. Whether it s ancient dinosaur bones unearthed by paleontologists, anthropologists studying different cultures around the globe, or new planets discovered by astronomers, there s bound to be something here any child will find fascinating and appealing.

Caterpillar and Bean book
#2
Caterpillar and Bean
Written by Martin Jenkins and illustrated by Hannah Tolson
picture book
Recommend Ages: 2-5

Observe the ways plants and insects interact in a gentle introduction to growing for budding scientists. What's that wedged in a crack in the ground, small and hard and wrinkly and brown? A bean seed! Soon it develops roots and leaves. And what's that on the leaf? An egg! The egg hatches a caterpillar, and the caterpillar eats the leaves, getting bigger and bigger until it forms a chrysalis. Meanwhile, the plant is growing, too: it develops flowers, then bean pods, as it reaches up toward the sun. Side by side, plant and insect grow . . . and grow . . . and grow throughout the year, until they come full circle. This fourth book in the First Science Storybook series uses simple, clear language and colorful illustrations to inspire very young readers as they learn about life cycles.

The Street Beneath My Feet book
#3
The Street Beneath My Feet
Written by Charlotte Guillain and illustrated by Yuval Zommer
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

This double-sided foldout book takes you on a fascinating journey deep underground. One side of the foldout shows the ground beneath the city, whilst the other side of the foldout shows the ground beneath the countryside. The scenes in the book, by the widely acclaimed illustrator Yuval Zommer, are continuous, so contrasting underground sections, from tunnels and pipes to burrowing creatures, layers of rock to the planet’s molten core, run seamlessly into the next. Mixing urban and rural settings, as well as Geology, Archaeology and Natural History, The Street Beneath My Feet offers children the opportunity to explore their world in a detailed learning experience. And its fold-out, ‘Laperello’ style, which extends to 2.5 metres in length, is great fun to spread out on the floor and really get involved!

Honorable Mentions
  1. The Magic and Mystery of Trees - Learn about the amazing natural science of trees in this illustrated nature and science book. From the highest branch and leaf down to the complex "wood wide web" of roots, every part of a tree plays an important role in its own growth and the habitat of the whole forest or woodland. Did you know that trees take care of each other and that the whole forest is connected? The Magic and Mystery of Trees takes children on a fascinating journey of exploration, showing them just how special these mighty organisms are. Discover how they communicate and warn each other of predators, how they nurture their networks, record the past, and anticipate the future to ensure their survival. Learn unbe-leaf-able tree facts, meet extraordinary trees from around the world and the animals that call them home. Find out what trees do for us and how we are damaging them with pollution and deforestation. But it's not too late to do something about it and you'll find out how you can help with instructions on how to plant your very own tree!

  2. Science Comics: Bats - Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic—dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty year old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you! This volume: In Bats, we follow a little brown bat whose wing is injured by humans on a nature hike. He is taken to a bat rehabilitation center where he meets many different species of bats. They teach him how they fly, what they eat, and where they like to live.

  3. One Day a Dot - One Day a Dot explores the age-old question: Where did we come from? Where did everything come from? Starting with one tiny dot and continuing through the Big Bang to the rise of human societies, the story of our universe is told in simple and vivid terms. But the biggest question of all cannot be answered: Where did that one dot come from? One Day a Dot is a beautiful and vibrant picture book that uses the visual motif of circles as to guide young readers through the stages of life on Earth.

  4. How to Survive As a Firefly - Listen up, larvae! I've been in the trenches for the last year and a half, and let me tell you, there is danger lurking behind every tree and headlight. With my expertise, you'll learn how to hunt your first meal (snail soup anyone?), what makes your abdomen glow (put down the fire extinguisher!), and how to react when your mate wants to eat you for dinner (who knew fireflies could be cannibals?). Buck up, buttercup you're in for the flight of your life! If you know what s good for you, you'll stop goofing around and pay attention to How to Survive as a Firefly, or you might never make it to adulthood! How to Survive as a Firefly provides a unique take on insect science that will entertain and educate in and out of the classroom. Full of opportunities for extended learning, this book includes fun facts hidden throughout the hilarious illustrated story and after, a glossary of important terms and some real firefly photos. If you've ever wondered how these fascinating beetles grow and glow and you like to laugh while you learn this book is for you!

Want to see 10 more children's books about science and nature?

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Books About Science and Vocabulary

100 First Words for Little Geniuses book
#1
100 First Words for Little Geniuses
Written by Tyler Jorden and illustrated by Kyle Kershner
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-4

Are you a theoretical physicist? An engineer? A mathematician? Then of course your baby will be a genius too. But where to begin? Introducing 100 First Words for Little Geniuses, a brainy primer for kids learning their first words! Forget apple and dog. Little geniuses are ready for quark, integral, and thermodynamics. From math to physics to philosophy, these are the words every budding genius needs in his or her vocabulary (even at the age of 2). Packed with fun illustrations and 100 words every genius baby should know, 100 First Words for Little Geniuses is the perfect board book for smart families everywhere.

Baby Loves Green Energy! book
#2
Baby Loves Green Energy!
Written by Ruth Spiro and illustrated by Irene Chan
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-5

Big, brainy science for the littlest listeners. Accurate enough to satisfy an expert, yet simple enough for baby, this clever board book explores the climate of our planet and the need to protect it for all babies. Beautiful, visually stimulating illustrations complement age-appropriate language to encourage baby's sense of wonder. Parents and caregivers may learn a thing or two as well!

Evolution for Babies book
#3
Evolution for Babies
Written by Cara Florance and Chris Ferrie and illustrated by Chris Ferrie
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-3

Overview Evolution for Babies by Chris Ferrie, Cara Florance Simple explanations of complex ideas for your future genius! Written by an expert, Evolution for Babies is a colorfully simple introduction to evolutionary biology. Babies (and grownups!) will learn how organisms mutate, evolve, and survive. Co-written by Cara Florance, who has a PhD in Biochemistry and a BS in Chemistry with work experience in astrobiololgy and radiation decontamination. With a tongue-in-cheek approach that adults will love, this installment of the Baby University board book series is the perfect way to introduce basic concepts to even the youngest scientists. After all, it's never too early to become a scientist!

Honorable Mentions
  1. Baby Loves Thermodynamics! - "The next two books in the Baby Loves series tackle the first law of thermodynamics (energy cannot be created or destroyed, but it can change forms) and Schreodinger's Cat, the famous thought experiment involving quantum theory (quantum physics states that a particle can exist in multiple places at once). Accurate enough to satisfy an expert and simple enough for the rest of us to comprehend, the Baby Loves board books are perfect for geeky moms and dads who want to share their love of science, for parents who want to give their infant a head start on Harvard, and for hipster aunts and uncles who want that oh-so-clever gift for the baby shower."--

  2. Quantum Information for Babies - Simple explanations of complex ideas for your future genius! Written by an expert, Quantum Information for Babies is a colorfully simple introduction to one of the fastest-growing areas of technology research. Babies (and grownups!) will learn all about qubits, information systems, and more. With a tongue-in-cheek approach that adults will love, this installment of the Baby University board book series is the perfect way to introduce basic concepts to even the youngest scientists. After all, it's never too early to become a quantum physicist! Baby University: It only takes a small spark to ignite a child's mind.

  3. Organic Chemistry for Babies - Simple explanations of complex ideas for your future genius! Written by an expert, Organic Chemistry for Babiesis a colorfully simple introduction to the structure of organic, carbon-containing compounds and materials. Babies (and grownups!) be one step ahead of pre-med students. Co-written by Cara Florance, who has a PhD in Biochemistry and a BS in Chemistry with work experience in astrobiololgy and radiation decontamination. With a tongue-in-cheek approach that adults will love, this installment of the Baby University board book series is the perfect way to introduce basic concepts to even the youngest scientists. After all, it's never too early to become a scientist! Baby University: It only takes a small spark to ignite a child's mind.

  4. General Relativity for Babies - Simple explanations of complex ideas for your future genius! This accessible introduction to Albert Einstein's theory of relativity will teach babies (and adults) about mass, spacetime, and black holes. With Baby University: It only takes a small spark to ignite a child's mind.

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Books About Science and Female Role Models

Rosie Revere, Engineer book
#1
Rosie Revere, Engineer
Written by Andrea Beaty and illustrated by David Roberts
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm

I love this book! The fun and colorful illustrations and rhyme text are wonderful, but the story and message are the best. Rosie's a great female role-model and I love that she learns the great lesson that "the only true failure can come if you quit." Even when embarrassment or failure hold her back, she keeps on trying and recognizes that failure is a step towards success!

Rosie may seem quiet during the day, but at night she’s a brilliant inventor of gizmos and gadgets who dreams of becoming a great engineer. When her great-great-aunt Rose (Rosie the Riveter) comes for a visit and mentions her one unfinished goal—to fly—Rosie sets to work building a contraption to make her aunt’s dream come true. But when her contraption doesn’t fly but rather hovers for a moment and then crashes, Rosie deems the invention a failure. On the contrary, Aunt Rose insists that Rosie’s contraption was a raging success: you can only truly fail, she explains, if you quit. From the powerhouse author-illustrator team of Iggy Peck, Architect comes Rosie Revere, Engineer, another charming, witty picture book about believing in yourself and pursuing your passion. Ada Twist, Scientist, the companion picture book featuring the next kid from Iggy Peck's class, is available in September 2016.

Me . . . Jane book
#2
Me . . . Jane
Written and illustrated by Patrick McDonnell
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7

In his characteristic heartwarming style, Patrick McDonnell tells the story of the young Jane Goodall and her special childhood toy chimpanzee named Jubilee. As the young Jane observes the natural world around her with wonder, she dreams of "a life living with and helping all animals," until one day she finds that her dream has come true. One of the world's most inspiring women, Dr. Jane Goodall is a renowned humanitarian, conservationist, animal activist, environmentalist, and United Nations Messenger of Peace. In 1977 she founded the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI), a global nonprofit organization that empowers people to make a difference for all living things. With anecdotes taken directly from Jane Goodall's autobiography, McDonnell makes this very true story accessible for the very young--and young at heart.

The Tree Lady book
#3
The Tree Lady
Written by H. Joseph Hopkins and illustrated by Jill McElmurry
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-10

Unearth the true story of green-thumbed pioneer and activist Kate Sessions, who helped San Diego grow from a dry desert town into a lush, leafy city known for its gorgeous parks and gardens. Katherine Olivia Sessions never thought she’d live in a place without trees. After all, Kate grew up among the towering pines and redwoods of Northern California. But after becoming the first woman to graduate from the University of California with a degree in science, she took a job as a teacher far south in the dry desert town of San Diego. Where there were almost no trees. Kate decided that San Diego needed trees more than anything else. So this trailblazing young woman singlehandedly started a massive movement that transformed the town into the green, garden-filled oasis it is today. Now, more than 100 years after Kate first arrived in San Diego, her gorgeous gardens and parks can be found all over the city. Part fascinating biography, part inspirational story, this moving picture book about following your dreams, using your talents, and staying strong in the face of adversity is sure to resonate with readers young and old.

Honorable Mentions
  1. Queen of Physics: How Wu Chien Shiung Helped Unlock the Secrets of the Atom - "When Wu Chien Shiung was born in China 100 years ago, girls did not attend school. But her parents named their daughter "Courageous Hero" and encouraged her love of science. This biography follows Wu as she battles sexism at home and racism in the United States of America to become what Newsweek magazine called the "Queen of Physics" for her work on how atoms split"--

  2. Margaret and the Moon: How Margaret Hamilton Saved the First Lunar Landing - A true story from one of the Women of NASA! Margaret Hamilton loved numbers as a young girl. She knew how many miles it was to the moon (and how many back). She loved studying algebra and geometry and calculus and using math to solve problems in the outside world. Soon math led her to MIT and then to helping NASA put a man on the moon! She handwrote code that would allow the spacecraft’s computer to solve any problems it might encounter. Apollo 8. Apollo 9. Apollo 10. Apollo 11. Without her code, none of those missions could have been completed. Dean Robbins and Lucy Knisley deliver a lovely portrayal of a pioneer in her field who never stopped reaching for the stars.

  3. The Bluest of Blues - A gorgeous picture book biography of botanist and photographer Anna Atkins--the first person to ever publish a book of photography After losing her mother very early in life, Anna Atkins (1799-1871) was raised by her loving father. He gave her a scientific education, which was highly unusual for women and girls in the early 19th century. Fascinated with the plant life around her, Anna became a botanist. She recorded all her findings in detailed illustrations and engravings, until the invention of cyanotype photography in 1842. Anna used this new technology in order to catalogue plant specimens--a true marriage of science and art. In 1843, Anna published the book Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions with handwritten text and cyanotype photographs. It is considered the first book of photographs ever published. Weaving together histories of women, science, and art, The Bluest of Blues will inspire young readers to embark on their own journeys of discovery and creativity.

  4. Always Looking Up - This empowering picture book biography tells the story of Nancy Grace Roman, the astronomer who overcame obstacles like weak eyesight and teachers who discouraged women from pursuing astronomy to lead the NASA team that built the Hubble Space Telescope. A testament to women in scientific careers and a record of an important NASA milestone.

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Books About Science and Explorers

Charles Darwin's Around-The-World Adventure book
#1
Charles Darwin's Around-The-World Adventure
Written and illustrated by Jennifer Thermes
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-7

In 1831, Charles Darwin embarked on his first voyage. Though he was a scientist by profession, he was an explorer at heart. While journeying around South America for the first time aboard a ninety-foot-long ship named the Beagle, Charles collected insets, dug up bones, galloped with gauchos, encountered volcanoes and earthquakes, and even ate armadillo for breakfast! The discoveries he made during this adventure would later inspire ideas that changed how we see the world.

Star Stuff: Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos book
#2
Star Stuff: Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos
Written and illustrated by Stephanie Roth Sisson
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

For every child who has ever looked up at the stars and asked, "What are they?" comes the story of a curious boy who never stopped wondering: Carl Sagan. When Carl Sagan was a young boy he went to the 1939 World's Fair and his life was changed forever. From that day on he never stopped marveling at the universe and seeking to understand it better. Star Stuff follows Carl from his days star gazing from the bedroom window of his Brooklyn apartment, through his love of speculative science fiction novels, to his work as an internationally renowned scientist who worked on the Voyager missions exploring the farthest reaches of space. This book introduces the beloved man who brought the mystery of the cosmos into homes across America to a new generation of dreamers and star gazers.

All Aboard The Discovery Express book
#3
All Aboard The Discovery Express
Written by Tom Adams and Emily Hawkins and illustrated by Tom Clohosy Cole
picture book
Recommend Ages: 7-10

Welcome on board the Discovery Express! The year is 1937 and a conundrum is afoot: a professor on the verge of a brilliant discovery has disappeared. Can you help to solve the clues on this time-travelling adventure and track down the missing scientist? On your voyage, you'll travel the world, see some of the most important moments in the history of transportation, meet the most brilliant engineers of all time, and ultimately unveil the design of the world’s first jet engine! ?This interactive lift-flap adventure is sure to spark the imaginations of aspiring scientists and engineers everywhere.

Honorable Mentions
  1. Karl, Get Out of the Garden! - Do you know what a Solanum caule inermi herbaceo, foliis pinnatis incises, racemis simplicibus is?* Carolus (Karl) Linnaeus started off as a curious child who loved exploring the garden. Despite his intelligence—and his mother’s scoldings—he was a poor student, preferring to be outdoors with his beloved plants and bugs. As he grew up, Karl’s love of nature led him to take on a seemingly impossible task: to give a scientific name to every living thing on earth. The result was the Linnaean system—the basis for the classification system used by biologists around the world today. Backyard sciences are brought to life in beautiful color. Back matter includes more information about Linnaeus and scientific classification, a classification chart, a time line, source notes, resources for young readers, and a bibliography. *it’s a tomato!

  2. Baby Loves Gravity - Big, brainy science for the littlest listeners. Accurate enough to satisfy an expert, yet simple enough for baby, this clever board book explores the ups and downs of gravity. When baby drops food from a high chair, why does it fall? Beautiful, visually stimulating illustrations complement age-appropriate language to encourage baby's sense of wonder. Parents and caregivers may learn a thing or two, as well!

  3. Many Moons - Many Moons explores every phase of the moon through beautiful illustrations, and compares each phase to a different shape, like a waxing moon and a banana! Many Moons shows young children the different phases of the moon, from the new moon to a waning crescent, with a variety of beautiful, bright illustrations. Each spread features a specific phase of the moon, and compares it to different shapes, such as a cat's tail, a banana, or a brilliant smile. The night sky is vast and beautiful, and to many children, a mysterious thing full of wonder. Why not nurture this sense of early curiosity? Many Moons introduces children to basic astronomy. Understanding the moon is a jumping off point to learning about the stars, space, the ocean tides, and so much more

  4. Feathers and Hair, What Animals Wear - At first glance, a wild animal’s appearance may seem simple. But there is fascinating science behind every part of an animal’s physique—from its nose to its toes! Celebrated author Jennifer Ward explores different kinds of fur, feathers, skin, and scales in this nonfiction picture book that’s truly like no other. From porcupines and polar bears to octopuses and owls, you’ll never see animal outerwear the same way again!

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Books About Science and Scientists

Ada Twist, Scientist book
#1
Ada Twist, Scientist
Written by Andrea Beaty and illustrated by David Roberts
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm

Ada is such a fun, curious character! I really love that the story shows her growing up and developing her passion for learning--along with a supportive family. If you have toddlers who ask a lot of questions, this book might feel a little familiar. :) This book is a great intro to science and includes some simple scientific vocabulary (like hypothesis) and talks about how science involves asking questions. I also really appreciate the diversity and strong female role model this book provides.

Ada Twist’s head is full of questions. Like her classmates Iggy and Rosie—stars of their own New York Times bestselling picture books Iggy Peck, Architect and Rosie Revere, Engineer—Ada has always been endlessly curious. Even when her fact-finding missions and elaborate scientific experiments don’t go as planned, Ada learns the value of thinking her way through problems and continuing to stay curious.

Stephen Hawking (Little People, BIG DREAMS) book
#2
Stephen Hawking (Little People, BIG DREAMS)
Written by Maria Isabel Sanchez Vegara and illustrated by Matt Hunt
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

When Stephen Hawking was a little boy, he used to stare up at the stars and wonder about the universe. Although he was never top of the class, his curiosity took him to the best universities in England: Oxford and Cambridge. It also led him to make one of the biggest scientific discoveries of the 20th century: Hawking radiation. This moving book features stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, including a biographical timeline with historical photos and a detailed profile of the brilliant physicist's life.

Scientist, Scientist, Who Do You See? book
#3
Scientist, Scientist, Who Do You See?
Written and illustrated by Chris Ferrie
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Full of scientific rhyming fun, Scientist, Scientist, Who Do You See? features appearances by some of the world's greatest scientists! From Albert Einstein to Marie Curie and Ahmed Zewail, and from Charles Darwin to Chien-Shiung Wu and Grace Hopper...and more! Scientist, Scientist, Who do you see? I see Marie Curie in her laboratory! Young readers will delight at taking a familiar text and poking fun at it all while learning about scientists and how they changed the world. Back matter includes brief biographical information of the featured scientists. This sweet parody is the perfect inspiration for scientists of all ages!

Honorable Mentions
  1. Baby Oceanographer - Baby Scientist is an adorable board book series that brings fun, accessible science concepts to baby’s world using simple language, recognizable settings, and vibrant art. Read them all with your baby scientist! Baby Oceanographer explores the oceans. With his snorkel and mask, he looks at the animals and plants under the sea. What creatures are found deep down? Are waves in the ocean like waves in the bathtub? Find out with Baby Oceanographer! Don’t miss the other books in this series, including Baby Astronaut!

  2. The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind - Japanese edition of The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind. True story of a boy growing up in an improvised, desolate central Africa. The 14 year old William Kamkwamba learned about electrical windmills at a small library, and after weeks of foraging for junk parts, he did the incredible. In Japanese. Distributed by Tsai Fong Books, Inc.

  3. Summer Birds - Documents the work of a young girl, Maria Merian, who lived during the Middle Ages and disproved the theory of spontaneous generation by observing caterpillars as they spun cocoons and emerged as butterflies and moths in the spring. By the author of the Newbery Honor Book, The Surrender Tree.

  4. Look Up! - Henrietta Levitt was the first person to discover the scientific importance of a star’s brightness—so why has no one heard of her? Learn all about a female pioneer of astronomy in this picture book biography. Henrietta Swan Leavitt was born on July 4, 1868, and she changed the course of astronomy when she was just twenty-five years old. Henrietta spent years measuring star positions and sizes from photographs taken by the telescope at the Harvard College Observatory, where she worked. After Henrietta observed that certain stars had a fixed pattern to their changes, her discovery made it possible for astronomers to measure greater and greater distances—leading to our present understanding of the vast size of the universe. An astronomer of her time called Henrietta Leavitt “one of the most important women ever to touch astronomy,” and another close associate said she had the “best mind at the Harvard Observatory.” Henrietta Leaveitt's story will inspire young women and aspiring scientists of all kinds and includes additional information about the solar system and astronomy.

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Books About Science and Non-fiction

Hello, World! Dinosaurs book
#1
Hello, World! Dinosaurs
Written and illustrated by Jill McDonald
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3

All young children love dinosaurs. Now here's a board book that teaches toddlers all about Triceratops, Stegosaurus, T-rex, and many more--with colors, shapes, sizes, and super-simple facts. Hello, World! is a series designed to introduce first nonfiction concepts to babies and toddlers. Told in clear and easy terms ("T. rex's arms were very small, even though its body was large") and featuring bright, cheerful illustrations, Hello, World! makes learning fun for young children. And each sturdy page offers helpful prompts for engaging with your child. It's a perfect way to bring science and nature into the busy world of a toddler, where learning never stops. Look for all the books in the Hello, World! series: Solar System, Weather, Backyard Bugs, Birds, and My Body.

I, Fly book
#2
I, Fly
Written by Bridget Heos and illustrated by Jennifer Plecas
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Fly is fed up with everyone studying butterflies. Flies are so much cooler! They flap their wings 200 times a second, compared to a butterfly's measly five to twelve times. Their babies—maggots—are much cuter than caterpillars (obviously). And when they eat solid food, they even throw up on it to turn it into a liquid. Who wouldn't want to study an insect like that? In an unforgettably fun, fact-filled presentation, this lovable (and highly partisan) narrator promotes his species to a sometimes engrossed, sometimes grossed-out, class of kids.

How to Survive as a Shark book
#3
How to Survive as a Shark
Written by Kristen Foote and illustrated by Erica Salcedo
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-10

Ahoy, me mateys! Upset your Mom swam away after you were born? Cry me an ocean. You’ve got ME to show you the ropes! Well, at least until I get a craving for baby shark. Swim along and I’ll teach you how to hunt using all six senses (a whole sense more than a human), why you can NEVER stop moving (blimey, no - not even to sleep!), and what your most dangerous threat is (here’s a hint: those sneaky landlubbers don’t even live in our waters!). Aye, me hearties, learning How to Survive as a Shark is not as easy as it sounds! How to Survive as a Shark provides a unique take on fish science that will entertain and educate in and out of the classroom. Full of opportunities for extended learning, this book includes fun facts hidden throughout the hilarious illustrated story – and after, a glossary of important terms and some real photos of great white sharks. If you’ve ever wondered how to think and swim like a shark, and you like to laugh while you learn, this book is for you!

Honorable Mentions
  1. Something Rotten - When Heather L. Montgomery sees a rattlesnake flattened on the side of the road, her first instinct is to pick it up and dissect it--she's always wanted to see how a snake's fangs retract when they close their mouths, and it's not exactly safe to poke around in a live reptile's mouth. A wildlife researcher with a special penchant for the animals that litter the roadways, Heather isn't satisfied with dissecting just one snake. Her fascination with roadkill sets her off on a journey from her own backyard and the roadways of the American South to scientists and kids in labs and homes across the globe. From biologists who use the corpses of Tasmanian devils to investigate cures for a contagious cancer, to a scientist who discovered a whole new species of bird from a single wing left behind, to a boy rebuilding animal bodies from the bones up, to a restaurant that serves up animal remnants, Heather discovers that death is just the beginning for these creatures. This engaging narrative nonfiction is an eye-opening and irreverent look at the dead and dying animals that we pass by without a second thought--as well as a fascinating insight to the scientific research process.

  2. What in the World? - Discover nature by the numbers in this gorgeous, innovative counting book. The natural world is full of sets of numbers: from birds’ wings in twos and clover leaves in threes to deer hooves in fours and octopus arms in eights. This book uses playful rhyming text to explore these numerical sets in vibrant detail, ending with the stars in the sky—a number set too big to count!

  3. A Bird Is a Bird - Some birds are huge and some are tiny. Some birds are fantastically colorful and some are plain. What do all birds share? Early nonfiction expert Lizzy Rockwell explains that birds have beaks, wings, and feathers, and hatch from eggs. Other animals might have some of these features in common, but only a bird has them all. Only a bird is a bird! A clear text and graceful illustrations cover dozens of different birds and their shared characteristics, as well as the unique qualities of unusual birds, such as penguins and peacocks.

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Books About Science and Fact Filled

Mama Dug a Little Den book
#1
Mama Dug a Little Den
Written by Jennifer Ward and illustrated by Steven Jenkins
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-8

There are so many different kinds of dens that mother animals make for their babies, from desert burrows to snow caves to elaborate underground tunnels. Jennifer Ward introduces young readers to all sorts of animals and the cozy burrows they call home in this bouncy, rhyming picture book, illustrated by Caldecott Honoree Steve Jenkins.

Future Astronaut book
#2
Future Astronaut
Written by Lori Alexander and illustrated by Allison Black
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3

Ground Control to Major Baby: Could you be an astronaut? Does baby have what it takes to become an astronaut? That's an affirmative, Houston! Discover all the incredible ways that prove baby already has what it takes to become an astronaut -- from growing healthy teeth to eating from plastic packs to working in small spaces. Includes lots of fun astronaut facts to help prepare little ones for takeoff! Future Baby is an adorable new board book series that takes a playful peek into an assortment of powerful careers and shows little ones how their current skills match up with the job at hand. With Future Baby, babies can be anything!

Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Math book
#3
Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Math
Written by Bob Cooper and illustrated by Greg Paprocki and Bob Cooper
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

"Introduces kids to many of the basic concepts of mathematics, including their connection with so many things in our everyday lives."--Back cover.

Honorable Mentions
  1. Mama Built a Little Nest - Illustrations and simple, rhyming text introduce different kinds of birds' nests, from the scrapes that falcons build atop high, craggy ledges to the underground nests that burrowing owls dig. Includes brief facts about each kind of bird.

  2. Your Amazing Skin from Outside In - It’s itchy, it’s sweaty, it’s embarrassing...but most of all, it’s fascinating! Dr. Joanne Settel has all the answers to our most burning questions in this wacky and informative book of poems about our skin. Have you ever wondered… Why you blush when you’re embarrassed? Why you’ve got freckles everywhere? Why your fingers wrinkle in the pool? Why your friends come in all different colors? Why mosquitoes think you’re delicious? Why you’ve got that giant pimple on your nose? Look no further! With supercool facts, clever rhymes, and hilarious illustrations by Bonnie Timmons, acclaimed author Joanne Settel answers all these questions (and more!) in this fascinating, fun exploration of the science of our skin from head to toe. When she’s through, you won’t believe what your skin can do!

  3. Bugs Don't Hug - Meet the mamas and papas of the insect world in this fresh and funny nonfiction look at how bugs are like us from popular science author and teacher Heather Montgomery. Most insects don't take care of their young, but some do--in surprising ways. Some bugs clean up after their messy little ones, cater to their picky eaters, and yes--hug their baby bugs. A fun and clever look at parenting in the insect world, perfect for backyard scientists and their own moms and dads.

  4. Starry Skies - Every night, the sky is filled with stars that tell a thousand tales. Brave warriors, regal queens, fierce beasts -- they all parade across the starry skies each night. In Starry Skies you’ll discover some of the most famous constellations and learn how to find them in the night sky. With brilliant illustrations by Nila Aye, you will see the shapes of each constellation, and imagine what they might look like when you look up into the dark sky above. This introduction to astronomy is all you need to start learning about stars, so get ready, star hunters, and look to the skies!

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Books About Science and Animals

Over and Under the Pond book
#1
Over and Under the Pond
Written by Kate Messner and illustrated by Christopher Silas Neal
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8
Thoughts from Readerly Mom

This book walks the line between fiction and non-fiction in a way that is perfect for reading and learning with little ones. The illustrations are darling and make the book feel like it has a narrative; the over and under concept likewise makes it very approachable. At the same time, it provides a lot of concrete information about the animals that live in and around a pond. It's informative, but brief enough and cute enough to be very readable, even for toddlers. We used it for a preschool lesson and it was a hit!

In this gorgeous companion to the acclaimed Over and Under the Snow and Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt, Kate Messner and Christopher Silas Neal bring to life a secret underwater world. In this book, readers will discover the plants and animals that make up the rich, interconnected ecosystem of a mountain pond. Over the pond, the water is a mirror, reflecting the sky. But under the pond is a hidden world of minnows darting, beavers diving, tadpoles growing. These and many other secrets are waiting to be discovered...over and under the pond.

Water Sings Blue book
#2
Water Sings Blue
Written by Kate Coombs and illustrated by Meilo So
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

Come down to the shore with this rich and vivid celebration of the ocean! With watercolors gorgeous enough to wade in by award-winning artist Meilo So and playful, moving poems by Kate Coombs, Water Sings Blue evokes the beauty and power, the depth and mystery, and the endless resonance of the sea.

Badir and the Beaver book
#3
Badir and the Beaver
Written by Shannon Stewart and illustrated by Sabrina Gendron
picture book
Recommend Ages: 6-8

I t’s Ramadan, a time to focus on good deeds and to fast, and Badir and his brother, Anis, are out for a walk one evening while they wait for their iftar meal. In the park Badir sees a rat. A very, very large rat. He soon learns it’s actually a beaver, an animal that doesn’t live in Tunisia, the country Badir and his family have emigrated from. It turns out that some of the neighbors who enjoy the park think this beaver is a bit of a pest, but Badir thinks it’s wonderful and learns everything he can about the iconic Canadian animal. When a petition is started to remove the beaver, Badir, who knows firsthand how difficult it is to leave your home behind, rallies his classmates to save it. And with a little help from new friends, the kids learn that collaboration and faith can change the way we think about the world.

Honorable Mentions
  1. Butterflies in Room 6 - Kindergarteners raise butterflies from egg to adult in this close-up look at the insect life cycle. Follow a classroom of real kindergartners as they participate in a popular activity: raising butterflies. Astonishing photographs show the life cycle of the painted lady butterfly, from egg to caterpillar to chrysalis to adult. Engaging text captures the children's wonder and explains the science behind metamorphosis.

  2. Seashells - Prolific, award-winning nonfiction author Melissa Stewart reveals the surprising ways seashells provide more than shelter to the mollusks that inhabit them. Young naturalists discover thirteen seashells in this elegant introduction to the remarkable versatility of shells. A dual-layered narrative highlights how shells provide more than a protective home. The informative sidebars underscore characteristics specific to each shell. Elegant watercolor illustrations create a scrapbook feel, depicting children from around the world observing and sketching seashells across shores.

  3. Science Comics: Dogs - How well do you know our favorite furry companion? Did they really descend from wolves? What's the difference between a Chihuahua and a Saint Bernard? And just how smart are they? Join one friendly mutt on a journey to discover the secret origin of dogs, how genetics and evolution shape species, and where in the world his favorite ball bounced off to. Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic—dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty year old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you!

  4. Mission Science Club - The after-school science club is just starting, and Beatrice Honey Flinn, who is called Bumble B, and her best friends are joining, but when Mr. Dan separates the students into teams, Bumble B finds herself paired off with two children she does not know, Jasmine and Otto, instead of her friends--and their assignment is to make a list of all the animals, insects, plants, and rocks they find in the playground.

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Books About Science and Math

Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code book
#1
Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code
Written by Laurie Wallmark and illustrated by Katy Wu
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-9

Who was Grace Hopper? A software tester, workplace jester, cherished mentor, ace inventor, avid reader, naval leader—AND rule breaker, chance taker, and troublemaker. Acclaimed picture book author Laurie Wallmark (Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine) once again tells the riveting story of a trailblazing woman. Grace Hopper coined the term “computer bug” and taught computers to “speak English.” Throughout her life, Hopper succeeded in doing what no one had ever done before. Delighting in difficult ideas and in defying expectations, the insatiably curious Hopper truly was “Amazing Grace” . . . and a role model for science- and math-minded girls and boys. With a wealth of witty quotes, and richly detailed illustrations, this book brings Hopper's incredible accomplishments to life.

Baby Loves Coding book
#2
Baby Loves Coding
Written by Ruth Spiro and illustrated by Irene Chan
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-5

Big, brainy science for the littlest listeners Accurate enough to satisfy an expert, yet simple enough for baby, this clever board book showcases the use of logic, sequence, and patterns to solve problems. Can Baby think like a coder to fix her train? Beautiful, visually stimulating illustrations complement age-appropriate language to encourage baby's sense of wonder. Parents and caregivers may learn a thing or two, as well!

Snowman - Cold = Puddle book
#3
Snowman - Cold = Puddle
Written by Laura Purdie Salas and illustrated by Micha Archer
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Math is all around us, and in this clever and enlightening picture book, readers see how math, nature, and poetry intermingle and collaborate . . . well, naturally. Each clever equation is a tiny, perfect poem that prompts readers to look at the ordinary and see the miraculous. Can you look at an egg in a nest and see a jewelry box? How are sunlight and heat like an alarm clock? Engaging sidebars reveal the science behind the signs of spring.

Honorable Mentions
  1. That's a Possibility! - Combines colorful photographs and interactive examples in an introduction to the science and math of probability that provides comprehensive explanations about games of chance and various easy-to-understand scenarios. By the author of Great Estimations.

  2. 100 Bugs! A Counting Book - A boy and girl find and count 100 different bugs in their backyard in increments of ten.

  3. Ellie, Engineer: The Next Level - Ellie the Engineer is back in another charming, hilarious, illustrated story filled with creative, STEM-powered fun! "Look out, Junie B. Jones! Ellie the engineer is thinking, making, creating, and showing enthusiasm and brilliance with her creations!" -School Library Connection on Ellie, Engineer After Ellie's first elevator build goes terribly wrong, her parents decide her "punishment" is to assist an elderly neighbor, Mrs. Curran, around the house. Ellie and her friends Kit and Toby are really only supposed to help with little things, but Ellie can't turn down the opportunity to use her engineering skills here and there where she sees a need--because that's what engineers do! It's no fun, though, when Mrs. Curran always gives Toby the credit for all the ingenious projects, and acts like Kit and Ellie were just helping him. . . . Can Ellie come up with another great build to elevate Mrs. Curran's ideas about this girl engineer? With Ellie's designs and sketches throughout, and her fun guide to simple machines in the back, the continuation of this delightful series will leave young readers laughing and inspired to create.

  4. Statistical Physics for Babies - Simple explanations of complex ideas for your future genius! Written by an expert, Statistical Physics for Babies is a colorfully simple introduction to the second law of thermodynamics. Babies (and grownups!) will learn all about entropy, probability, and more. With a tongue-in-cheek approach that adults will love, this installment of the Baby University board book series is the perfect way to introduce basic concepts to even the youngest scientists. After all, it's never too early to become a scientist! Baby University: It only takes a small spark to ignite a child's mind.

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Books About Science and Outer Space

Rocket Science for Babies book
#1
Rocket Science for Babies
Written and illustrated by Chris Ferrie
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-3
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm

This book does a really great job of simplifying the explanations for lift, thrust, and rocket science. I think adults will learn from this one, too! :) It has very simple illustrations to go along with the simple explanations, and I like that this book is very educational. It might still go over little one's heads, but I still think it's a great intro book, teaching them science behind really cool rockets.

Ages 0 to 3 years Rocket Science for Babies by Chris Ferrie is an introduction to aerospace engineering (also known as rocket science). Baby will learn the principles of lift and thrust, the forces responsible for flight. This is the first in a series of books designed to stimulate your baby and introduce them to the world of science. Also coming in May are: Newtonian Physics for Babies General Relativity for Babies Quantum Physics for Babies

Midnight on the Moon book
#2
Midnight on the Moon
Written by Mary Pope Osborne and illustrated by Sal Murdocca
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

The magic treehouse takes Jack and Annie to a moon base in the future where they continue to search for the fourth thing they need to free their friend Morgan from the magician's spell.

Our World Is Relative book
#3
Our World Is Relative
Written by Julia Sooy and illustrated by Molly Walsh
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Size, speed, weight, direction, distance We think of space and time as fixed and measurable. But these measurements—our experience of space and time—they are relative. Our world is relative. With simple, engaging text and vibrant art imbued with light and movement, Our World Is Relative offers a child's-eye view of time, space, and the vast role that relativity plays in comprehending our world. It's an introduction to Albert Einstein's theory of relativity, perfect for any curious young scientist.

Honorable Mentions
  1. If Pluto Was a Pea - Join two curious kids as they explore their backyard, and contemplate their place within our vast universe in this adorable picture book that’s full of comparisons to help kids understand cosmic size. If Pluto was a pea… the Sun would be like a tent, Mercury would be a marble, and Earth would be a golf ball. Pluto is the smallest planet in our solar system, but how small is small? As it turns out, it only takes the contents of a lunchbox and a backyard to find out.

  2. Destination: Space - Hop on board the space shuttle and get ready for the ride of your life as you explore deep space with your five fellow space cadets. This journey of discovery takes you through our local solar system and beyond, to galaxies far and wide. With every encounter, learn more about the science behind the stars, planets, meteors and comets in our sky, and the history of our universe.

  3. A Journey Through Space - Take a journey from your doorstep into outer space! Zoom through the Solar System, discovering satellites, comets and asteroids along the way. Explore craters on Mars, moon-hop around Jupiter, and get a close-up view of Saturn's amazing rings. Just don't travel too close to the Sun! Packed with lively illustrations to reveal our amazing universe, this book is perfect for a parent and child to read together or to explore independently. Includes a dust jacket that doubles up as a poster.

  4. Pluto is Peeved! - Who can blame Pluto for being peeved after scientists unceremoniously decide he is no longer a planet? Looking for answers, Pluto heads to the science museum! Kids will take a scientific journey side-by- side with Pluto, as he asks what exactly scientists are interested in. Presented in a graphic novel-inspired format Pluto Is Peeved! transforms the vast universe into a fun and informative introduction to astronomy and the scientific method.

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Books About Science and Technology

Adi Sorts with Variables book
#1
Adi Sorts with Variables
Written by Caroline Karanja and illustrated by Ben William Whitehouse
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

It's time to clean Adi's room! If only a computer could do it for her! That gives Adi and her best friend Gabi an idea-think like a coder! These scientific thinkers put on their computer coding caps and make cleaning up a snap by sorting with variables!

Sleepover Scientist #3 book
#2
Sleepover Scientist #3
Written by Kelly Starling Lyons and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton and Nneka Myers
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-8

Jada Jones is back for the third book of this popular, celebrated series perfect for STEM fans! Jada is hosting her first sleepover, and she has lots of cool scientific activities planned: kitchen chemistry, creating invisible ink, and even making slime! But when her friends get tired of the lessons and just want to hang out, can Jada figure out the formula for fun and save the sleepover?

What's the Matter with the Three Little Pigs? book
#3
What's the Matter with the Three Little Pigs?
Written by Thomas Kingsley Troupe and illustrated by Jomike Tejido
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

What's the matter with the three little pigs? They're being tormented by a hungry wolf! And no matter what kind of matter they use to build their homes, it doesn't matter. The STEM-savvy, rhyme-loving wolf in this fractured fairy tale always seems to spoil the day. A glossary and critical thinking questions support the story's physics content.

Honorable Mentions
  1. Enginerds - The battle between boys and bots is on in this funny, fast-paced novel. Ken is an EngiNerd: one of a super-smart group of friends—all nerds—who have been close since kindergarten. They may be brainiacs, but they’re just like everyone else: they fight with one another, watch too much TV, eat Chinese food, and hate walking their dogs. Well, maybe not just like everyone because Ken’s best friend Dan has been building robots. He then secretly sent one to each of the EngiNerds, never letting them know he’s the mastermind. At first Ken is awed and delighted: what kid hasn’t dreamed of having a robot all their own? Someone who can be their friend, clean their room, walk the dog, answer homework questions…how amazing is that? But be careful what you wish for: Dan’s robot, Greeeg, may look innocent, but his ravenous consumption of food—comestibles—turns him into a butt-blasting bot. And once the other robots ‘come alive’ it’s up to the motley crew of EngiNerds to not only save the day, but save the planet!

  2. Gabi's If/Then Garden - Gabi's garden needs some help. Where to begin? Gabi and her best friend Adi use if/then statements to decide what to plant, what to water, and what to pick! These scientific thinkers find ways every day to use computer coding concepts to make work and play more fun!

  3. Gabi's Fabulous Functions - Computer coding in the kitchen? Yes! Best friends Gabi and Adi are baking a special birthday treat-and making a recipe is a lot like creating a function in a computer code. These scientifically minded junior programmers are always on the lookout for ways to work coding concepts into their day with Code Play!

  4. Move on Up That Beanstalk, Jack! - When times are tough, you pull yourself up and push yourself to the top ... of a beanstalk ... where you might get schooled in forces and motion by a STEM-loving giant named Dennis. At least that's what happens to Jack in this delicious twist on a classic fairy tale, supported by critical thinking questions and a glossary of key physics terms.

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Books About Science and Friendship

The Major Eights 3: The Goo Disaster! book
#1
The Major Eights 3: The Goo Disaster!
Written by Melody Reed and illustrated by Emilie Pepin
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-8

In book three of the Major Eights series, Maggie has to ace her science fair project or she won't be able to perform with the band at the annual arts banquet! Maggie is thrilled to perform with the Major Eights at the school's annual arts fund-raising banquet. But when Maggie's science grade starts slipping (her one difficult subject), her mom refuses to let her play at the banquet unless she can get an A on her science fair project. Can Maggie and the girls find a way to make sure Maggie aces the project?

Sleepover Scientist book
#2
Sleepover Scientist
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-8

Jada Jones is back for the third book of this popular, celebrated series perfect for STEM fans! Jada is hosting her first sleepover, and she has lots of cool scientific activities planned: kitchen chemistry, creating invisible ink, and even making slime! But when her friends get tired of the lessons and just want to hang out, can Jada figure out the formula for fun and save the sleepover? Praise for Jada Jones: Rock Star "Fast-paced, with supersimple vocabulary and a smattering of earth science to spark interest in young rock collectors everywhere."--Kirkus Reviews "Readers who love "Ivy and Bean" or "Katie Woo" will want to meet Jada Jones."--School Library Journal

George and the Big Bang book
#3
George and the Big Bang
Written by Lucy Hawking and Stephen Hawking and illustrated by Garry Parsons
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Explore how the universe began—and thwart evil along the way—in this cosmic adventure from Stephen and Lucy Hawking that includes a graphic novel. George has problems. He has twin baby sisters at home who demand his parents’ attention. His beloved pig Freddy has been exiled to a farm, where he’s miserable. And worst of all, his best friend, Annie, has made a new friend whom she seems to like more than George. So George jumps at the chance to help Eric with his plans to run a big experiment in Switzerland that seeks to explore the earliest moment of the universe. But there is a conspiracy afoot, and a group of evildoers is planning to sabotage the experiment. Can George repair his friendship with Annie and piece together the clues before Eric’s experiment is destroyed forever? This engaging adventure features essays by Professor Stephen Hawking and other eminent physicists about the origins of the universe and ends with a twenty-page graphic novel that explains how the Big Bang happened—in reverse!

Honorable Mentions
  1. Ada Lace and the Impossible Mission - From Emily Calandrelli—Emmy-nominated host of Xploration Outer Space, correspondent on Bill Nye Saves the World, and graduate of MIT—comes the fourth novel in a fun illustrated chapter book series about an eight-year-old girl with a knack for science, math, and solving mysteries with technology. Third grader and inventor extraordinaire Ada Lace has a new social studies teacher—who loves group projects. While most of the class has constructed regular dioramas with clay and construction paper, Ada, her best friend Nina, and sometimes nemesis Milton have built a complex scale model of an historic silver mine. But when Milton reveals that he added his “old Milton touch” on their project right before turning it in, Ada worries that he has sabotaged their work. In a desperate attempt to save their project, Ada and Nina use their combined creative and technical prowess to perform a heist and break into their teacher’s supply closet after school. Do the two friends have what it takes to deceive the school’s security system? Or will they get caught trying to pull off this seemingly impossible mission.

  2. Made for Each Other: Why Dogs and People Are Perfect Partners - Celebrates the bond between humans and their canine companions, discussing scientific insights that demonstrate how sharing one's life with a dog reduces stress, provides companionship, and increases safety.

  3. Rock Star - When Jada Jones’s best friend moves away, school feels like the last place she wants to be. She’d much rather wander outside looking for cool rocks to add to her collection, since finding rocks is much easier than finding friends. So when Jada’s teacher announces a class project on rocks and minerals, Jada finally feels like she’s in her element. The only problem: one of her teammates doesn’t seem to like any of Jada’s ideas. She doesn’t seem to like Jada all that much, either. Can Jada figure out a way to make a winning science project and a new friend?

  4. The Giant from the Fire Sea - Jat is a boy who wants more from life than collecting coal from the Fire Sea. Newton is a misfit giant, cast out of his homeland for his love of science and reading. Brought together by chance, the two become the best of friends. But when enemy giants threaten to ruin everything, it's up to Jat and Newton to defend Jat’s village, leading to the journey of a lifetime.

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Books About Science and Sleuthing

To Catch a Thief book
#1
To Catch a Thief
Written by Mandy Hartley
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-11

In the first book of the DNA Detectives series Annabelle and Harry's pet dog, Milly goes missing. After putting up posters and waiting on their parents they don't know what to do. But when a number of their friend's pets also vanish the children think the perpetrator is their next door neighbour and set out to prove it.

A Hint of Hydra book
#2
A Hint of Hydra
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Thirteen-year-old chef Lailu Loganberry must stop a war between the elves and scientists in this follow-up to A Dash of Dragon, which Kirkus Reviews calls “a recipe for success.” It’s the Week of Masks, a festival held to chase away evil spirits. But Lailu doesn’t have time to worry about demons. She has bigger fish to fry—or rather, griffons, now that she’s been asked to prepare a mystical feast for the king’s executioner, Lord Elister. Unfortunately Lailu’s meal is overshadowed by the scientists’ latest invention: automatons, human-shaped machines that will respond to their masters’ every order. Most people are excited by the possibilities, but the mechanical men leave Lailu with a bad taste in her mouth. Even worse, the elves still blame the scientists for the attacks on them weeks ago, and Lailu worries that the elves might be cooking up revenge. So when she and her sorta-rival-turned-almost-friend Greg stumble across the body of a scientist, the elves are the prime suspects. With help from Greg, her best friend Hannah, and the sneaky, winking spy Ryon, Lailu has to discover the truth behind the murder, and soon—because hostilities between the elves and the scientists are about to boil over faster than hydra stew. And just ask any chef: war is bad for business.

The Case of the Barfy Birthday book
#3
The Case of the Barfy Birthday
Written by Michele Torrey and illustrated by Barbara Johansen Newman
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-11

Fifth graders Drake Doyle and Nell Fossey use their detective and scientific investigation skills to solve cases which involve food poisoning, missing terns, a haunted treehouse, and a pig in a pit.

Honorable Mentions
  1. The Exact Location of Home - Kate Messner pens a new moving tale of family and friendship about a tech-savvy boy searching for his father during tough times. Kirby "Zig" Zigonski lives for the world of simple circuits, light bulbs, buzzers, and motors. Electronics are, after all, much more predictable than most people--especially his father, who he hasn't seen in over a year. When his dad's latest visit is canceled with no explanation and his mom seems to be hiding something, Zig turns to his best friend Gianna and a new gizmo--a garage sale GPS unit--for help. Convinced that his dad is leaving clues around town to explain his absence, Zig sets out to find him. Following one clue after another, logging mile after mile, Zig soon discovers that people aren't always what they seem . . . and sometimes, there's more than one set of coordinates for home. An important story of love and hope that will capture readers' hearts, The Exact Location of Home is another must read from beloved author Kate Messner.

  2. The Case of the Crooked Carnival - Fourth-graders Drake Doyle and Nell Fossey combine their detective and scientific investigation skills to solve cases involving a crooked carnival barker, a mysterious ghost, an alien plant species invading wildlife habitats and a wobbly bridge. Original.

  3. The Case of the Mossy Lake Monster - Fourth-graders Drake Doyle and Nell Fossey combine their detective and scientific investigation skills to solve a variety of cases involving a hungry cat, endangered penguins, a fish-stealing monster, and a dirty election. Includes a section of scientific experiments and activities.

  4. The Case of the Graveyard Ghost - Drake Doyle and Nell Fossey, who are now in fifth grade, continue to combine their detective and scientific investigation skills to solve a variety of cases, involving a noisy laundry chute, a ruined flower show, and a ghost.

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Books About Science and Anatomy

Explore a Dog book
#1
Explore a Dog
Written and illustrated by Paul Beck
board book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

Dig into the tail-wagging world of man’s best friend! Uncover the secrets of man’s best friend layer by layer in this new title in the popular Explore series. Young dog fans will love discovering all the weird and wild facts, viewing the cool illustrations and diagrams, and examining the unique 3-D layered model of a dog. With every turn of the page, the pup is deconstructed before their eyes, as the model demonstrates the hidden workings of the dog’s body. Perfect for curious kids, ages 8 and up.

The Busy Body Book: A Kid's Guide to Fitness book
#2
The Busy Body Book: A Kid's Guide to Fitness
Written and illustrated by Lizzy Rockwell
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

A celebration of the amazing human machine and a life on the move! Your amazing body can jump, sprint, twist, and twirl. Your body is built to move. Lizzy Rockwell explains how your bones and muscles, heart and lungs, nerves and brain all work together to keep you on the go. Kids walk and skate and tumble through these pages with such exuberance that even sprouting couch potatoes will want to get up and bounce around—and that’s the ultimate goal. Studies show that American kids are becoming more sedentary and more overweight and that they carry these tendencies with them into adolescence and adulthood. Experts agree that we need to help kids make physical activity a life-long habit. Through education, information, and encouragement, this book aims to inspire a new generation of busy bodies!

Explore a T. Rex book
#3
Explore a T. Rex
Written by Dennis Schatz and illustrated by Christian Kitzmuller and Davide Bonadonna
board book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

A fascinating three-dimensional presentation provides the reader with an in-depth, hands-on exploration of an awe-inspiring T. rex. In Explore a T. Rex, a fascinating three-dimensional presentation allows in-depth, hands-on exploration of the most fearsome dinosaur that ever prowled the earth. This unique “model” can be deconstructed and rebuilt layer by layer, system by system, just by turning the page, so the reader can see how each part of the T. rex’s body is connected to the others. By combining a 3-D model with informative text and pictures, Explore a T. Rex helps children understand how dinosaurs of all shapes and sizes ruled the prehistoric world for millions of years.

Honorable Mentions
  1. Explore the Human Body - A fascinating three-dimensional presentation provides the reader with an in-depth, hands-on exploration of the human body. In Explore the Human Body, a fascinating three-dimensional presentation allows in-depth, hands-on exploration of the most amazing machine in the world—you. This unique “model” can be deconstructed and rebuilt layer by layer, system by system, just by turning the page, so the reader can see how each part of the body is connected to the others. The complexities of the human body can be daunting, particularly for children, so by combining a 3-D model with informative text and pictures, Explore the Human Body helps children understand how all the major systems of the body work together to enable us to breathe, move, and interact with the world around us.

  2. Itch! - Everybody gets itchy, and every kid will love this title that scratches the itch to know more and about the history, anatomy, botany, biology behind it. Perfect for fans of Grossology books looking for something more substantive and dynamic. You can feel it coming on--that terrible, tortuous ITCH. As irritating as an itch is, it is also your body's way of sending you a message you can't miss, like you've brushed up against poison ivy or lice have taken up residence in your hair. None of which you'd know without that telltale itch! And there are so many things that make us itch--from fungus to fleas, mosquitoes to nettles, poison ivy to tarantulas! Combining history, anatomy, laugh-out-loud illustrations, and even tips to avoid--and soothe--the itch, Anita Sanchez and Gilbert Ford take readers on an intriguing (and sometimes disgusting) look into what makes you scratch.

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Books About Science and Art

Melia and Jo book
#1
Melia and Jo
Written and illustrated by Jennifer Oxley and Billy Aronson
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
Thoughts from The Book Snob Mom

Art and science, dancing and inventions combine in this cute story about friendship that quickly develops in place of some initial frustration following the well-known adage that two heads are better than one. The illustrations are cute, spunky and a little child-like and perfectly complement the creative nature of the story.

Melia is scientific and loves to create things in her backyard laboratory, but something is missing. Her inventions just aren’t quite right. Enter Jo, her new friend with an artistic spirit. When you add the arts to sciences, something magical happens! This whimsically illustrated picture book is the perfect introduction to the benefits of STEAM-focused curriculum.

Ada Lace Sees Red book
#2
Ada Lace Sees Red
Written by Tamson Weston and Emily Calandrelli and illustrated by Renee Kurilla
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-10

Ada Lace is building a new robot! She’s determined to beat Milton in the upcoming robotics competition. But she’s distracted—Ada finds her dad’s art class impossible, while Nina is the star of the class, basking in the glory of being Mr. Lace’s star pupil. When Mr. Lace suggests that Nina put on an art show, Ada becomes jealous and loses her temper. Now Ada isn’t speaking to her dad, she’s falling behind in art class, and she still doesn’t know how to fix her robot. As the competition looms closer, Ada starts to wonder if there might be a way to use both science and art to solve her problems. Will Ada make up with her father in time to test her hypothesis? Or will her hurt feelings leave her seeing red and without a medal at the end of the day?

His Royal Whiskers book
#3
His Royal Whiskers
Written by Sam Gayton and illustrated by Sydney Hanson
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

After young would-be alchemists, Pieter and Teresa, accidentally turn Prince Alexander into a giant kitten, the three team up to take down the evil czar who is Alexander's father.

Honorable Mentions
  1. Ada Lace And The Suspicious Artist - From Emily Calandrelli—Emmy-nominated host of Xploration Outer Space, correspondent on Bill Nye Saves the World, and graduate of MIT—comes the fifth novel in a fun illustrated chapter book series about an eight-year-old girl with a knack for science, math, and solving mysteries with technology. Third grader and inventor extraordinaire Ada Lace is on spring break. But it’s just a little less relaxing than she’d imagined. Nina is beside herself with excitement about meeting her favorite artist and enlists Ada and Mr. Peebles’s coding-whiz nephew to help revamp her online portfolio. When Nina finally meets Miroir, he snubs her, and her confidence is shaken—but not enough to miss the art show opening. While there, Ada spots a suspiciously familiar painting that may mean Miroir isn’t the original he claims to be. Will the friends be able to reveal the artist’s true nature, before he fools someone else?

  2. Vivid - Playful poems and facts celebrate the colors of the rainbow in this beautiful picture book. With information about the science of sight and perception, pigment origins in art and textiles, colloquial expressions and word associations, there's so much to see in each vivid spread. Full color.

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Books About Science and Physics

Quantum Physics for Babies (0-3) book
#1
Quantum Physics for Babies (0-3)
Written and illustrated by Chris Ferrie
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-3

Ages 0 to 3 years Quantum Physics for Babies by Chris Ferrie is a colourfully simple introduction to the principle that gives quantum physics its name. Baby will find out that energy is "quantized" and the weird world of atoms never comes to a standstill. It is never too early to become a quantum physicist! This is the first in a series of books designed to stimulate your baby and introduce them to the world of science. Also coming in May are:  Newtonian Physics for Babies  General Relativity for Babies  Rocket Science for Babies

Nuclear Physics for Babies book
#2
Nuclear Physics for Babies
Written by Chris Ferrie and illustrated by Cara Florance and Chris Ferrie
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-3

Simple explanations of complex ideas for your future genius! Written by an expert, Nuclear Physics for Babiesis a colorfully simple introduction to the study of protons, neutrons, quarks and gluons. Babies (and grownups!) how all the particles in that tiny space are held together. Co-written by Cara Florance, who has a PhD in Biochemistry and a BS in Chemistry with work experience in astrobiololgy and radiation decontamination. With atongue-in-cheek approach that adults will love, this installment of the Baby University board book series is the perfect way to introduce basic concepts to even the youngest scientists. After all, it's never too early to become a scientist! Baby University: It only takes a small spark to ignite a child's mind.

Optical Physics for Babies book
#3
Optical Physics for Babies
Written and illustrated by Chris Ferrie
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-3

Finally, a scientific series that treats babies like the geniuses they are! Written by an expert, Optical Physics for Babies is a colorfully simple introduction to optical physics. Babies (and grownups) will discover how light is refracted and reflected and even how rainbows are made!It only takes a small spark to ignite a child's mind.

Honorable Mentions
  1. Baby Loves Quantum Physics! - Big, brainy science for the littlest listeners. Accurate enough to satisfy an expert, yet simple enough for baby, this clever board book engages readers in a game of hide-and-seek with Schrodinger’s famous feline. Can cat be awake and asleep at the same time? Beautiful, visually stimulating illustrations complement age-appropriate language to encourage baby’s sense of wonder. Parents and caregivers may learn a thing or two, as well! With tongue firmly in cheek, the Baby Loves Science series introduces highly intellectual science concepts to the littlest learners.

  2. I Am Albert Einstein - Presents the life of the world-renowned German scientist, describing how his life-long curiosity and ability to question accepted theories led him to develop his famous theory of relatvitiy and win the Noble Prize for Physics.

  3. Newtonian Physics for Babies - Ages 0 to 3 years Newtonian Physics for Babies by Chris Ferrie introduces Newton's three laws of motion. Although centuries old, Newton's laws are still used today to predict the motion of objects at the human scale. With Newton's laws, we can do simple things like predict where a thrown ball will land all the way to complicated things like landing a man on the moon. And now baby will know them too! This is the first in a series of books designed to stimulate your baby and introduce them to the world of science. Also coming in May are:  General Relativity for Babies  Rocket Science for Babies  Quantum Physics for Babies

  4. Quantum Entanglement for Babies - Finally, a scientific series that treats babies like the geniuses they are! Written by an expert, Quantum Entanglement for Babies is a colorfully simple introduction to the phenomenon of quantum entanglement. Babies (and grownups) will learn all about the weird world of quantum particles. It is never too early to become a physicist!It only takes a small spark to ignite a child's mind.

Want to see more children's books about physics?

Books About Science and Adventure

My Weirder-est School #1: Dr. Snow Has Got to Go! book
#1
My Weirder-est School #1: Dr. Snow Has Got to Go!
Written by Dan Gutman and illustrated by Jim Paillot
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-10

In this first book in the My Weirder-est School series, Ella Mentry School is having a science fair! Guest scientist Dr. Snow has arrived to help A.J. and his friends conduct their own cool experiments. But what is “the Snowman” really planning? And what does S.T.E.M. even stand for, anyway? Perfect for reluctant readers and all kids hungry for funny school stories, Dan Gutman’s hugely popular My Weird School chapter book series has something for everyone. Don’t miss the hilarious adventures of A.J. and the gang!

The Alarming Career of Sir Richard Blackstone book
#2
The Alarming Career of Sir Richard Blackstone
Written by Lisa Doan and illustrated by Chris Piascik
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12

Twelve-year-old Henry Hewitt has been living by his wits on the streets of London, dodging his parents, who are determined to sell him as an apprentice. Searching for a way out of the city, Henry lands a position in Hampshire as an assistant to Sir Richard Blackstone, an aristocratic scientist who performs unorthodox experiments in his country manor. The manor house is comfortable, and the cook is delighted to feed Henry as much as he can eat. Sir Richard is also kind, and Henry knows he has finally found a place where he belongs. But everything changes when one of Sir Richard’s experiments accidentally transforms a normal-sized tarantula into a colossal beast that escapes and roams the neighborhood. After a man goes missing and Sir Richard is accused of witchcraft, it is left to young Henry to find an antidote for the oversized arachnid. Things are not as they seem, and in saving Sir Richard from the gallows, Henry also unravels a mystery about his own identity.

Double Trouble book
#3
Double Trouble
Written and illustrated by Jonathan Roth
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-9

Beep and Bob accidentally clone themselves for the school science fair in this fourth book in the hilarious, action-packed Beep and Bob series! What’s twice as fun as Beep and Bob? Two Beeps and Bobs! While up too late working on his science fair project, Bob accidentally points a duplication ray at Beep. To his shock, another Beep appears! Beep decides the more, the better, so he points the ray at Bob and PRESTO: it’s Bob 2 (or Backwards Bob). At first Bob thinks their clones are creepy, but it doesn’t take long to realize that having duplicates comes with perks: they can sleep in while their clones go to class! Then the real Beep and Bob discover a hitch: the Beep and Bob clones are EVIL, and are planning to duplicate an EVIL Earth to rule! How will they possibly get themselves (and themselves!) out of this one?

Honorable Mentions
  1. Gastronauts - Sally Tinker, the world’s foremost inventor under the age of twelve, has an extraordinary new challenge. The brain-enhancing nanobots she is testing have been accidentally swallowed by her baby brother Joe. The only way to stop Joe turning into a superbaby and wreaking super havoc is to shrink herself and travel inside Joe’s body on a journey to tackle the problem head-on. What could possibly go wrong? As it turns out, this is only the beginning ...

  2. Disaster Diaries: Brainwashed! - "A new evil genius has arisen, planning world domination with his homemade brainwashing device! Are Sam, Arty and Emmie brave enough to save the day?"--

  3. Science Comics: Flying Machines - Take to the skies with Flying Machines! Follow the famous aviators from their bicycle shop in Dayton, Ohio, to the fields of North Carolina where they were to make their famous flights. In an era of dirigibles and hot air balloons, the Wright Brothers were among the first innovators of heavier than air flight. But in the hotly competitive international race toward flight, Orville and Wilbur were up against a lot more than bad weather. Mechanical failures, lack of information, and even other aviators complicated the Wright Brothers’ journey. Though they weren’t as wealthy as their European counterparts, their impressive achievements demanded attention on the international stage. Thanks to their carefully recorded experiments and a healthy dash of bravery, the Wright Brothers’ flying machines took off.

  4. Pursued - Axel Jack and Daisha Tandala are two thirteen-year-old friends running from a billionaire madman who killed their scientist parents and now wants what the kids have—a GeoPort (Geographical Transportation System.) The GeoPort, invented by their parents, has the ability to transport a person to any place on Earth within seconds. Knowing the power they had created, their parents’ dying wish was for the kids to destroy the GeoPort before it lands in the wrong hands. But when the teens are separated by their pursuers, they must make a life or death attempt to find each other and get the GeoPort to a mysterious Indian Temple where the chase becomes more than just a high-tech game of hide-and-seek, but a war for control of everything—money, culture, politics, and power.

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Books About Science and Detectives

Ada Twist and the Perilous Pants book
#1
Ada Twist and the Perilous Pants
Written by Andrea Beaty and illustrated by David Roberts
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-9

In Ada Twist and the Perilous Pants, Ada must rely on her curious mind, her brave spirit, and her best pals Rosie Revere and Iggy Peck to solve a mystery in her own backyard. Ada Twist is full of questions. A scientist to her very core, Ada asks why again and again. One question always leads to another until she’s off on a journey of discovery! When Rosie Revere’s Uncle Ned gets a little carried away wearing his famous helium pants, it’s up to Ada and friends to chase him down. As Uncle Ned floats farther and farther away, Ada starts asking lots of questions: How high can a balloon float? Is it possible for Uncle Ned to float into outer space? And what’s the best plan for getting him down?

The Case of the Gasping Garbage book
#2
The Case of the Gasping Garbage
Written by Michele Torrey and illustrated by Barbara Johansen Newman
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12

Fourth-graders Drake Doyle and Nell Fossey combine their detective and scientific investigation skills to solve a variety of cases involving a noisy garbage can, endangered frogs, a stuck truck, and a mysterious love letter. Includes a section of scientific experiments and activities.

Ada Lace, on the Case book
#3
Ada Lace, on the Case
Written by Tamson Weston and Emily Calandrelli and illustrated by Renee Kurilla
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-10

Ada Lace—third-grade scientist and inventor extraordinaire—has discovered something awful: her neighbor’s beloved Yorkie has been dognapped! With the assistance of a quirky neighbor named Nina (who is convinced an alien took the doggie) and her ever-growing collection of gadgets, Ada sets out to find the wrongdoer. As their investigation becomes more and more mysterious, Ada and Nina grow closer, proving that opposites do, in fact, attract.

Honorable Mentions
  1. The Case of the Terrible T- Rex - Doyle and Fossey, science detectives, are on the case again-and this time they're investigating werewolves on Waxberry Hill, a perilous picnic, a fiesta fiasco, and a dino-disaster…involving a T. rex! Kids will learn all about pressure on the Earth's core, how pollution affects ecology, and more. Plus, budding scientists can try actual experiments!

  2. Escaped - After destroying the permanent X-Point and thwarting the Doctor’s plans for world domination, Daisha and Axel have a new problem: without a permanent X-Point, Earth’s magnetic poles are flipping, causing massive climactic changes around the world. Now they must find a way to expose a new X-Point to stabilize Earth’s magnetic field, all while evading a doomsday cult that would have the world end. Can Axel and Daisha figure out how to find each other and save the world?

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