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Movies And Cinema: Books For Kids

Looking for a list of the best children's books about movies and cinema?

Children’s literature has many notable options when it comes to movies and cinema. To help you find the right books for you and your young reader, we’ve compiled a list of the best kids books about movies and cinema.

Our list includes board books, picture books, and chapter books. Board books are best for babies and toddlers from ages newborn to 2 or 3. Picture books are generally great options for toddlers and for preschool and kindergarten age children. Picture books are especially enjoyable for adults to read aloud with young kids. The chapter books on our list are generally best for elementary through early middle school age tween kids. You can filter to sort by the best book type for your kid.

When it comes to children’s stories about movies and cinema, there are a variety of titles. This list covers everything, from classics like Gracie Laroo on the Big Screen to popular sellers like Double Down to some of our favorite hidden gems like Audrey Hepburn.

We hope this list of kids books about movies and cinema can be a helpful resource for parents, teachers, and others searching for a new book! As you explore the list, please comment below to let us know what books you would add.

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Audrey Hepburn
Written by Isabel Sanchez Vegara & illustrated by Amaia Arrazola
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-4

This board book version of Audrey Hepburn—an international bestseller from the beloved Little People, BIG DREAMS series—introduces the youngest dreamers to this iconic Hollywood movie star.

Audrey Hepburn grew up in Arnhem in the Netherlands. After living through the hardships of World War Two, she moved to study ballet in London. She went on to star in plays and films, eventually becoming one of the most iconic actresses of all time. Babies and toddlers will love to snuggle as you read to them the engaging story of this fascinating star, and will also enjoy exploring the stylish and quirky illustrations of this sturdy board book on their own.

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Hedy Lamarr's Double Life
Written by Laurie Wallmark & illustrated by Katy Wu
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-10

To her adoring public, Hedy Lamarr was a glamorous movie star. But in private, she was something more: a brilliant inventor. Now Laurie Wallmark and Katy Wu, who collaborated on Sterling’s critically acclaimed picture-book biography Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code, tell the inspiring story of how, during World War Two, Lamarr developed a groundbreaking communications system that still remains essential to the security of today’s technology.

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Maisy Goes to the Movies: A Maisy First Experiences Book
Written & illustrated by Lucy Cousins
picture book
Recommend Ages: 2-7

Maisy and her pals discover the magic of the big screen as they go to a movie theater for the first time. Maisy and her friends are so excited! They’re going to see a fun adventure film. With tickets and snacks at the ready, they scramble for seats and settle in for the movie to begin. Cyril’s a little afraid of the dark, but Maisy is happy to hold his hand. When Eddie enthusiastically shouts at the screen, he quickly learns a lesson in movie etiquette! After little ones share this outing with Maisy, they’ll be raring to go on their own movie-theater adventure.

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Making Their Voices Heard: The Inspiring Friendship of Ella Fitzgerald and Marilyn Monroe
Written by Vivian Kirkfield & illustrated by Alleanna Harris
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Ella Fitzgerald and Marilyn Monroe. On the outside, you couldn’t find two girls who looked more different. But on the inside, they were alike—full of hopes and dreams and plans of what might be.

Ella Fitzgerald’s velvety tones and shube-doobie-doos captivated audiences. Jazz greats like Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington couldn’t wait to share the stage with her, but still, Ella could not book a performance at one of the biggest clubs in town—one she knew would give her career its biggest break yet.

Marilyn Monroe dazzled on the silver screen with her baby blue eyes and breathy boo-boo-be-doos. But when she asked for better scripts, a choice in who she worked with, and a higher salary, studio bosses refused.

Two women whose voices weren’t being heard. Two women chasing after their dreams and each helping the other to achieve them. This is the inspiring, true story of two incredibly talented women who came together to help each other shine like the stars that they are.

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Lights! Camera! Alice!
Written by Mara Rockliff & illustrated by Simona Ciraolo
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

Meet Alice Guy-Blaché. She made movies—some of the very first movies, and some of the most exciting! Blow up a pirate ship? Why not? Crawl into a tiger’s cage? Of course! Leap off a bridge onto a real speeding train? It will be easy! Driven by her passion for storytelling, Alice saw a potential for film that others had not seen before, allowing her to develop new narratives, new camera angles, new techniques, and to surprise her audiences again and again. With daring and vision, Alice Guy-Blaché introduced the world to a thrilling frontier of imagination and adventure, and became one of filmmaking’s first and greatest innovators. Mara Rockliff tells the story of a girl who grew up loving stories and became an acclaimed storyteller and an inspiration in her own right.

Gracie Laroo on the Big Screen book
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The 78-Story Treehouse book
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Double Down book
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The Not-So-Boring Letters of Private Nobody book
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  • Gracie Laroo on the Big Screen - Gracie the pig has a part in a movie with with Tilda Swinetune, the champion swim racer and movie star, but she is upset when she realizes she is just a stunt double—however a small change in the script makes her able to do that and also fulfill her dream with a part of her own.

  • The 78-Story Treehouse - Andy and Terry live in a 78-story treehouse. (It used to be a 65-story treehouse, but they just keep building more levels!) It has a drive-thru car wash, a courtroom with a robot judge called Edward Gavelhead, a scribbletorium, a combining machine, an ALL-BALL sports stadium, a high-security potato chip storage facility, and an open-air movie theatre with a super-giant screen . . . which is a very useful thing to have now that Terry’s going to be a big-shot movie star! After Andy gets cut out of the movie, he and Terry have a big fight and decide they don’t want to be best friends anymore. But with a herd of sneaky spy cows out to steal all their story ideas, can Andy and Terry make up before it’s too late?

  • Double Down - The pressure’s really piling up on Greg Heffley. His mom thinks video games are turning his brain to mush, so she wants her son to put down the controller and explore his “creative side.” As if that’s not scary enough, Halloween’s just around the corner and the frights are coming at Greg from every angle. When Greg discovers a bag of gummy worms, it sparks an idea. Can he get his mom off his back by making a movie . . . and will he become rich and famous in the process? Or will doubling down on this plan just double Greg’s troubles?

  • The Not-So-Boring Letters of Private Nobody - Twelve-year-old Oliver Prichard is obsessed with the Civil War. He knows everything about it: the battles, the generals, every movement of the Union and Confederate Armies. So when the last assignment of seventh-grade history is a project on the Civil War, Oliver is over the moon–until he’s partnered with Ella Berry, the slacker girl with the messy hair who does nothing but stare out the window. And when Oliver finds out they have to research a random soldier named Private Raymond Stone who didn’t even fight in any battles before dying of some boring disease, Oliver knows he’s doomed. But Ella turns out to be very different from what Oliver expected. As the partners film their documentary about Private Stone–with Oliver’s friend Kevin signing on as their head writing consultant–Oliver discovers that sometimes the most interesting things are hiding in uninteresting places. Even Private Stone is better than expected: There’s a mystery buried in his past, and Oliver knows he can figure it out.

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Mercy Watson: Something Wonky This Way Comes
Written by Kate DiCamillo & illustrated by Chris Van Dusen
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 5-9

The porcine wonder is off to the drive-in — and driven to follow that buttery smell — in a comic crescendo that reunites a familiar cast of characters.

Some may find it wonky to take a pig to the movies. But not Mr. and Mrs. Watson, who think the title of the film is inspirational. And not their beloved Mercy, who is inspired by the fact that the drive-in proudly serves real butter on its Bottomless Bucket of popcorn. So when they pull up in their convertible, Mercy lifts her snout and becomes a pig on a mission – for what is more heavenly than being hot on the trail of a true butter smell? Masterful slapstick director Kate DiCamillo sends Mercy on a delirious chase, followed by a trail of hapless rescuers that fans will recognize from prior episodes. And Chris Van Dusen’s comic retro illustrations perfectly capture a nostalgic pastime – along with the newest antics of a charmingly single-minded pig.

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Smile: How Young Charlie Chaplin Taught the World to Laugh (and Cry)
Written by Gary Golio & illustrated by Ed Young
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-9

An award-winning author and a Caldecott Medalist take a creative look at the early life of comedic genius Charlie Chaplin.

Once there was a little slip of a boy who roamed the streets of London, hungry for life (and maybe a bit of bread). His dad long gone and his actress mother ailing, five-year-old Charlie found himself onstage one day taking his mum’s place, singing and drawing laughs amid a shower of coins. There were times in the poorhouse and times spent sitting in the window at home with Mum, making up funny stories about passersby. And when Charlie described a wobbly old man he saw in baggy clothes, with turned-out feet and a crooked cane, his mother found it sad, but Charlie knew that funny and sad go hand in hand. With a lyrical text and exquisite collage imagery, Gary Golio and Ed Young interpret Charlie Chaplin’s path from his childhood through his beginnings in silent film and the creation of his iconic Little Tramp. Keen-eyed readers will notice a silhouette of the Little Tramp throughout the book that becomes animated with a flip of the pages. An Afterword fills in facts about the beloved performer who became one of the most famous entertainers of all time.

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The Log Driver's Waltz
Written by Wade Hemsworth & illustrated by Jennifer Phelan
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-99

Acclaimed illustrator Jennifer Phelan reimagines Wade Hemsworth’s iconic log driver in a beautiful, contemporary picture-book adaptation of a beloved Canadian classic. If you ask any girl from the parish around What pleases her most from her head to her toes She’ll say I’m not sure that it’s business of yours But I do like to waltz with a log driver Based on the perennially popular Canadian folk song and animated short film of the same name, The Log Driver’s Waltz showcases a spunky, independent young woman whose parents are keen for her to marry. The town’s well-to-do doctors, merchants, and lawyers try to impress her, but it’s the humble log driver—with his style, grace, and joie de vivre—who captures her attention. When she and the log driver finally meet on the dance floor, their joy leaps off the page. With homages to the original film, and celebrating the flora, fauna, and folk art of this great land, The Log Driver’s Waltz brings a hallmark of Canadian childhood to life.

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Pete Milano's Guide to Being a Movie Star
Written by Tommy Greenwald
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12

Pete Milano has always been the class clown and proud of it. What’s the point of having friends if you can’t make them laugh, right? Even if doing so has the unfortunate side effect of constantly getting him into trouble. But, for once, Pete’s tricks have led him to just the right place at just the right time. Now he’s about to become famous, because he’s been asked to audition for the hottest new movie with the hottest girl costar. But balancing real life with movie life is way harder than it sounds. Will Pete’s newfound fame mean losing his girlfriend and all his friends?

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Wizard of Oz (10 Minute Classics)
Written by & illustrated by Maggie Blossom, Asha Pearse, and L. Frank Baum
picture book
Recommend Ages: 7-12

You just never know when a twister is going to whisk you off to a magical land of witches, munchkins, and great adventures with new friends. One minute Dorothy and her dog Toto were home in Kansas, and the next they were teaming up with the Cowardly Lion, Tin Man, and Scarecrow to save the magical land of Oz from the Wicked Witch. Best of all, they realized how brave, loving, and kind each of their friends are and that no matter how wonderful an adventure may be, there just isn’t any place as wonderful as home. This adapted and condensed fully illustrated version of the tale by L. Frank Baum will introduce young readers to the beloved characters from the original and give them a taste of the adventure-filled classic. About the 10 Minute Classics series: The 10 Minute Classics series is a great introduction to classic literature, designed to spark a love for great stories and an openness to the classics as reading skills progress. These short, fully illustrated dust-jacketed picture books introduce key characters, storylines, and settings to engage young readers. A broad range of titles is now available, including: Moby Dick, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Little Women , and more.

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