concept

Life Quotes

100+ of the best book quotes about life
  1. #1
    One of the strange things about living in the world is that it is only now and then one is quite sure one is going to live forever and ever and ever. One knows it sometimes when one gets up at the tender solemn dawn-time and goes out and stands alone and throws one’s head far back and looks up and up and watches the pale sky slowly changing and flushing and marvelous unknown things happening until the East almost makes one cry out and one’s heart stands still at the strange unchanging majesty of the rising of the sun—which has been happening every morning for thousands and thousands and thousands of years. One knows it then for a moment or so.
  2. #2
    “To live will be an awfully big adventure.”
  3. #3
    “Dear old world’, she murmured, ‘you are very lovely, and I am glad to be alive in you.”
  4. #4
    We’re always thinking of eternity as an idea that cannot be understood, something immense. But why must it be? What if, instead of all this, you suddenly find just a little room there, something like a village bath-house, grimy, and spiders in every corner, and that’s all eternity is. Sometimes, you know, I can’t help feeling that that’s what it is.
  5. #5
    “The blood is the life!”
  6. #6
    “But people will do anything rather than admit that their lives have no meaning. No use, that is. No plot.”
  7. #7
    “Life is always a rich and steady time when you are waiting for something to happen or to hatch.”
  8. #8
    “Everyone seems to have a clear idea of how other people should lead their lives, but none about his or her own.”
  9. #9
    “The truth is I’m not good at enjoying life.”
  10. #10
    Only to live, to live and live! Life, whatever it may be!
  11. #11
    “Life appears to me too short to be spent in nursing animosity or registering wrongs.”
  12. #12
    “Frying chicken always makes me feel a little better about life.”
  1. #13
    “Life is infinitely stranger than anything which the mind of man could invent. We would not dare to conceive the things which are really mere commonplaces of existence. If we could fly out of that window hand in hand, hover over this great city, gently remove the roofs, and and peep in at the queer things which are going on, the strange coincidences, the plannings, the cross-purposes, the wonderful chains of events, working through generations, and leading to the most outre results, it would make all fiction with its conventionalities and foreseen conclusions most stale and unprofitable.”
  2. #14
    “We ask for long life, but ‘tis deep life, or grand moments, that signify. Let the measure of time be spiritual, not mechanical.”
  3. #15
    “In three words, I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life. It goes on.”
    author
    Robert Frost
    concept
    Life
  4. #16
    “You are my life now.”
  5. #17
    “Life itself is the most wonderful fairy tale.”
  6. #18
    “Rejoice with us,” said the air and the sunlight. “Enjoy thine own bright life in the fresh air.”
    But the tree would not rejoice, though it grew taller every day; and, winter and summer, its dark-green foliage might be seen in the forest, while passers by would say, “What a beautiful tree!”
  7. #19
    “Follow what feels good in the moment, every moment, and it will lead you through a most excellent life.”
  8. #20
    “My life used to be full of everything. Now if you aren’t with me I haven’t a thing in the world.”
  9. #21
    “One can’t live with one’s finger everlastingly on one’s pulse.”
  10. #22
    “Droll thing life is -- that mysterious arrangement of merciless logic for a futile purpose. The most you can hope from it is some knowledge of yourself -- that comes too late -- a crop of inextinguishable regrets.”
  11. #23
    Experience is the only thing that brings knowledge, and the longer you are on earth the more experience you are sure to get.
  12. #24
    “To move, to breathe, to fly, to float,
    To gain all while you give,
    To roam the roads of lands remote,
    To travel is to live.”
  1. #25
    “Of course, in a novel, people’s hearts break, and they die, and that is the end of it; and in a story this is very convenient. But in real life we do not die when all that makes life bright dies to us. There is a most busy and important round of eating, drinking, dressing, walking, visiting, buying, selling, talking, reading, and all that makes up what is commonly called living, yet to be gone through…”
  2. #26
    Life is made up of sobs, sniffles, and smiles, with sniffles predominating.
  3. #27
    “For life be, after all, only a waitin’ for somethin’ else than what we’re doin’; and death be all that we can rightly depend on.”
    author
    Bram Stoker
    book
    Dracula
    character
    Mina Murray
    concepts
    DeathLife
  4. #28
    “Up ahead they’s a thousan’ lives we might live, but when it comes it’ll on’y be one.”
  5. #29
    “Never has it felt more important for me to tell stories of joy and abandon, passion and recklessness. Life is short and difficult, people. We must take our pleasures where we can find them. Let us not become so cautious that we forget to live.”
  6. #30
    “How can I live without thee, how forgoe
    Thy sweet Converse and Love so dearly joyn’d?”
  7. #31
    Life is going to give you just what you put in it. Put your whole heart in everything you do, and pray, then you can wait.
  8. #32
    “Live faithfully, fight bravely, and die laughing.”
  9. #33
    “We rise again in the grass. In the flowers. In songs.”
  10. #34
    “It is the experiences, the memories, the great triumphant joy of living to the fullest extent in which real meaning is found. God it’s great to be alive! Thank you. Thank you.”
  11. #35
    “If I have learned anything in this long life of mine, it is this: in love we find out who we want to be; in war we find out who we are.”
  12. #36
    “Life isn’t fair, it’s just fairer than death, that’s all.”
  1. #37
    “The life where nothing was ever unexpected. Or inconvenient. Or unusual. The life without colour, pain or past.”
  2. #38
    “Don’t be satisfied with stories, how things have gone with others. Unfold your own myth.”
  3. #39
    “But life isn’t hard to manage when you’ve nothing to lose.”
  4. #40
    “I believe that if one man were to live out his life fully and completely, were to give form to every feeling, expression to every thought, reality to every dream -- I believe that the world would gain such a fresh impulse of joy that we would forget all the maladies of mediaevalism, and return to the Hellenic ideal -- to something finer, richer than the Hellenic ideal, it may be.”
  5. #41
    “Life ... is a tale
    Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing.”
    author
    Shakespeare
    book
    Macbeth
    concept
    Life
  6. #42
    “Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.”
  7. #43
    “Things change. And friends leave. Life doesn’t stop for anybody.”
  8. #44
    “You cannot, sir, take from me any thing that I will more willingly part withal: except my life, except my life, except my life.”
    author
    Shakespeare
    book
    Hamlet
    concept
    Life
  9. #45
    “Life... is a paradise to what we fear of death.”
  10. #46
    “The lesson being that in life you control what you can.”
  11. #47
    “Life seems but a quick succession of busy nothings.”
  12. #48
    “Much of our work now is more a matter of “rehumanizing.” That starts in the same place dehumanizing starts--with words and images...We must never tolerate dehumanization--the primary instrument of violence that has been used in every genocide recorded throughout history. When we engage in dehumanizing rhetoric or promote dehumanizing images, we diminish our own humanity in the process...[it] says volumes about who we are and the degree to which we’re operating in our integrity.”
  1. #49
    “Life is much more successfully looked at from a single window.”
  2. #50
    “Every human life is worth the same, and worth saving.”
  3. #51
    “After all, what’s a life, anyway? We’re born, we live a little while, we die.”
    author
    E.B. White
    book
    Charlotte's Web
    character
    Charlotte
    concept
    Life
  4. #52
    “I know it is wet and the sun is not sunny, but we can have lots of good fun that is funny.”
  5. #53
    “The wide world is all about you: you can fence yourselves in, but you cannot forever fence it out.”
  6. #54
    “Where there’s life there’s hope.”
    author
    Tolkien
    book
    The Hobbit
    concept
    Life
  7. #55
    “May the wind under your wings bear you where the sun sails and the moon walks.”
    author
    Tolkien
    book
    The Hobbit
    character
    Gandalf
    concept
    Life
  8. #56
    “Life is worth living as long as there’s a laugh in it.”
  9. #57
    “Life’s under no obligation to give us what we expect. We take what we get and are thankful it’s no worse than it is.”
  10. #58
    “Every great musician, every great artist received a visit from the Angel at least once in his life.”
  11. #59
    “He don’t want to die. He wants to keep on living even though he’s so old and there’s nothing to be happy about anymore.”
  12. #60
    Don’t be overwise; fling yourself straight into life, without deliberation; don’t be afraid - the flood will bear you to the bank and set you safe on your feet again.
  1. #61
    “I love Twinkies, and the reason I am saying that is because we are all supposed to think of reasons to live.”
  2. #62
    “Beauty, youth, good fortune, even love itself, cannot keep care and pain, loss and sorrow, from the most blessed for...into each life some rain must fall, some days must be dark and sad and dreary.”
  3. #63
    “To be, or not to be: that is the question:
    Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
    Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
    And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
    No more; and by a sleep to say we end
    The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
    That flesh is heir to, ‘tis a consummation
    Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep;
    To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub;
    For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
    When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
    Must give us pause: there’s the respect
    That makes calamity of so long life;
    For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
    The oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
    The pangs of despised love, the law’s delay,
    The insolence of office and the spurns
    That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
    When he himself might his quietus make
    With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
    To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
    But that the dread of something after death,
    The undiscover’d country from whose bourn
    No traveller returns, puzzles the will
    And makes us rather bear those ills we have
    Than fly to others that we know not of?
    Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
    And thus the native hue of resolution
    Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought,
    And enterprises of great pith and moment
    With this regard their currents turn awry,
    And lose the name of action.--Soft you now!
    The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
    Be all my sins remember’d!”
    author
    Shakespeare
    book
    Hamlet
    concepts
    LifeDeath
  4. #64
    “There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.”
    author
    Tolkien
    book
    The Hobbit
    character
    Thorin
    concept
    Life
  5. #65
    “This goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory, this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o’erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours. What a piece of work is a man! how noble in reason! how infinite in faculty! in form and moving how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals! And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust?”
  6. #66
    “All I kept thinking about, over and over, was ‘You can’t live forever; you can’t live forever.”
  7. #67
    “A book is just like life and anything can change.”
  8. #68
    “All’s well that ends better.”
  9. #69
    “Why else do any of this if not to become who we want to be?”
  10. #70
    “Oh, it’s delightful to have ambitions. I’m so glad I have such a lot. And there never seems to be any end to them-- that’s the best of it. Just as soon as you attain to one ambition you see another one glittering higher up still. It does make life so interesting.”
  11. #71
    “How could you live each day knowing that you were simply whiling away the days until your own death?”
  12. #72
    “Who is it who decides that one man should live and another should die? My life wasn’t worth any more than his, but he’s the one who’s buried, while I get to enjoy at least a few more hours above the ground. Is it chance, random and cruel, or is there some purpose or pattern to all this, even if it lies beyond our ken?”
  1. #73
    “You only get one life. It’s actually your duty to live it as fully as possible.”
  2. #74
    “They haven’t an idea of what happiness is; they don’t know that without our love, for us there is neither happiness nor unhappiness--no life at all.”
  3. #75
    “Putting black cloths on the hives is for us. I do it to remind us that life gives way into death, and then death turns around and gives way into life.”
  4. #76
    “Someone who thinks death is the scariest thing doesn’t know a thing about life.”
  5. #77
    “Life is made of so many partings welded together.”
  6. #78
    “You see, though we travel together, we travel alone.”
  7. #79
    “I am not your justification for existence.”
  8. #80
    “The world isn’t just the way it is. It is how we understand it, no? And in understanding something, we bring something to it, no? Doesn’t that make life a story?”
  9. #81
    “Earth is crammed with Heaven.”
  10. #82
    “Of course they needed to care. It was the meaning of everything.”
  11. #83
    “For how imperiously, how coolly, in disregard of all one’s feelings, does the hard, cold, uninteresting course of daily realities move on! Still we must eat, and drink, and sleep, and wake again, - still bargain, buy, sell, ask and answer questions, - pursue, in short, a thousand shadows, though all interest in them be over; the cold, mechanical habit of living remaining, after all vital interest in it has fled.”
  12. #84
    It is nothing to die. It is frightful not to live.
  1. #85
    “All that glisters is not gold;
    Often have you heard that told:
    Many a man his life hath sold
    But my outside to behold:
    Gilded tombs do worms enfold.”
  2. #86
    Every man desires to live long, but no man wishes to be old.
  3. #87
    “To be alive──is Power.”
  4. #88
    “I swear by my life and my love of it that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine.”
  5. #89
    Breathe, hope
  6. #90
    “One should absorb the colour of life, but one should never remember its details. Details are always vulgar.”
  7. #91
    “It’s impossible to go through life unscathed. Nor should you want to. By the hurts we accumulate, we measure both our follies and our accomplishments.”
  8. #92
    “It has been,” I told him, “the best six months of my entire life.”
    There was a long silence.
    “Funnily enough, Clark, mine too.”
    And then, just like that, my heart broke. My face crumpled, my composure went and I held him tightly and I stopped caring that he could feel the shudder of my sobbing body because grief swamped me. It overwhelmed me and tore at my heart and my stomach and my head and it pulled me under, and I couldn’t bear it.
  9. #93
    “I’d like to go by climbing a birch tree,
    And climb black branches up a snow-white trunk
    Toward heaven, till the tree could bear no more,
    But dipped its top and set me down again.
    That would be good both going and coming back.
    One could do worse than be a swinger of birches.”
  10. #94
    “Ah, when to the heart of man
    Was it ever less than a treason
    To go with the drift of things,
    To yield with a grace to reason,
    And bow and accept the end
    Of a love or a season?”
  11. #95
    Pain and suffering are always inevitable for a large intelligence and a deep heart. The really great men must, I think, have great sadness on earth.
  12. #96
    “That’s what I love about Aibileen, she can take the most complicated things in life and wrap them up so small and simple, they’ll fit right in your pocket.”
  1. #97
    “I had some terrific experiences in the wilderness since I wrote you last - overpowering, overwhelming,” he gushed to his friend Cornel Tengel. “But since then I am always being overwhelmed. I require it to sustain life.”
  2. #98
    “One thing I can tell you for sure is this: we only regret what we don’t do in life.”
    author
    Kristin Hannah
    book
    Firefly Lane
    character
    Kate
    concepts
    LifeRegret
  3. #99
    “Live in the present, make the most of it, it’s all you’ve got.”
  4. #100
    “George said wonderingly, ‘S’pose they was a carnival or a circus come to town, or a ball game, . . . We’d just go to her . . . We wouldn’t ask nobody if we could. Jus’ say, ‘We’ll go to her,’ an’ we would. Jus’ milk the cow and sling some grain to the chickens an’ go to her.‘”
  5. #101
    “Just live well. Just live.”
  6. #102
    “I don’t live in either my past or my future. I’m interested only in the present. If you can concentrate always on the present, you’ll be a happy man. Life will be a party for you, a grand festival, because life is the moment we’re living now.”
  7. #103
    “Life on a lifeboat isn’t much of a life. It is like an end game in chess, a game with few pieces. The elements couldn’t be more simple, nor the stakes higher.”
  8. #104
    “No man knows till he experiences it, what it is like to feel his own life-blood drawn away into the woman he loves.”
  9. #105
    “Something in me did not want to give up on life, was unwilling to let go, wanted to fight to the very end. Where that part of me got the heart, I don’t know.”
  10. #106
    “To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
    Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
    To the last syllable of recorded time;
    And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
    The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
    Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player,
    That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
    And then is heard no more. It is a tale
    Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing.”
  11. #107
    “They were satisfied with their lives which had none of the vibrance his own was taking on. And he was angry at himself, that he could not change that for them.”
  12. #108
    “It was a star,” Mrs. Whatsit said sadly. “A star giving up its life in battle with the Thing. It won, oh, yes, my children, it won. But it lost its life in the winning.”
  13. #109
    “Ah! realize your youth while you have it. Don’t squander the gold of your days, listening to the tedious, trying to improve the hopeless failure, or giving away your life to the ignorant, the common, and the vulgar. These are the sickly aims, the false ideals, of our age. Live! Live the wonderful life that is in you! Let nothing be lost upon you. Be always searching for new sensations. Be afraid of nothing. . . . A new Hedonism -- that is what our century wants. You might be its visible symbol.”
  14. #110
    “In his face, I see the whole of my life. I see a baby who came to me long after I’d given up … and a hint of the beauty I once had. I see … my life in his eyes.”
  15. #111
    ″‘Covering the hives was supposed to keep the bees from leaving. You see, the last thing they wanted was their bees swarming off when a death took place. Having bees around was supposed to ensure that the dead person would live again.’
    “My eyes grew wide, “Really?′
    ”‘Tell her about Aristaeus,’ Zach said.
    ”‘Oh, yes, Aristaeus. Every beekeeper should know that story . . . Aristaeus was the first keeper of bees. One day all his bees died, punishment by the gods for something bad that Aristaeus had done. The gods told him to sacrifice a bull to show he was sorry, and then return to the carcass in nine days and look inside it. Well, Aristaeus did just what they said, and when he came back, he saw a swarm of bees fly out of the dead bull. His own bees, reborn. He took them home to his hives, and after that people believed that bees had power over death. The kings in Greece made their tombs in the shape of beehives for that very reason.‘”
  16. #112
    ″[Y]ou must strive to be calm, even if a hundred ravening enemies are snapping at your heels. Empty your mind and allow it to become like a tranquil pool that reflects everything around it and yet remains untouched by its surroundings. Understanding will come to you in that emptiness, when you are free of irrational fears about victory and defeat, life and death.”
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