concept

discovering similarities Quotes

Nine of the best book quotes about discovering similarities
  1. #1
    “Though good and bad men suffer alike, we must not suppose that there is no difference between the men themselves.”
  2. #2
    ″‘That was the night, in the kitchen, that I realized I was no better than who I was....And I no longer felt angry at Waverly. I felt tired and foolish, as if I had been running to escape someone chasing me, only to look behind and discover there was no one there.‘”
  3. #3
    “We all have disabilities. What’s yours?”
  4. #4
    “The gray-green surface changes to the bright colors of our three images, sharpening and deepening all at once. And although we don’t speak, I know we all see it: Together we look like our mother. Her same eyes, her same mouth, open in surprise to see, at last, her long-cherished wish.”
  5. #5
    “Aside from family and friends, the men I most trusted all had something in common: they all wore the uniform of the United States of America.”
  6. #6
    “Everything is Dual; everything has poles; everything has its pair of opposites; like and unlike are the same; opposites are identical in nature, but different in degree; extremes meet; all truths are but half-truths; all paradoxes may be reconciled.”
  7. #7
    “Dee Dee knew that what happened to one happened to most of us. Our lives were not so different – even though we liked to think so.”
  8. #8
    “I could look at nothing else in the world but his face, more hideous than any other in the animal kingdom because of its similarity to our own, yet in its way more noble than any Greek ideal of perfection.”
  9. #9
    “All had intellectual fathers, domestic mothers. All three were raised in settings that simultaneously encouraged and thwarted their love of learning. All three married men who supported their intellectual ambitions. All three lived through the wrenching deaths of loved ones and terrifying, fratricidal warfare—the Hundred Years War in Christine’s case, the American Civil War in Stanton’s, and World War I for Woolf. All three identified with women yet imagined becoming male. In their work and in their lives, all three writers addressed an enduring puzzle: Are differences between the sexes innate or learned? Using stories about the past to challenge history, they talked back to books.”