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Science and Fact Filled: Books For Kids

With all the current emphasis on STEM and STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Art Math), it's no wonder that in recent years there has been an explosion of kid-friendly books on science, and it's absolutely amazing! Now more than ever, children can have exposure to rather complex scientific concepts almost from birth, providing opportunities for their interest to be piqued across a variety of fields from biology and botany to physics and engineering. Many of these stories include the narratives of famous scientists as well, and their personal journeys to persevere against incredible odds to follow their passions and discover new things. Want to feed your burgeoning scientists' mind and introduce them to a variety of scientific disciplines? Without further ado, check out these awesome science titles!

Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Math book
#1
Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Math
Written by Bob Cooper and illustrated by Greg Paprocki, Bob Cooper
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

"Introduces kids to many of the basic concepts of mathematics, including their connection with so many things in our everyday lives."--Back cover.

Mama Dug a Little Den book
#2
Mama Dug a Little Den
Written by Jennifer Ward and illustrated by Steven Jenkins
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-8

There are so many different kinds of dens that mother animals make for their babies, from desert burrows to snow caves to elaborate underground tunnels. Jennifer Ward introduces young readers to all sorts of animals and the cozy burrows they call home in this bouncy, rhyming picture book, illustrated by Caldecott Honoree Steve Jenkins.

Future Astronaut book
#3
Future Astronaut
Written by Lori Alexander and illustrated by Allison Black
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3

Ground Control to Major Baby: Could you be an astronaut? Does baby have what it takes to become an astronaut? That's an affirmative, Houston! Discover all the incredible ways that prove baby already has what it takes to become an astronaut -- from growing healthy teeth to eating from plastic packs to working in small spaces. Includes lots of fun astronaut facts to help prepare little ones for takeoff! Future Baby is an adorable new board book series that takes a playful peek into an assortment of powerful careers and shows little ones how their current skills match up with the job at hand. With Future Baby, babies can be anything!

Mama Built a Little Nest book
#4
Mama Built a Little Nest
Written by Jennifer Ward and illustrated by Steve Jenkins
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Illustrations and simple, rhyming text introduce different kinds of birds' nests, from the scrapes that falcons build atop high, craggy ledges to the underground nests that burrowing owls dig. Includes brief facts about each kind of bird.

Your Amazing Skin from Outside In book
#5
Your Amazing Skin from Outside In
Written by Joanne Settel and illustrated by Bonnie Timmons
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

It’s itchy, it’s sweaty, it’s embarrassing...but most of all, it’s fascinating! Dr. Joanne Settel has all the answers to our most burning questions in this wacky and informative book of poems about our skin. Have you ever wondered… Why you blush when you’re embarrassed? Why you’ve got freckles everywhere? Why your fingers wrinkle in the pool? Why your friends come in all different colors? Why mosquitoes think you’re delicious? Why you’ve got that giant pimple on your nose? Look no further! With supercool facts, clever rhymes, and hilarious illustrations by Bonnie Timmons, acclaimed author Joanne Settel answers all these questions (and more!) in this fascinating, fun exploration of the science of our skin from head to toe. When she’s through, you won’t believe what your skin can do!

  1. Bugs Don't Hug - Meet the mamas and papas of the insect world in this fresh and funny nonfiction look at how bugs are like us from popular science author and teacher Heather Montgomery. Most insects don't take care of their young, but some do--in surprising ways. Some bugs clean up after their messy little ones, cater to their picky eaters, and yes--hug their baby bugs. A fun and clever look at parenting in the insect world, perfect for backyard scientists and their own moms and dads.

  2. Starry Skies - Every night, the sky is filled with stars that tell a thousand tales. Brave warriors, regal queens, fierce beasts -- they all parade across the starry skies each night. In Starry Skies you’ll discover some of the most famous constellations and learn how to find them in the night sky. With brilliant illustrations by Nila Aye, you will see the shapes of each constellation, and imagine what they might look like when you look up into the dark sky above. This introduction to astronomy is all you need to start learning about stars, so get ready, star hunters, and look to the skies!

  3. I, Fly - Fly is fed up with everyone studying butterflies. Flies are so much cooler! They flap their wings 200 times a second, compared to a butterfly's measly five to twelve times. Their babies—maggots—are much cuter than caterpillars (obviously). And when they eat solid food, they even throw up on it to turn it into a liquid. Who wouldn't want to study an insect like that? In an unforgettably fun, fact-filled presentation, this lovable (and highly partisan) narrator promotes his species to a sometimes engrossed, sometimes grossed-out, class of kids.

  4. Many Moons - Many Moons explores every phase of the moon through beautiful illustrations, and compares each phase to a different shape, like a waxing moon and a banana! Many Moons shows young children the different phases of the moon, from the new moon to a waning crescent, with a variety of beautiful, bright illustrations. Each spread features a specific phase of the moon, and compares it to different shapes, such as a cat's tail, a banana, or a brilliant smile. The night sky is vast and beautiful, and to many children, a mysterious thing full of wonder. Why not nurture this sense of early curiosity? Many Moons introduces children to basic astronomy. Understanding the moon is a jumping off point to learning about the stars, space, the ocean tides, and so much more

How to Survive as a Shark book
#10
How to Survive as a Shark
Written by Kristen Foote and illustrated by Erica Salcedo
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-10

Ahoy, me mateys! Upset your Mom swam away after you were born? Cry me an ocean. You’ve got ME to show you the ropes! Well, at least until I get a craving for baby shark. Swim along and I’ll teach you how to hunt using all six senses (a whole sense more than a human), why you can NEVER stop moving (blimey, no - not even to sleep!), and what your most dangerous threat is (here’s a hint: those sneaky landlubbers don’t even live in our waters!). Aye, me hearties, learning How to Survive as a Shark is not as easy as it sounds! How to Survive as a Shark provides a unique take on fish science that will entertain and educate in and out of the classroom. Full of opportunities for extended learning, this book includes fun facts hidden throughout the hilarious illustrated story – and after, a glossary of important terms and some real photos of great white sharks. If you’ve ever wondered how to think and swim like a shark, and you like to laugh while you learn, this book is for you!

How to Survive As a Firefly book
#11
How to Survive As a Firefly
Written by Kristen Foote and illustrated by Erica Salcedo
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-10

Listen up, larvae! I've been in the trenches for the last year and a half, and let me tell you, there is danger lurking behind every tree and headlight. With my expertise, you'll learn how to hunt your first meal (snail soup anyone?), what makes your abdomen glow (put down the fire extinguisher!), and how to react when your mate wants to eat you for dinner (who knew fireflies could be cannibals?). Buck up, buttercup you're in for the flight of your life! If you know what s good for you, you'll stop goofing around and pay attention to How to Survive as a Firefly, or you might never make it to adulthood! How to Survive as a Firefly provides a unique take on insect science that will entertain and educate in and out of the classroom. Full of opportunities for extended learning, this book includes fun facts hidden throughout the hilarious illustrated story and after, a glossary of important terms and some real firefly photos. If you've ever wondered how these fascinating beetles grow and glow and you like to laugh while you learn this book is for you!

Science Comics: The Brain book
#12
Science Comics: The Brain
Written by Tory Woollcott and illustrated by Alex Graudins
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-13

With Science Comics, you can explore the depths of the ocean, the farthest reaches of space, and everything in between! These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. In this volume, Fahama has been kidnapped by a mad scientist and his zombie assistant, and they are intent on stealing her brain! She'll need to learn about the brain as fast as possible in order to plan her escape! How did the brain evolve? How do our senses work in relation to the brain? How do we remember things? What makes you, YOU? Get an inside look at the human brain, the most advanced operating system in the world . . . if you have the nerve!

Science Comics: Flying Machines book
#13
Science Comics: Flying Machines
Written by Alison Wilgus and illustrated by Molly Brooks
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12

Take to the skies with Flying Machines! Follow the famous aviators from their bicycle shop in Dayton, Ohio, to the fields of North Carolina where they were to make their famous flights. In an era of dirigibles and hot air balloons, the Wright Brothers were among the first innovators of heavier than air flight. But in the hotly competitive international race toward flight, Orville and Wilbur were up against a lot more than bad weather. Mechanical failures, lack of information, and even other aviators complicated the Wright Brothers’ journey. Though they weren’t as wealthy as their European counterparts, their impressive achievements demanded attention on the international stage. Thanks to their carefully recorded experiments and a healthy dash of bravery, the Wright Brothers’ flying machines took off.

    Did you enjoy our children's book recommendations? Did we miss one of your favorites? Let us know in the comments below!