concept

suffering Quotes

100+ of the best book quotes about suffering
  1. #1
    “The paradox of vengefulness is that it makes men dependent upon those who have harmed them, believing that their release from pain will come only when their tormentors suffer.”
  2. #2
    “Dignity is as essential to human life as water, food, and oxygen. The stubborn retention of it, even in the face of extreme physical hardship, can hold a man’s soul in his body long past the point at which the body should have surrendered it.”
  3. #3
    “When he thought of his history, what resonated with him now was not all that he had suffered but the divine love that he believed had intervened to save him.”
  4. #4
    “The broken heart. You think you will die, but you just keep living, day after day after terrible day.
  5. #5
    You got rid of them. Yes, that’s just like you. Getting rid of everything unpleasant instead of learning to put up with it. Whether ‘tis better in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows or outrageous fortune, or to take arms against a sea of troubles and by opposing end them...But you don’t do either. Neither suffer nor oppose. You just abolish the slings and arrows. It’s too easy.
  6. #6
    “The years that are gone seem like dreams—if one might go on sleeping and dreaming—but to wake up and find—oh! well! Perhaps it is better to wake up after all, even to suffer, rather than to remain a dupe to illusions all one’s life.”
  7. #7
    “Without suffering, there’d be no compassion.”
  8. #8
    “No there’s no way not to suffer. But you try all kinds of ways to keep from drowning in it, to keep on top of it, and to make it seem—well, like, you. Like you did something, all right, and now you’re suffering for it.”
  9. #9
    “I saw clearly that so long as I was still a human being and not nothingness, I was alive and so could suffer, be angry and feel shame at my actions.”
  10. #10
    “Is there suffering upon this new earth? On our earth we can only love with suffering and through suffering. We cannot love otherwise, and we know of no other sort of love.”
  11. #11
    “That which came together will fall apart imperceptibly slowly, and I will forget, but she will forgive my forgetting, just as I forgive her for forgetting me and the Colonel and everyone but herself and her mom in those last moments she spent as a person.”
  12. #12
    “The Colonel was screaming. He would inhale, and then scream. Inhale. Scream. Inhale. Scream.
    I thought, at first, that it was only yelling. But after a few breaths, I noticed a rhythm. And after a few more, I realized that the Colonel was saying words. He was screaming, “I’m so sorry.”
  13. #13
    “The Buddha said that suffering was caused by desire, we’d learned, and that the cessation of desire meant the cessation of suffering. When you stopped wishing things wouldn’t fall apart, you’d stop suffering when they did. ”
  14. #14
    “Beauty, youth, good fortune, even love itself, cannot keep care and pain, loss and sorrow, from the most blessed for...into each life some rain must fall, some days must be dark and sad and dreary.”
  15. #15
    “For with eyes made clear by many tears, and a heart softened by the tenderest sorrow, she recognized the beauty of her sister’s life--uneventful, unambitious, yet full of the genuine virtues which ‘smell sweet, and blossom in the dust’, the self-forgetfulness that makes the humblest on earth remembered soonest in heaven, the true success which is possible to all. ”
  16. #16
    “O, I have suffered
    With those that I saw suffer.”
  17. #17
    “Mariam lay on the couch, hands tucked between her knees, watched the whirlpool of snow twisting and spinning outside the window. She remembered Nana saying once that each snowflake was a sigh heaved by an aggrieved woman somewhere in the world. That all the sighs drifted up the sky, gathered into clouds, then broke into tiny pieces that fell silently on the people below.
    *As a reminder of how people like us suffer,* she’d said. *How quietly we endure all that falls upon us.*”
  18. #18
    “They became acquainted with sorrow and loved sorrow; they thirsted for suffering, and said that truth could only be attained through suffering. Then science appeared. As they became wicked they began talking of brotherhood and humanitarianism, and understood those ideas. As they became criminal, they invented justice and drew up whole legal codes in order to observe it, and to ensure their being kept, set up a guillotine. They hardly remembered what they had lost, in fact refused to believe that they had ever been happy and innocent.”
  19. #19
    “I do not believe that sheer suffering teaches. If suffering alone taught, all the world would be wise, since everyone suffers. To suffering must be added mourning, understanding, patience, love, openness, and the willingness to remain vulnerable.”
  20. #20
    “But I hope you will heed this: A man who has no conscience, no goodness, does not suffer.”
  21. #21
    “Suffering means being cut off from God. Therefore those who live in communion with him cannot really suffer.”
  22. #22
    “I never did learn anything out of my past life, now I have to suffer again.”
  23. #23
    “An experience of collective pain does not deliver us from grief or sadness; it is a ministry of presence. These moments remind us that we are not alone in our darkness and that our broken heart is connected to every heart that has known pain since the beginning of time.”
  24. #24
    “We have two lives, Roy, the life we learn with and the life we live with after that. Suffering is what brings us toward happiness.”
  25. #25
    “If, as a culture, we don’t bear witness to grief, the burden of loss is placed entirely upon the bereaved, while the rest of us avert our eyes and wait for those in mourning to stop being sad, to let go, to move on, to cheer up. And if they don’t — if they have loved too deeply, if they do wake each morning thinking, I cannot continue to live — well, then we pathologize their pain; we call their suffering a disease.
    We do not help them: we tell them that they need to get help.”
  1. #26
    “The more we diminish our own pain, or rank it compared to what others have survived, the less empathetic we are to everyone.”
  2. #27
    “The particularity of our problems can be made bearable only through the recognition of our universal humanity. We suffer uniquely, but we survive the same way.”
  3. #28
    “One writes of scars healed, a loose parallel to the pathology of the skin, but there is no such thing in the life of an individual. There are open wounds, shrunk sometimes to the size of a pin-prick but wounds still. The marks of suffering are more comparable to the loss of a finger, or of the sight of an eye. We may not miss them, either, for one minute in a year, but if we should there is nothing to be done about it.”
  4. #29
    “When you’re older you’ll know what people who love suffer. The agony. It’s better to be cold and young than to love.”
  5. #30
    “Why joys so scantily disburse,
    Why Paradise defer,
    Why floods are served to us in bowls,—
    I speculate no more.”
  6. #31
    “I am not used to Hope —
    It might intrude upon —
    Its sweet parade — blaspheme the place —
    Ordained to Suffering —”
  7. #32
    “For each ecstatic instant
    We must an anguish pay
    In keen and quivering ratio
    To the ecstasy.”
  8. #33
    “It seems that most people need to experience a great deal of suffering before they will relinquish resistance and accept - before they will forgive.”
  9. #34
    “You got to take the crookeds with the straights. That’s what Papa used to say.”
  10. #35
    “I, the miserable and the abandoned, am an abortion, to be spurned at, and kicked, and trampled on.”
  11. #36
    “I am malicious because I am miserable. Am I not shunned and hated by all mankind?”
  12. #37
    “As I fixed my eyes on the child, I saw something glittering on his breast. I took it; it was a portrait of a most lovely woman. In spite of my malignity, it softened and attracted me. For a few moments I gazed with delight on her dark eyes, fringed by deep lashes, and her lovely lips; but presently my rage returned; I remembered that I was forever deprived of the delights that such beautiful creatures could bestow and that she whose resemblance I contemplated would, in regarding me, have changed that air of divine benignity to one expressive of disgust and affright.”
  13. #38
    “If I had read all this in a book, Harry, I think I would have wept over it. Somehow, now that it has happened actually, and to me, it seems far too wonderful for tears.”
  14. #39
    “Without the frown of clouds and lightning, the vines would be burned by the smiling sun.”
  15. #40
    “It was like breakers upon a beach; there was new water, but the wave looked just the same. He strolled about and talked with them, and the biggest of them told tales of their prowess, while those who were weaker, or younger and inexperienced, gathered round and listened in admiring silence. The last time he was there, Jurgis had thought of little but his family; but now he was free to listen to these men, and to realize that he was one of them—that their point of view was his point of view, and that the way they kept themselves alive in the world was the way he meant to do it in the future.”
  16. #41
    “Call’s gone to round up a dern bunch of cowboys so we can head out for Montana with a dern bunch of cows and suffer for the rest of our lives.”
  17. #42
    “Tell your heart that the fear of suffering is worse than the suffering itself. And that no heart has ever suffered when it goes in search of its dreams, because every second of the search is a second’s encounter with God and with eternity.”
  18. #43
    “Was I sleeping, while the others suffered? Am I sleeping now? Tomorrow, when I wake, or think I do, what shall I say of today?”
  19. #44
    “There is a secret medicine given only to those who hurt so hard they can’t hope.”
  20. #45
    ″[Jurgis] could not hear it often enough; he could not ask with enough variations. Yes, they had bought the house, they had really bought it. It belonged to them, they had only to pay the money and it would be all right. Then Jurgis covered his face with his hands, for there were tears in his eyes, and he felt like a fool. But he had had such a horrible fright; strong man as he was, it left him almost too weak to stand up.”
  21. #46
    “Augustus nodded at the screen. ‘Pain demands to be felt,’ he said, which was a line from An Imperial Affliction.”
  22. #47
    “Everyone was so kind. Strong, too. In the darkest days, the Lord puts the best people into your life.”
  23. #48
    ″ Like patience, passion comes from the same Latin root: pati. It does not mean to flow with exuberance. It means to suffer.”
  24. #49
    “Jurgis had first come to the stockyards he had been as clean as any workingman could well be. But later on, what with sickness and cold and hunger and discouragement, and the filthiness of his work, and the vermin in his home, he had given up washing in winter, and in summer only as much of him as would go into a basin. He had had a shower bath in jail, but nothing since—and now he would have a swim!”
  25. #50
    ″‘How could any Lord have made this world?’ she asked. With her mind she had always seized the fact that there is no reason, order, justice: but suffering, death, the poor. There was no treachery too base for the world to commit; she knew that. No happiness lasted; she knew that.”

Books about courage

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Off & Away book
Picture book
6.1
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I Am So Brave! book
Board book
6.0
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Tomorrow I'll Be Brave book
Picture book
6.0
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The Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles book
Chapter book
5.9
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Jabari Jumps book
Picture book
5.8
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What Do You Do with a Chance book
Picture book
5.8
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Big Papa and the Time Machine book
Picture book
5.8
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My Brave Year of Firsts book
Picture book
5.8
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  1. #51
    “There was no pain in their eyes and no knowledge of the agony of their body. There was only joy in them, and pride, a pride holier than it is fit for human pride to be.”
  2. #52
    “Suffering in search of truth gives true meaning to the truth.”
  3. #53
    “It takes ten times as long to put yourself back together as it does to fall apart.”
  4. #54
    Man cannot possess anything as long as he fears death. But to him who does not fear it, everything belongs. If there was no suffering, man would not know his limits, would not know himself.
  5. #55
    “We should put life in our faith. We should give ourselves utterly to God in pure abandonment, in temporal and spiritual matters alike, and find contentment in the doing of His will, whether he takes us through sufferings or consolations.”
  6. #56
    “Mindfulness is the best way to be with our suffering without being overwhelmed by it. Mindfulness is the capacity to dwell in the present moment, to know what’s happening in the here and now.”
  7. #57
    “I did not pray for any relief, but I prayed for strength to suffer with courage, humility and love.”
  8. #58
    “Where there is suffering, there is happiness.”
  9. #59
    “Without suffering, there’s no happiness. So we shouldn’t discriminate against the mud. We have to learn how to embrace and cradle our own suffering and the suffering of the world, with a lot of tenderness.”
  10. #60
    “I am taught by suffering to endure.”
  11. #61
    “The particularity of our problems can be made bearable only through the recognition of our universal humanity. We suffer uniquely, but we survive the same way.”
  12. #62
    “When you first hear that suffering is a Noble Truth, you might wonder what’s so noble about suffering? The Buddha was saying that if we can recognize suffering, and if we embrace it and look deeply into its roots, then we’ll be able to let go of the habits that feed it and at the same time, find a way to happiness. Suffering has its beneficial aspects. It can be a an excellent teacher.”
  13. #63
    “Keep in mind that many people have died for their beliefs; it’s actually quite common. The real courage is in living and suffering for what you believe.”
  14. #64
    “A blight is on our harvest in the ear, A blight upon the grazing flocks and herds, A blight on wives in travail; and withal Armed with his blazing torch the God of Plague Hath swooped upon our city emptying The house of Cadmus, and the murky realm Of Pluto is full fed with groans and tears.”
  15. #65
    “We ruminate on suffering, regret, and sorrow. We chew on them, swallow them, bring them back up, and eat them again and again. If we’re feeding our suffering while we’re walking, working, eating, or talking, we are making ourselves victims of the ghosts of the past, of the future, or our worries in the present. We’re not living our lives.”
  16. #66
    “Let us occupy ourselves entirely in knowing God. The more we know Him, the more we will desire to know Him. As love increases with knowledge, the more we know God, the more we will truly love Him. We will learn to love Him equally in times of distress or in times of great joy.”
  17. #67
    “He does not ask much of us, merely a thought of Him from time to time, a little act of adoration, sometimes to ask for His grace, sometimes to offer Him your sufferings, at other times to thank Him for the graces, past and present, He has bestowed on you, in the midst of your troubles to take solace in Him as often as you can.”
  18. #68
    “Wretch, may he pine in utter wretchedness!”
  19. #69
    If there was no suffering, man would not know his limits, would not know himself.
  20. #70
    “This your island, which seemed as to this particular the happiest in the world, will suffer much by the cursed avarice of a few persons.”
  21. #71
    “All throughout Scripture and history, the principal suffering of the poor is not that they can’t pay their rent on time or that they are three dollars short of a package of Pampers . . . The principal suffering of the poor is shame and disgrace.”
  22. #72
    ″ All my life’s been full of hard trouble. If I wasn’t hungry, I was sick. And if I wasn’t sick, I was in trouble. I ain’t never bothered nobody. I just worked hard every day as long as I can remember. ... And now I’m in this. They looking for me and when they catch me they’ll kill me. ”
  23. #73
    “I think that he would rather suffer anything than entertain these false notions and live in this miserable manner.”
  24. #74
    “Look! Her wedding ring slipped – she had grown so thin. It was she who suffered – but she had nobody to tell.”
  25. #75
    “One cannot bring children into a world like this. One cannot perpetuate suffering, or increase the breed of these lustful animals, who have no lasting emotions, but only whims and vanities, eddying them now this way, now that.”
  1. #76
    “What does it mean to have to suffer so much if our lives are nothing more than the blink of an eye? … I learned a long time ago, Reuven, that a blink of an eye in itself is nothing. But the eye that blinks, that is something.”
  2. #77
    “[My father] taught me with silence. . .to look into myself, to find my own strength, to walk around inside myself in company with my soul. . . . One learns of the pain of others by suffering one’s own pain … by turning inside oneself. . . . It makes us aware of how frail and tiny we are and of how much we must depend upon the Master of the Universe.”
  3. #78
    “I...have a woman in my arms who has suffered greatly and desperately needs to believe once again that she is beautiful.”
  4. #79
    “I have no ... authority to be speaking up like a seer ... We’ve had enough seers in this family. ”
  5. #80
    “He suffered ever the same unceasing agonies and in his loneliness pondered always on the same insoluble question: ‘What is this? Can it be that it is Death?’ And the inner voice answered: ‘Yes, it is Death.‘”
  6. #81
    ″ ‘Conor O’Malley,’ he said, his voice growing poisonous now. ‘Who everyone’s sorry for because of his mum. Who swans around school acting like he’s so different, like no one knows his suffering.’ ”
  7. #82
    “Though good and bad men suffer alike, we must not suppose that there is no difference between the men themselves.”
  8. #83
    “Our friend Tom, in his own simple musings, often compared his more fortunate lot, in the bondage into which he was cast, with that of Joseph in Egypt; and, in fact, as time went on, and he developed more and more under the eye of his master, the strength of the parallel increased.”
  9. #84
    “For even in the likeness of the sufferings, there remains an unlikeness in the sufferers; and though exposed to the same anguish, virtue and vice are not the same thing.”
  10. #85
    “But now George has TB and they tell me he may even die... Which adds to that darkness in my mind, all these DEATH things piling up suddenly -- But I cant believe old Zen Master George is going to allow his body to die.”
  11. #86
    “But a mermaid has no tears, and therefore she suffers so much more.”
  12. #87
    “Sully suffers from a stutter,
    simple syllables will clutter,
    stalling speeches up on beaches
    like a sunken sailboat rudder.”
  13. #88
    “We call them dumb animals, and so they are, for they cannot tell us how they feel, but they do not suffer less because they have no words.”
  14. #89
    “It occurred to me that the Catholics had done this to her—whatever it was, it surely qualified for the unmentioned UNSPEAKABLE OUTRAGE that Owen claimed his father and mother had suffered. There was something about Mrs. Meany’s obdurate self-imprisonment that smacked of religious persecution—if not eternal damnation.”
  15. #90
    “Harry, suffering like this proves you are still a man! This pain is part of being human … the fact that you can feel pain like this is your greatest strength.”
  16. #91
    “Of all the world’s errors, he seemed to feel, the most fundamental was the ‘erasing’ of people, the ‘hiding away’ of suffering.’”
  17. #92
    “Many people suffer because of the false supposition on which they have based their lives. That supposition is that there should be no fear or loneliness, no confusion or doubt. But these sufferings can only be dealt with creatively when they are understood as wounds integral to our human condition. ”
  18. #93
    “Perhaps the main task of the minister is to prevent people from suffering for the wrong reasons.”
  19. #94
    “White Fang had ceased eating, lost heart, and allowed every dog of the team to thrash him.”
  20. #95
    And the more I drink the more I feel it. That’s why I drink too. I try to find sympathy and feeling in drink.... I drink so that I may suffer twice as much!
  21. #96
    “Out of suffering have emerged the strongest souls; the most massive characters are seared with scars.”
  22. #97
    “How will I teach this mind what it is to have a soul? How will I teach this mind to understand pain? How will I teach it to want to take on another person’s suffering?”
  23. #98
    “Being alive and being a woman is all I got but being colored is a metaphysical dilemma I haven’t conquered yet”
  24. #99
    “Justice is not Healing. Healing cometh only by suffering and patience, and maketh no demand, not even for Justice.”
  25. #100
    “Me miserable! which way shall I flie
    Infinite wrauth, and infinite despaire?
    Which way I flie is Hell; my self am Hell;
    And in the lowest deep a lower deep
    Still threatning to devour me opens wide,
    To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heav’n.”

Books about grief

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Grandpa's Top Threes book
Picture book
6.4
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Ida, Always book
Picture book
6.0
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A Stopwatch from Grampa book
Picture book
5.3
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Where Lily Isn't book
Picture book
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Something Very Sad Happened book
Picture book
5.0
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The Rough Patch book
Picture book
5.0
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Dance Like a Leaf book
Picture book
4.8
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The Goodbye Book book
Picture book
4.8
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  1. #101
    “What dost thou know of suffering and oppression? I and my people know, but not thou.”
  2. #102
    “There’s no good way to lose a loved one—just, in the words of one twenty-six-year-old woman, ‘different kinds of hell.’ ”
  3. #103
    Human suffering anywhere concerns men and women everywhere.
  4. #104
    They are committing the greatest indignity human beings can inflict on one another: telling people who have suffered excruciating pain and loss that their pain and loss were illusions.
  5. #105
    There’s a long road of suffering ahead of you. But don’t lose courage.
  6. #106
    “Time makes us sentimental. Perhaps, in the end, it is because of time that we suffer.”
  7. #107
    “We rip out so much of ourselves to be cured of things faster than we should that we go bankrupt by the age of thirty and have less to offer each time we start with someone new. But to feel nothing so as not to feel anything—what a waste!”
  8. #108
    “The answer is that there is no good answer. So as parents, as doctors, as judges, and as a society, we fumble through and make decisions that allow us to sleep at night—because morals are more important than ethics, and love is more important than law.‘”
  9. #109
    “She is dying Sara. She will die, either tonight or tomorrow or maybe a year from now if we’re really lucky. You heard what Dr. Chance said. Arsenic’s not a cure. It just postpones what’s coming.’
    My eyes fill with tears. ‘But I love her,’ I say, because that is reason enough.”
  10. #110
    “The hard work of sowing seed in what looks like perfectly empty earth has, as every farmer knows, a time of harvest. All suffering, all pain, all emptiness, all disappointment is seed: sow it in God and he will, finally, bring a crop of joy from it.”
  11. #111
    “In short: ‘Who can take away suffering without entering it?’ ”
  12. #112
    “Jesus’ suffering and death brought joy and life. His humiliation brought glory; his rejection brought a community of love.”
  13. #113
    “Of course Anna should be honored for donating her bone marrow. Of course she deserves recognition. But the thought of rewarding someone for their suffering, frankly, never entered my mind.”
  14. #114
    “Either this girl loses her sister, I think, or she’s going to lose herself.”
  15. #115
    “Foolish woman. Don’t you realize this is just the beginning? We have the chance now to die with dignity.”
  16. #116
    “Cath could already feel the anxiety starting to tear her stomach into nervous little pieces. ‘It’s not just that…. I don’t like new places. New situations. There’ll be all those people, and I won’t know where to sit—I don’t want to go.’”
  17. #117
    “Only a third of PTSD sufferers receive treatment because it is tough to diagnose and a challenge to treat, a situation further complicated by the fact that sufferers are often hard to reach.”
  18. #118
    “To see a wretched criminal squirming in the dock, suffering the tortures of the damned… was to me an exquisite pleasure. Mind you, I took no pleasure in seeing an innocent man there.”
  19. #119
    “There were, I considered, amongst my guests, varying degrees of guilt. Those whose guilt was the lightest should, I considered, pass out first, and not suffer the prolonged mental strain and fear that the more cold-blooded offenders were to suffer.”
  20. #120
    “Child, when do you think is the time to love somebody the most? When they done good and made things easy for everybody? Well then, you ain’t through learning – because that ain’t the time at all. It’s when he’s at his lowest and can’t believe in hisself ‘cause the world done whipped him so! When you starts measuring somebody, measure him right, child, measure him right. Make sure you done taken into account what hills and valleys he come through before he got to wherever he is.”
  21. #121
    “I have wanted . . . to commit a murder myself. I recognized this as the desire of the artist to express himself! . . . But—incongruous as it may seem to some—I was restrained and hampered by my innate sense of justice. The innocent must not suffer.”
  22. #122
    Aren’t all these notes the senseless writings of a man who won’t accept the fact that there is nothing we can do with suffering except to suffer it?
  23. #123
    “So that your punishment will indeed be infinite. Oh, who can express what the state of a soul in such circumstances is! ”
  24. #124
    “We feel friendly towards those whom we help to secure good for themselves, provided we are not likely to suffer heavily by it ourselves.”
  25. #125
    Feel your suffering, rest with it, embrace it, make love with it. Feel your suffering so deeply and thoroughly that you penetrate it, and realize its fearful foundation.
  1. #126
    “The evil-doer mourns in this world, and he mourns in the next; he mourns in both. He mourns and suffers when he sees the evil of his own work.”
  2. #127
    “The attempt to avoid legitimate suffering lies at the root of all emotional illness.”
  3. #128
    “When we avoid the legitimate suffering that results from dealing with problems, we also avoid the growth that problems demand from us. It is for this reason that in chronic mental illness we stop growing, we become stuck. And without healing, the human spirit begins to shrivel.”
  4. #129
    “That long-ago day, sitting in this very spot on the dock, she had already begun to feel it: how hard it would be to inherit their parents’ dreams. How suffocating to be so loved. She had felt Nath’s hands on her shoulders and been almost grateful to fall forward, to let herself sink… Don’t let me sink, she had thought as she reached for his hand, and he had promised not to when he took it. This moment, Lydia thought. This is where it all went wrong.”
  5. #130
    “Man can preserve a vestige of spiritual freedom, of independence of mind, even in . . . terrible conditions of psychic and physical stress.”
  6. #131
    “There is only one thing that I dread: not to be worthy of my sufferings.”
  7. #132
    “Nobody will protect you from your suffering. You can’t cry it away or eat it away or starve it away or walk it away or punch it away or even therapy it away. It’s just there, and you have to survive it. You have to endure it.”
  8. #133
    “The problem of reconciling human suffering with the existence of a God who loves, is only insoluble so long as we attach a trivial meaning to the word “love”, and look on things as if man were the centre of them.”
  9. #134
    “yet all this while I liv’d uncomfortably, by reason of the constant Apprehensions I was in of their coming up on me by Surprize; from whence I observe, that the Expectation of Evil is more bitter than the Suffering, especially if there is no room to shake off that Expectation, or Apprehensions.”
  10. #135
    “John is away all day, and even some nights when his cases are serious. I am glad my case is not serious! But these nervous troubles are dreadfully depressing. John does not know how much I really suffer. He knows there is no reason to suffer, and that satisfies him.”
  11. #136
    “Our past may explain why we’re suffering but we must not use it as an excuse to stay in bondage.”
  12. #137
    “Even when I bore the pain of my search valiantly, in silence, the mute sufferings of my soul were loud voices calling to your mercy. You knew what I endured, but no man knew.”
  13. #138
    “Suffering has been stronger than all other teaching, and has taught me to understand what your heart used to be. I have been bent and broken, but - I hope - into a better shape.”
  14. #139
    “And O there are days in this life, worth life and worth death.”
  15. #140
    “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.”
  16. #141
    “I have learned now that while those who speak about one’s miseries usually hurt, those who keep silence hurt more.”
  17. #142
    “Sometimes I think God is trying to test me, both now and in the future. I’ll have to become a good person on my own, without anyone to serve as a model or advise me, but it’ll make me stronger in the end.”
  18. #143
    They were eyes no longer, but had become those fathomless mirrors which in men who have known the depths of suffering may replace the conscious gaze, so that they no longer see reality but reflect the memory of past events.
  19. #144
    “Without pain, how could we know joy?′ This is an old argument in the field of thinking about suffering and its stupidity and lack of sophistication could be plumbed for centuries but suffice it to say that the existence of broccoli does not, in any way, affect the taste of chocolate.”
  20. #145
    “I hated hurting him. Most of the time, I could forget about it, but the inexorable truth is this: They might be glad to have me around, but I was the alpha and the omega of my parents’ suffering.”
  21. #146
    “Let me take a moment to tell those of you who are dealing with and fighting through something painful: it is a miracle that you’re sitting here. You are nobly doing your best to battle your way through it. You are a warrior because of the trials you are going through, but don’t you dare squander the strength you have earned just because the acquisition of it was painful.”
  22. #147
    “Her hazel eyes seemed to have experienced all possible tragedy and to have mounted pain and suffering like steps into a high calm and a superhuman understanding.”
  23. #148
    “The last few hours were certainly very painful,” replied Anne: “but when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure. One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering-”
  24. #149
    “You must suffer me to go my own dark way.”
  25. #150
    “If I am the chief of sinners, I am the chief of sufferers also.”
  1. #151
    “No man knows till he has suffered from the night how sweet and dear to his heart and eye the morning can be.”
  2. #152
    “Everyone suffers, even the good Lord suffered when he was on Earth.”
  3. #153
    “Suffer love,--a good epithet! I do suffer love indeed, for I love thee against my will.”
  4. #154
    Hell is not for eternity.
  5. #155
    We are all brothers, and we are all suffering the same fate. The same smoke floats over all our heads. Help one another. It is the only way to survive.
  6. #156
    “To suffer terribly and to know yourself as the cause: that is Hell.”
  7. #157
    “It was inevitable that she should accept any inconsistency and cruelty from her deity as all good worshippers do from theirs. All gods who receive homage are cruel. All gods dispense suffering without reason. Otherwise they would not be worshipped. Through indiscriminate suffering men know fear and fear is the most divine emotion. It is the stones for altars and the beginning of wisdom. Half gods are worshipped in wine and flowers. Real gods require blood.”
  8. #158
    “When a man finds that it is his destiny to suffer, he will have to accept his suffering as his task.”
  9. #159
    “I only insist that meaning is available in spite of—nay, even through—suffering.”
  10. #160
    “I know that without the suffering, the growth that I have achieved would have been impossible.”
  11. #161
    “There was no need to be ashamed of tears, for tears bore witness that a man had the greatest of courage, the courage to suffer.”
  12. #162
    “If there is a meaning in life at all, then there must be a meaning in suffering. Suffering is an ineradicable part of life, even as fate and death. Without suffering and death human life cannot be complete.”
  13. #163
    “Kindness, merely as such, cares not whether its object becomes good or bad, provided only that it escapes suffering.”
  14. #164
    “And perhaps, by God’s grace, I succeed, and for a day or two become a creature consciously dependent on God and drawing its strength from the right sources. But the moment the threat is withdrawn, my whole nature leaps back to the toys: I am even anxious, God forgive me, to banish from my mind the only thing that supported me under the threat because it is now associated with the misery of those few days. Thus the terrible necessity of tribulation is only too clear. God has had me for but forty-eight hours and then only by dint of taking everything else away from me. Let Him but sheathe that sword for a moment and I behave like a puppy when the hated bath is over—I shake myself as dry as I can and race off to reacquire my comfortable dirtiness, if not in the nearest manure heap, at least in the nearest flower bed. And that is why tribulations cannot cease until God either sees us remade or sees that our remaking is now hopeless.”
  15. #165
    “I must add, too, that the only purpose of the book is to solve the intellectual problem raised by suffering; for the far higher task of teaching fortitude and patience I was never fool enough to suppose myself qualified, nor have I anything to offer my readers except my conviction that when pain is to be borne, a little courage helps more than much knowledge, a little human sympathy more than much courage, and the least tincture of the love of God more than all. ”
  16. #166
    “Try to exclude the possibility of suffering which the order of nature and the existence of free-wills involve, and you find that you have excluded life itself. ”
  17. #167
    ″Thinking that we can find some lasting pleasure and avoid pain is what in Buddhism is called samsara, a hopeless cycle that goes round and round endlessly and causes us to suffer greatly.″
  18. #168
    “Mother, when you’re disappointed, you get that awful suffering look on your face, like the picture of Jesus’ mother in the museum.”
  19. #169
    “They called it battle fatigue, and they said hallucinations were common with malarial fever.”
  20. #170
    “He could feel it inside his skull—the tension of little threads being pulled and how it was with tangled things, things tied together, and as he tried to pull them apart and rewind them into their places, they snagged and tangled even more.”
  21. #171
    “If you don’t get what you want, you suffer; if you get what you don’t want, you suffer; even when you get exactly what you want, you still suffer because you can’t hold on to it forever.”
  22. #172
    “I think Haiti is a place that suffers so much from neglect that people only want to hear about it when it’s at its extreme. And that’s what they end up knowing about it.”
  23. #173
    “Before now, and for quite some time, we maintained our decorum and suffered in silence whatever you men did, because you wouldn’t let us make a sound.”
  24. #174
    “We have mastered our surroundings, increased food production, built cities, established empires and created far-flung trade networks. But did we decrease the amount of suffering in the world?”
  25. #175
    “In order to rise from its own ashes a phoenix first must burn.”
  1. #176
    “Suffering has a noble purpose: the evolution of consciousness and the burning up of the ego.” ”
  2. #177
    “They say of some temporary suffering, ‘No future bliss can make up for it,’ not knowing that Heaven, once attained, will work backwards and turn even that agony into a glory.”
  3. #178
    “You have noticed that the truth comes into this world with two faces. One is sad with suffering, and the other laughs; but it is the same face, laughing or weeping.”
  4. #179
    “Accepting means you allow yourself to feel whatever it is you are feeling at that moment. It is part of the isness of the Now. You can’t argue with what is. Well, you can, but if you do, you suffer.”
  5. #180
    “There is recompense for suffering. A principle beyond selfishness is at work in the cosmos. All will be well. I do not know whether any of this is true. I am certain that the scientific community does not know that it is false.”
  6. #181
    “Her sorrow was extreme. She threw herself on the ground, screamed, appealed to God, and wept all alone in the fields until the sunrise. Then she returned to the farm and announced that she wanted to leave.”
  7. #182
    “Walking back past the roadside cross, Félicité decided to commend to God what she cherished the most. She stood there for a long time, looking up at the sky and praying, her face bathed in tears.”
  8. #183
    “Sadly, many of the things that undermine our joy and happiness, we create ourselves. Often it comes from the negative tendencies of the mind, emotional reactivity, or from our inability to appreciate and utilize the resources within us… We create most of our suffering, so it should be logical that we also have the ability to create more joy.”
  9. #184
    “The more time you spend thinking about yourself, the more suffering you will experience.”
  10. #185
    “When we see these things (suffering), we realize that not only do we suffer, but so do many of our human brothers and sisters. So when we look at the same event from a wider perspective, we will reduce the worrying and our own suffering.”
  11. #186
    “People suffer because they are caught in their views. As soon as we release those views, we are free and we don’t suffer anymore.”
  12. #187
    “Have compassion for all beings, rich and poor alike; each has their suffering. Some suffer too much, others too little.”
  13. #188
    “If a man speak or act with a good thought, happiness follows him like a shadow that never leaves him.”
  14. #189
    “Ambition is like love, impatient both of delays and rivals.”
  15. #190
    “Remembering a wrong is like carrying a burden on the mind.”
  16. #191
    “The seed of suffering in you may be strong, but don’t wait until you have no more suffering before allowing yourself to be happy.”
  17. #192
    “Anxiety, the illness of our time, comes primarily from our inability to dwell in the present moment.”
  18. #193
    “Mindfulness puts an end to such a limited perspective. The Buddha faced his own suffering directly and discovered the path of liberation. Don’t run away from things that are unpleasant in order to embrace things that are pleasant. Put your hands in the earth. Face the difficulties and grow new happiness.”
  19. #194
    “There is nothing so disobedient as an undisciplined mind, and there is nothing so obedient as a disciplined mind.”
  20. #195
    “Pain is certain, suffering is optional.”
  21. #196
    “The root of suffering is attachment.”
  22. #197
    “Our life is shaped by our mind; we become what we think. Suffering follows an evil thought as the wheels of a cart follow the oxen that draws it.”
  23. #198
    “The greatest miracle is to be alive. We can put an end to our suffering just by realizing that our suffering is not worth suffering for! How many people kill themselves because of rage or despair? In that moment, they do not see the vast happiness that is available.”
  24. #199
    “The secret of health for both mind and body is not to mourn for the past, nor to worry about the future, but to live the present moment wisely and earnestly.”
  25. #200
    Sutra II.15: Parinama tapa samskara duhkhaih guna vrtti virodhaccha duhkham evam sarvam vivekinah
    Translation: Change, longing, habits, and the activity of the gunas can all cause us suffering. In fact, even the wise suffer, for suffering is everywhere.
  26. #201
    “And yet she hadn’t the air of a woman whose life had been touched by uncertainty or suffering. Pain, fear, and grief were things that left their mark on people. Even love, that exquisite torturing emotion, left its subtle traces on the countenance.”
  27. #202
    “Suffering is not good for the soul, unless it teaches you how to stop suffering. That is its purpose.”
  28. #203
    “And now the rule of your life is this: Do not rejoice when you have found, do not weep when you have lost. ”
  29. #204
    “No human being can know the future. The greatest of disasters may overtake a man in the best of places, and the greatest happiness may seek him out in the worst. ”
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