Technology: Books For Kids

Looking for a list of the best children's books about technology?

Children’s literature has many notable options when it comes to technology. To help you find the right books for you and your young reader, we’ve compiled a list of the best kids books about technology.

Our list includes board books, picture books, and chapter books. Board books are best for babies and toddlers from ages newborn to 2 or 3. Picture books are generally great options for toddlers and for preschool and kindergarten age children. Picture books are especially enjoyable for adults to read aloud with young kids. The chapter books on our list are generally best for elementary through early middle school age tween kids. You can filter to sort by the best book type for your kid.

When it comes to children’s stories about technology, there are a variety of titles. This list covers everything, from classics like Wodney Wat’s Wobot to popular sellers like The Wild Robot to some of our favorite hidden gems like Boy and Bot.

We hope this list of kids books about technology can be a helpful resource for parents, teachers, and others searching for a new book! As you explore the list, please comment below to let us know what books you would add.

The Big Ideas of Buster Bickles book
#1
The Big Ideas of Buster Bickles
Written and illustrated by Dave Wasson
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Buster Bickles’s big ideas are always getting him into trouble. But when Buster gets to test the newly invented What-if Machine, anything Buster imagines becomes reality. Packed with rivers of chocolate, robot dinosaurs, and eggs-ray vision, the world becomes Buster’s creation in this fantastically creative picture book by debut author-illustrator Dave Wasson.

Look at Me, I'm a Robot! book
#2
Look at Me, I'm a Robot!
Written by Anna Nilsen and illustrated by Sebastian Braun
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-4

Features pictures of robots, with die-cut eye holes so readers can use the book as a mask.

Norton and Alpha book
#3
Norton and Alpha
Written and illustrated by Kristyna Litten
picture book
Recommend Ages: 2-7

Battered wheels, rusty cogs, broken springs: Norton, an adorable robot, collects this junk and uses it to create amazing inventions. But one day he and his dog Alpha find something they ve never seen before: a flower! At first, they re baffled . . . but when a seed blossoms into a flowery field, the two discover the true magic of nature. Includes a big, stunning gatefold!”

Robots, Robots Everywhere book
#4
Robots, Robots Everywhere
Written by Sue Fliess and illustrated by Bob Staake
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-5
Thoughts from Mom of Boys

I liked how this story showed that robots are machines and how they work in real life examples. It still had a cute rhyming pattern and simple wording that little ones can understand and enjoy!

Rhyming text explains all the things robots do, from exploring other planets to milking cows.

Boy and Bot book
#5
Boy and Bot
Written by Ame Dyckman and illustrated by Dan Yaccarino
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-5

The story of an irresistible friendship between a boy and a robot, now in board for little hands. One day, a boy and a robot meet in the woods. They play. They have fun. But when Bot gets switched off, Boy thinks he’s sick! So Boy tucks the bot into bed and falls asleep. Bot is worried when he powers on and finds his friend powered off. He takes Boy home with him and tries all his remedies: oil, reading an instruction manual. Nothing revives the malfunctioning boy! Can the Inventor help fix him? Using the perfect blend of sweetness and humor, this story of an adorable duo will win the hearts of the very youngest readers.

  1. Love, Z - From the creator of Not Quite Narwhal comes the story of a young robot trying to find the meaning of “love.” When a small robot named Z discovers a message in a bottle signed “Love, Beatrice,” they decide to find out what “love” means. Unable to get an answer from the other robots, they leave to embark on an adventure that will lead them to Beatrice—and back home again, where love was hiding all along.

  2. Robot Activated! - When a train hauling teddy bears to the fair derails in the middle of a storm, it’s a disaster! Who will come to their rescue? Thank goodness Rescue Robot is on the job! But the train is stuck deep in the mud. Will the task be too difficult for Rescue Robot or will his persistence pay off? Kids will love this rhyming story about not giving up on your goal. Includes bonus downloads of coloring pages and the Rescue Robot board game!

  3. Wodney Wat's Wobot - When Wodney Wat, who cannot pronounce the letter R, gets a talking robot for his birthday, it turns out to be more than just a fun gift.

  4. My Mom Is a Robot - My mom may look a little different, but she is just like other moms. She loves me and takes care of me. It just happens she can also compute pi to infinity. Doesn’t your mom do that? A fun book for ages 3-6.

The Robot Book book
#10
The Robot Book
Written and illustrated by Heather Brown
board book
Recommend Ages: 3-5
Thoughts from The Fun Uncle

This is a really fun book with lots of physical interaction options. There are lots of gears to turn, windows to open, slides to move, etc. I loved the moral of the story that comes in near the end.

Richly illustrated, interactive book answers the question: “What makes a robot tick?â€

This robot has two eyes, two arms, and two legs, but what really makes him tick? Inside The Robot Book, Heather Brown answers that question within an interactive story that features actual working—and moving—parts. Gears and cogs are mounted on each illustration to keep little fingers and imaginations engaged.

While the junior engineer is tinkering away, parents will also be charmed by the story’s warm text, which reveals the true secret behind what makes our robot tick. Here’s a little hint: It isn’t a gear, or bolt, or some other mechanical part, it’s what’s in his heart that counts the most. Perfect for year-round gift-giving, the book will be packaged inside a protective poly-bag.

Clink book
#11
Clink
Written by Kelly DiPucchio and illustrated by Matthew Myers
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7
Thoughts from Mr. Staccato

Clink has a hard time standing out when compared to the other fancy, colorful robots in the shop. He tries to keep up, but he’s just a little too old, and honestly, starting to fall apart. His luck changes one day when a peculiar young boy with a love for music hears Clink belting out an old fashioned tune.

Clink was a state-of-the-art robot with the dazzling ability to make toast and play music at the same time. But that was many years ago.

Now kids want snazzier robots who do things like play baseball and bake cookies. So day after day, Clink sits on a shelf and sadly watches as his friends leave with their new owners. He almost gives up on ever finding a home—until the day Clink spies a boy who just might be able to be the right one for him. . . .

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Kelly DiPucchio and new talent Matthew Myers comes a funny and heartwarming story that lovers of Corduroy will adore.

If You're a Robot and You Know It book
#12
If You're a Robot and You Know It
Written by David A. Carter
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5

From bestseller David Carter comes a favorite new robot twist on the classic children’s song that pops to life.

If you’re a robot and you know it clap your hands, jump and beep, fly around, shoot laser beams out of your eyes!

It’s the classic version of If You’re Happy and You Know It as you’ve never seen (or heard!) it before. Sing along to the free downloadable song by the dynamic Musical Robot team, then turn the pages as David Carter’s clever pop-ups show the robot characters going through all of the call-out movements, from clapping hands to shooting laser beams out of your eyes!

Includes:

  • A free downloadable song from the Musical Robot team!
  • Pull-tabs, turn-wheels, and pop-ups!
  • Eye-catching foil cover!
Robot book
#13
Robot
Written and illustrated by DK Publishing
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12

“From automata created by Leonardo Da Vinci to modern-day androids and animal robots, this book covers artificial intelligence (AI) throughout history. Discover the latest at the cutting edge of robotics, where science, technology, mechanical engineering, and computing meet as [the book] explains how robots work, how they are made, and how they help and sometimes hinder in modern society”—Publisher marketing.

Robotics for Babies book
#14
Robotics for Babies
Written and illustrated by Chris Ferrie
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3

Help your future genius become the smartest baby in the room by introducing them to robotics with the next installment of the Baby University board book series! Set the children in your life on a lifelong path to learning with the next installment of the Baby University board book series. Full of scientific and mathematical information from an expert, this is the perfect book to teach complex concepts in a simple, engaging way. Robotics for Babies is a colorful, simple introduction to the technology behind robots. It’s never too early to become a scientist!

  1. House of Robots: Robot Revolution - Robots on strike! Sammy’s underappreciated mechanical helpers are causing chaos in book 3 of the bestselling House of Robots series. After a few early glitches in their relationship, Sammy and his “bro-bot” E are now fast friends. In fact, E is such a valued member of the family that the other electronic occupants of the House of Robots are feeling sorely unappreciated. And when Sammy’s inventor mom becomes distracted by a top-secret project, the robots soon begin to fall into disrepair. Cue a robot revolt, with the droids wreaking harmless havoc in the house! Armed with pranks like glue in the shampoo bottles and flying toast missiles, the robots demand to be cared for. It’s up to Sammy and his disabled sister Maddie to keep the peace until his mom reveals her secret project…and why it was worth the wait.

  2. Who is the Coolest One? Story about Robots - We often judge everyone by their appearance. It is not right. This story was written by a four-year-old boy who is very fond of robots. The little rusty robot has no friends. He was even called Nobody. Everyone loves the bright robot Giant. But will it always be so? Giant fell into a big dirty pit. And only one robot will be ready to help. Soon we will know - who is a real hero!

  3. The Three Little Aliens and the Big Bad Robot - Ejected from their new homes by a Big Bad Robot who pursues them into space, three little aliens engage in a noisy interplanetary chase that introduces youngsters to the solar system. By the award-winning author of The Pumpkin Patch.

  4. The Wild Robot - When robot Roz opens her eyes for the first time, she discovers that she is alone on a remote, wild island. Why is she there? Where did she come from? And, most important, how will she survive in her harsh surroundings? Roz’s only hope is to learn from the island’s hostile animal inhabitants. When she tries to care for an orphaned gosling, the other animals finally decide to help, and the island starts to feel like home. Until one day, the robot’s mysterious past comes back to haunt her…. Heartwarming and full of action, Peter Brown’s middle-grade debut raises thought-provoking questions about the environment, the role technology plays in our world, and what it means to be alive.

The Robot Ransom book
#19
The Robot Ransom
Written and illustrated by Gertrude Chandler Warner
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 7-10

Henry and Jessie’s middle school robotics team is going to the regional competition! But it seems like someone doesn’t want their team to compete. Can the Aldens use their sleuthing skills and what they’ve learned about robotics to find the culprit and save the day?

Little Robot book
#20
Little Robot
Written and illustrated by Ben Hatke
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-9

When a little girl finds an adorable robot in the woods, she presses a button and accidentally activates him for the first time. Now, she finally has a friend. But the big, bad robots are coming to collect the little guy for nefarious purposes, and it’s all up to a five-year-old armed only with a wrench and a fierce loyalty to her mechanical friend to save the day! #1 New York Times Bestselling author Ben Hatke brings his signature sweetness to a simple, moving story about friendship and overcoming fears that will appeal to readers of all ages.

When Charlie McButton Lost Power book
#21
When Charlie McButton Lost Power
Written by Suzanne Collins and illustrated by Mike Lester
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Charlie McButton likes computer games so much, he never plays with anything else. When a thunderstorm knocks out the electricity, his tech empire comes tumbling down, and his whole world loses power. Charlie needs batteries?FAST! But the only triple- A?s he can find are in his little sister?s talking doll. Will he resort to desperate measures and cause his sister to have a meltdown of her own? Or will he snap out of his computer craze long enough to realize his sister might be fun, even if she doesn?t come with batteries? Collins and Lester team up for a hilarious and timely tale that will crack up young computer addicts and those who love them!

Believe book
#22
Believe
Written and illustrated by Robert Sabuda
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

Consummate pop-up master Robert Sabuda offers an elegant ode to possibility that will inspire anyone setting off on a new life chapter. All of life’s possibilities are just a page turn away in this beautiful pop-up book from renowned paper artist Robert Sabuda. Throughout, phrases and images evoking potential (an acorn, an egg, a paper airplane) are answered by a glorious 3-D image on the following spread (a towering tree, a flock of birds, a rocket soaring upward). An ideal gift for graduates from kindergarten to college and beyond, Believe is the perfect way to celebrate life’s passages and look forward to new horizons.

Adi Sorts with Variables book
#23
Adi Sorts with Variables
Written by Caroline Karanja and illustrated by Ben William Whitehouse
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

It’s time to clean Adi’s room! If only a computer could do it for her! That gives Adi and her best friend Gabi an idea-think like a coder! These scientific thinkers put on their computer coding caps and make cleaning up a snap by sorting with variables!

  1. Off the Track - From the author of To the Lighthouse comes a new adventure for young readers about falling in love with the bush, and with hiking and being in the wild. It’s about disconnecting from technology and discovering yourself. Harry’s perfect life was straying way off-track. He looked pleadingly at Mum. Surely she could see? Spending an entire weekend tramping around stinking-hot, snake-filled scrub was a horrible mistake. But doing it without a phone? That was just brutal. As it turns out, it was only the beginning …

  2. Samuel Morse, That's Who! - Back in the 1800s, information traveled slowly. Who would dream of instant messages? Samuel Morse, that’s who! Who traveled to France, where the famous telegraph towers relayed 10,000 possible codes for messages depending on the signal arm positions—only if the weather was clear? Who imagined a system that would use electric pulses to instantly carry coded messages between two machines, rain or shine? Long before the first telephone, who changed communication forever? Samuel Morse, that’s who! This dynamic and subtsantive biography celebrates an early technology pioneer. Perfect for fans of Gene Barretta’s popular inventor series.

  3. Timmy's Monster Diary: Screen Time Stress - Meet Timmy, a lovable monster who can’t get enough of the coolest gadgets and video games. Too bad he doesn’t realize how much time he spends each day in front of a screen. In the same humorous spirit of Diary of a Wimpy Kid comes Timmy’s Monster Diary: Screen Time Stress. Using the “Time-Telling” and “ST4” techniques developed by Dr. Raun Melmed of the Melmed Center in Arizona, Timmy’s Monster Diary teaches kids how to self-monitor the amount of time they spend on technology. Timmy’s hilarious doodles and diary entries chronicle his delightful adventures, misadventures, and eventual triumph in a funny, relatable way. It’s the one book that kids will want to turn off the TV and read! Timmy’s Monster Diary also includes a resource section to help parents and teachers implement Dr. Melmed’s methods, plus ST4 reminders that kids can remove, color, and place around the house.

  4. Revenge Of The Enginerds - Ken and his EngiNerds crew return in a new, nutty and nerdy adventure that’s the perfect follow-up to EngiNerds. When last we met, the EngiNerds were battling a horde of ravenous robots, but in this latest caper, they’re on the hunt for just one rogue robot. But who knows what kind of mayhem one mechanical creature can cause? And why is Ken the only EngiNerd who’s worried about the runaway robot? The rest of the crew seems be missing in action and Ken fears it’s because of Mikaela Harrington. She’s the new girl in town who’s UFO and alien-obsessed and wants to join the EngiNerds. But as far as Ken is concerned, the EngiNerds are Y-chromosome only, no X’s allowed! Will Ken allow a rogue robot and a know-it-all, genius girl to wreak havoc on the entire universe? He just might not have a choice!

When Bill Gates Memorized an Encyclopedia book
#28
When Bill Gates Memorized an Encyclopedia
Written by Mark Andrew Weakland and illustrated by Jeffrey Ebbeler
picture book
Recommend Ages: 8-11

Bill Gates is known as the richest man in the world. But do you know what he was like as a child? From selling peanuts to memorizing entire encyclopedias, Bill used his brain. This playful story of his childhood will help young readers connect with a historic figure and will inspire them to want to achieve greatness.

Sleepover Scientist #3 book
#29
Sleepover Scientist #3
Written by Kelly Starling Lyons and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton and Nneka Myers
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-8

Jada Jones is back for the third book of this popular, celebrated series perfect for STEM fans!

Jada is hosting her first sleepover, and she has lots of cool scientific activities planned: kitchen chemistry, creating invisible ink, and even making slime! But when her friends get tired of the lessons and just want to hang out, can Jada figure out the formula for fun and save the sleepover?

What's the Matter with the Three Little Pigs? book
#30
What's the Matter with the Three Little Pigs?
Written by Thomas Kingsley Troupe and illustrated by Jomike Tejido
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

What’s the matter with the three little pigs? They’re being tormented by a hungry wolf! And no matter what kind of matter they use to build their homes, it doesn’t matter. The STEM-savvy, rhyme-loving wolf in this fractured fairy tale always seems to spoil the day. A glossary and critical thinking questions support the story’s physics content.

Jazzy Jessie: Going for Gold book
#31
Jazzy Jessie: Going for Gold
Written by Emma Moss
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-11

Jessie has always loved coming from a large family, but things get tough when her father unexpectedly loses his job. Money is suddenly tight and Jessie’s mum has to take on more shifts at the hospital. The one silver lining is that Dad is around to care for Jessie’s younger brothers after school, so Jessie has more time to work on her gymnastics. It isn’t long before her coach persuades her to enter a big competition. He thinks she’s in with a shot at gold - if she puts in the time. But there are only so many hours in a day, and Jessie is constantly running late for either practice or a Girls Can Vlog meeting. Can she fit both gymnastics and vlogging into her busy life - or is she going to have to choose between two very different dreams? An inspirational story about the power of vlogging - complete with tips for making your own vlogs!

The Exact Location of Home book
#32
The Exact Location of Home
Written by Kate Messner
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Kate Messner pens a new moving tale of family and friendship about a tech-savvy boy searching for his father during tough times. Kirby “Zig” Zigonski lives for the world of simple circuits, light bulbs, buzzers, and motors. Electronics are, after all, much more predictable than most people—especially his father, who he hasn’t seen in over a year. When his dad’s latest visit is canceled with no explanation and his mom seems to be hiding something, Zig turns to his best friend Gianna and a new gizmo—a garage sale GPS unit—for help. Convinced that his dad is leaving clues around town to explain his absence, Zig sets out to find him. Following one clue after another, logging mile after mile, Zig soon discovers that people aren’t always what they seem . . . and sometimes, there’s more than one set of coordinates for home. An important story of love and hope that will capture readers’ hearts, The Exact Location of Home is another must read from beloved author Kate Messner.

  1. Enginerds - The battle between boys and bots is on in this funny, fast-paced novel. Ken is an EngiNerd: one of a super-smart group of friends—all nerds—who have been close since kindergarten. They may be brainiacs, but they’re just like everyone else: they fight with one another, watch too much TV, eat Chinese food, and hate walking their dogs. Well, maybe not just like everyone because Ken’s best friend Dan has been building robots. He then secretly sent one to each of the EngiNerds, never letting them know he’s the mastermind. At first Ken is awed and delighted: what kid hasn’t dreamed of having a robot all their own? Someone who can be their friend, clean their room, walk the dog, answer homework questions…how amazing is that? But be careful what you wish for: Dan’s robot, Greeeg, may look innocent, but his ravenous consumption of food—comestibles—turns him into a butt-blasting bot. And once the other robots ‘come alive’ it’s up to the motley crew of EngiNerds to not only save the day, but save the planet!

  2. Lights, Music, Code! - When Maya starts spending a lot of time with Maddie, an old friend, her friends from coding club worry she won’t finish her part of the project, coding the lights and music for the winter dance.

  3. Selfie Sebastian - Sebastian is one handsome fox. So why can’t he take the perfect selfie? In his quest to get the shot of his dreams, he sets off on an elaborate journey from the Grand Canyon all the way to the moon. But nothing works. Could it be that the secret to his special selfie is right where he started—at home with his friends?

  4. Girls Who Code - Part how-to, part girl-empowerment, and all fun, from the leader of the movement championed by Sheryl Sandberg, Malala Yousafzai, and John Legend. Since 2012, the organization Girls Who Code has taught computing skills to and inspired over 40,000 girls across America. Now its founder, Reshma Saujani, wants to inspire you to be a girl who codes! Bursting with dynamic artwork, down-to-earth explanations of coding principles, and real-life stories of girls and women working at places like Pixar and NASA, this graphically animated book shows what a huge role computer science plays in our lives and how much fun it can be. No matter your interest—sports, the arts, baking, student government, social justice—coding can help you do what you love and make your dreams come true. Whether you’re a girl who’s never coded before, a girl who codes, or a parent raising one, this entertaining book, printed in bold two-color and featuring art on every page, will have you itching to create your own apps, games, and robots to make the world a better place.

Team BFF book
#37
Team BFF
Written and illustrated by Stacia Deutsch
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

After signing up for a “hackathon” day of coding, Sophia and her coding club friends welcome a robotics expert into their group, but find their teamwork challenged by conflicting opinions.

Gabi's If/Then Garden book
#38
Gabi's If/Then Garden
Written by Caroline Karanja and illustrated by Ben William Whitehouse and Caroline Karanja
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

Gabi’s garden needs some help. Where to begin? Gabi and her best friend Adi use if/then statements to decide what to plant, what to water, and what to pick! These scientific thinkers find ways every day to use computer coding concepts to make work and play more fun!

The Friendship Code book
#39
The Friendship Code
Written and illustrated by Stacia Deutsch
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Loops, variables, input/output – Lucy can’t wait to get started with the new coding club at school. Finally, an after school activity that she’s really interested in. But Lucy’s excitement turns to disappointment when she’s put into a work group with girls she barely knows. All she wanted to do was make an app that she believes will help someone very special to her. Suddenly, Lucy begins to get cryptic coding messages and needs some help translating them. She soon discovers that coding – and friendship – takes time, dedication, and some laughs!

Spotlight on Coding Club! book
#40
Spotlight on Coding Club!
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Perfect for fans of The Babysitters Club and anyone interested in computer science, this series is published in partnership with the organization Girls Who Code! It’s almost time for the talent show at school, and Erin couldn’t be more excited. It’s her time to take center stage! Plus, she and her friends from coding club are putting together an awesome coding program for the show. But Erin has a big secret: she has anxiety. And when things start piling up at home and school, she starts having trouble handling everything. Her friends from coding club have always been there for her, but will they be as understanding when the going gets tough? Sometimes in coding—like in friendship—things don’t go exactly as planned, but the outcome can be even better than you’d imagined.

Gabi's Fabulous Functions book
#41
Gabi's Fabulous Functions
Written by Caroline Karanja and illustrated by Ben William Whitehouse
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

Computer coding in the kitchen? Yes! Best friends Gabi and Adi are baking a special birthday treat-and making a recipe is a lot like creating a function in a computer code. These scientifically minded junior programmers are always on the lookout for ways to work coding concepts into their day with Code Play!

  1. Move on Up That Beanstalk, Jack! - When times are tough, you pull yourself up and push yourself to the top … of a beanstalk … where you might get schooled in forces and motion by a STEM-loving giant named Dennis. At least that’s what happens to Jack in this delicious twist on a classic fairy tale, supported by critical thinking questions and a glossary of key physics terms.

  2. A Dream of Flight - Years before the invention of the modern airplane, Alberto Santos-Dumont dreamed of flying. As a boy, he was mesmerized by the machinery on his father’s coffee plantation in Brazil and went on to study science and engineering in France. Soon his groundbreaking—and sometimes silly—inventions became the talk of Paris, especially after he set his sights on building an airship that could bring the world’s people together. His small stature and big ideas earned him the nickname “Le Petite Santos.” This is the story of Santos’s successful race for the Deutsche Prize, and his many failures along the way. Chock-full of cool diagrams, charming Parisian scenes, and graphic novel-style spot illustrations, A Dream of Flight will have young readers looking to the sky and scheming up their own aerial inventions.

  3. Double Trouble - Beep and Bob accidentally clone themselves for the school science fair in this fourth book in the hilarious, action-packed Beep and Bob series! What’s twice as fun as Beep and Bob? Two Beeps and Bobs! While up too late working on his science fair project, Bob accidentally points a duplication ray at Beep. To his shock, another Beep appears! Beep decides the more, the better, so he points the ray at Bob and PRESTO: it’s Bob 2 (or Backwards Bob). At first Bob thinks their clones are creepy, but it doesn’t take long to realize that having duplicates comes with perks: they can sleep in while their clones go to class! Then the real Beep and Bob discover a hitch: the Beep and Bob clones are EVIL, and are planning to duplicate an EVIL Earth to rule! How will they possibly get themselves (and themselves!) out of this one?

  4. Adi's Perfect Patterns and Loops - Best friends Adi and Gabi love to play with Adi’s toy train. Round and round it goes-choo choo! Watching it loop the track gives the girls an idea. These scientific thinkers use their computer coding knowledge to put the train to work!

Ada Lace And The Suspicious Artist book
#46
Ada Lace And The Suspicious Artist
Written by Emily Calandrelli and illustrated by Renee Kurilla
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-10

From Emily Calandrelli—Emmy-nominated host of Xploration Outer Space, correspondent on Bill Nye Saves the World, and graduate of MIT—comes the fifth novel in a fun illustrated chapter book series about an eight-year-old girl with a knack for science, math, and solving mysteries with technology.

Third grader and inventor extraordinaire Ada Lace is on spring break. But it’s just a little less relaxing than she’d imagined. Nina is beside herself with excitement about meeting her favorite artist and enlists Ada and Mr. Peebles’s coding-whiz nephew to help revamp her online portfolio.

When Nina finally meets Miroir, he snubs her, and her confidence is shaken—but not enough to miss the art show opening. While there, Ada spots a suspiciously familiar painting that may mean Miroir isn’t the original he claims to be.

Will the friends be able to reveal the artist’s true nature, before he fools someone else?

Who Says Women Can't Be Computer Programmers? book
#47
Who Says Women Can't Be Computer Programmers?
Written by Tanya Lee Stone and illustrated by Marjorie Priceman
picture book
Recommend Ages: 6-9

A picture book biography of Ada Lovelace, the woman recognized today as history’s first computer programmer—she imagined them 100 years before they existed! In the early nineteenth century lived Ada Byron: a young girl with a wild and wonderful imagination. The daughter of internationally acclaimed poet Lord Byron, Ada was tutored in science and mathematics from a very early age. But Ada’s imagination was never meant to be tamed and, armed with the fundamentals of math and engineering, she came into her own as a woman of ideas—equal parts mathematician and philosopher. From her whimsical beginnings as a gifted child to her most sophisticated notes on Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine, this book celebrates the woman recognized today as the first computer programmer. A Christy Ottaviano Book

Hello Ruby: Journey Inside the Computer book
#48
Hello Ruby: Journey Inside the Computer
Written by Linda Liukas
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

What exactly is a computer? How does it work? What is it made of? Learn all this and more with Ruby! In Ruby’s world anything is possible if you put your mind to it—even fixing her father’s broken computer! Join Ruby and her new friend, Mouse, on an imaginative journey through the insides of a computer in search of the missing Cursor. From bits and logic gates to computer hardware, in Journey Inside the Computer, Ruby (and her readers!) will learn the basic elements of the machines that power our world. Then future kid coders can put their knowledge and imaginations to work with fun activities. Praise for Linda Liukas and the Hello Ruby series: “[Linda Liukas] wants kids to understand and embrace basic computer logic, so that they later formulate code in the same effortless and creative way they build structures with LEGO.” —The Wall Street Journal “Hello Ruby by Linda Liukas is half picture book and half activity book rolled into one adorable package. What I love about it is that it introduces programming without requiring a computer at all.” —GeekMom.com

Baby Code! Music book
#49
Baby Code! Music
Written by Sandra Horning and illustrated by Melissa Crowton
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3

It’s never too early to get little ones interested in computer coding with this unique series of board books! How do you explain coding in music to a baby? By showing how it’s all around them, and how they can take part in it, of course! By using experiences common in a baby’s world, like hearing a melody from a mobile or tapping on an electronic xylophone, this charming board book full of bright, colorful illustrations is the perfect introduction to coding in music for babies and their caregivers–and is sure to leave them wanting to learn more!

Baby Code! Art book
#50
Baby Code! Art
Written by Sandra Horning and illustrated by Melissa Crowton
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3

It’s never too early to get little ones interested in computer coding with this unique series of board books! How do you explain coding in art to a baby? By showing how it’s all around them, and how they can take part in it, of course! By using items in a baby’s world, like a camera or a block made from a 3D printer, this charming board book full of bright, colorful illustrations is the perfect introduction to coding in art for babies and their caregivers–and is sure to leave them wanting to learn more!

  1. Goldilocks - Everyone loves Goldilocks’ hilarious online videos, but in her quest to get more likes, more laughs and more hits, she tries something a little more daring: stealing porridge #pipinghot, breaking chairs #fun, and using someone else’s bed #sleep. What will Daddy Bear do when he sees that online? A hilarious cautionary tale for a new generation of internet-users from the prize-winning partnership of Jeanne Willis and Tony Ross.

  2. Baby Code! - It’s never too early to get little ones interested in computer coding with this unique series of board books! How do you explain coding to a baby? By showing how it’s all around them, and how they can take part in it, of course! By using items common in a baby’s world, like a teddy bear and electric train, this charming board book full of bright, colorful illustrations is the perfect introduction to coding for babies and their caregivers—and is sure to leave them wanting to learn more!

  3. One Trick Pony - The aliens have arrived. And they’re hungry for electricity. In the Earth of the future, humans are on the run from an alien force—giant blobs who suck up electrical devices wherever they can find them. Strata and her family are part of a caravan of digital rescuers, hoping to keep the memory of civilization alive by saving electronics wherever they can. Many humans have reverted to a pre-electrical age, and others have taken advantage of the invasion to become dangerous bandits and outlaws. When Strata and her brother are separated from the caravan, they must rely on a particularly beautiful and rare robot pony to escape the outlaws and aliens—and defeat the invaders once and for all.

  4. Lost Book - A rabbit who prefers real-life adventures to stories finds a lost book that takes him on an exciting journey in this charming picture book about the power of tales to inspire children and bring them together. Everyone in Rabbit Town loves to read. Well, everyone except for Henry, who would much prefer to play outside. Then Henry finds a lost book, and when he tries to track down the owner, he stumbles into the human world. There, the adults are all absorbed in their phones and tablets, and everyone ignores Henry until he befriends a young girl. They have so much fun together that Henry gives her the lost book, knowing it will be in good hands. Henry learns that books can contain adventures all their own, and when he returns to Rabbit Town, for the first time it is Henry who tells the bedtime story.

R Is for Robot book
#55
R Is for Robot
Written and illustrated by Adam F. Watkins
board book
Recommend Ages: 3-5

These noisy robots make the alphabet a hilarious adventure!

In this noisy alphabet book, Adam F. Watkins’s silly robots are building the alphabet. Featuring hilarious robots making goofy noises, this alphabet book is perfect for young readers.

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