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Sense and Sensibility Quotes

26 of the best book quotes from Sense and Sensibility
  1. #1
    “I wish, as well as everybody else, to be perfectly happy; but, like everybody else, it must be in my own way.”
  2. #2
    “It isn’t what we say or think that defines us, but what we do.”
  3. #3
    “When I fall in love, it will be forever.”
  4. #4
    “Run mad as often as you choose, but do not faint!”
  5. #5
    “I will be calm. I will be mistress of myself.”
  6. #6
    “The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!”
  7. #7
    “If I could but know his heart, everything would become easy.”
  8. #8
    “Know your own happiness. You want nothing but patience- or give it a more fascinating name, call it hope.”
  1. #9
    “I wish, as well as everybody else, to be perfectly happy; but, like everybody else, it must be in my own way.”
  2. #10
    “It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy;—it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others.”
  3. #11
    “It is not everyone,′ said Elinor, ‘who has your passion for dead leaves.”
  4. #12
    Elinor agreed to it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition.
  5. #13
    To wish was to hope, and to hope was to expect.
  6. #14
    “Always resignation and acceptance. Always prudence and honour and duty. Elinor, where is your heart?”
  7. #15
    “There is something so amiable in the prejudices of a young mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of more general opinions.”
  8. #16
    “I have not wanted syllables where actions have spoken so plainly.”

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  1. #17
    “He admires as a lover, not as a connoisseur. To satisfy me, those characters must be united. I could not be happy with a man whose taste did not in every point coincide with my own. He must enter into all my feelings; the same books, the same music must charm us both.”
  2. #18
    Marianne Dashwood was born to an extraordinary fate. She was born to discover the falsehood of her own opinions, and to counteract, by her conduct, her most favourite maxims. She was born to overcome an affection formed so late in life as at seventeen, and with no sentiment superior to strong esteem and lively friendship, voluntarily to give her hand to another! -- and that other, a man who had suffered no less than herself under the event of a former attachment, -- whom, two years before, she had considered too old to be married, -- and who still sought the constitutional safeguard of a flannel waistcoat!
  3. #19
    She was stronger alone; and her own good sense so well supported her, that her firmness was as unshaken, her appearance of cheerfulness as invariable, as, with regrets so poignant and so fresh, it was possible for them to be.
  4. #20
    Sometimes one is guided by what they say of themselves, and very frequently by what other people say of them, without giving oneself time to deliberate and judge.
  5. #21
    Money can only give happiness where there is nothing else to give it.
  6. #22
    Brandon is just the kind of man whom every body speaks well of, and nobody cares about; whom all are delighted to see, and nobody remembers to talk to.
  7. #23
    ″. . . though where so many hours have been spent in convincing myself that I am right, is there not some reason to fear I may be wrong?”
  8. #24
    She was without any power, because she was without any desire of command over herself.
  9. #25
    For though a very few hours spent in hard labour of incessant talking will dispatch more subjects than can really be in common between any two rational creatures, yet with lovers it is different. Between them no subject is finished, no communication is even made, till it has been made at least twenty times over.
  10. #26
    He then departed, to make himself still more interesting, in the midst of a heavy rain.
Book Topics › patience
Children's Books About Patience