concept

money Quotes

100+ of the best book quotes about money
  1. #1
    “Treat your savings account like just another bill. It has to be paid every month or there are consequences. If you have direct deposit, have a portion of your paycheck automatically diverted into a savings account. Once it’s in there, forget about it. You never saw it anyway. It’s an emergency fund only (and vacations are not emergencies).”
  2. #2
    “Money is a guarantee that we may have what we want in the future. Though we need nothing at the moment it insures the possibility of satisfying a new desire when it arises.”
  3. #3
    “We’re not poor.”
  4. #4
    “But what drove Mamaw’s initial dislike were the parts of him that most resembled her. Mamaw apparently understood what would take me another twenty years to learn: that social class in America isn’t just about money. And her desire that her children do better than she had done extended past their education and employment and into the relationships they formed. When it came to spouses for her kids and parents for her grandkids, Mamaw felt, whether she knew it consciously, that she wasn’t good enough.”
  5. #5
    “Nothing is any fun if you can get as much of it as you want. Especially money.”
  6. #6
    “I have not a farthing, my friend, and all over the globe there is no letting of blood or taking a glister, without paying, or somebody paying for you.”
  7. #7
    “I’m not ambitious for a splendid fortune, but I know, by experience, how much genuine happiness can be had in a plain little house, where the daily bead is earned, and some privations give sweetness to the few pleasures. I am content to see Meg begin humbly, for if I am not mistaken, she will be rich in the possession of a good man’s heart, and that is better than a fortune.”
  8. #8
    “The policy of Lacedaemon was not to exact tribute from her allies, but merely to secure their subservience to her interests by establishing oligarchies among them; Athens, on the contrary, had by degrees deprived hers of their ships, and imposed instead contributions in money on all except Chios and Lesbos.”
  9. #9
    “Money is a needful and precious thing,—and, when well used, a noble thing,—but I never want you to think it is the first or only prize to strive for. I’d rather see you poor men’s wives, if you were happy, beloved, contented, than queens on thrones, without self- respect and peace.”
  10. #10
    ″When you use money to fight poverty, it can be of great value, but too often, you’re working at the margins. When you’re putting people on the moon, you’re inspiring all of us to achieve the maximum of human potential, which is how our greatest problems will eventually be solved.″
  11. #11
    “You will observe that the stories told are all about money-seekers, not about money-finders.”
  12. #12
    ″Time must be explicitly managed, like money. My students would sometimes roll their eyes at what they called ‘Pauschisms,’ but I stand by them. Urging students not to invest time on irrelevant details, I’d tell them: ‘It doesn’t matter how well you polish the underside of the banister.’ ″
  13. #13
    “People don’t buy stock; it gets sold to them. Don’t ever forget that.”
  14. #14
    “Money is the tool, my child, not the mason; it can help you make acquaintances but not true friends; and it might buy you a life of leisure but not a life of peace.”
  15. #15
    “There’s no nobility in poverty. I’ve been rich and I’ve been poor, and I choose rich every time. At least as a rich man, when I have to face my problems, I can show up in the back of a stretch limousine, wearing a two-thousand-dollar suit and a twenty-thousand-dollar gold watch! And, believe me, arriving in style makes your problems a helluva lot easier to deal with.”
  16. #16
    “Look at them; as much money as they make, every last one of them is broke! They spend every dime they have, trying to keep up with my lifestyle. But they can’t, because they don’t make enough. So they end up living paycheck to paycheck on a million bucks a year. It’s hard to imagine, considering how you grew up, but, nevertheless, it is what it is.”
  17. #17
    “Yeah, that’s right; money is the greatest single problem-solver known to man...”
  18. #18
    “If you set yourself to it, you can live the same life, rich or poor. You can keep on with your books and your ideas. You just got to say to yourself, “I’m a free man in here” - he tapped his forehead - “and you’re all right.”
  19. #19
    “It is curious how people take it for granted that they have a right to preach at you and pray over you as soon as your income falls below a certain level.”
  20. #20
    “I tell you that virtue is not given by money, but that from virtue comes money and every other good of man, public as well as private.”
  21. #21
    “If a man were really able to instruct mankind, to receive money for giving instruction would, in my opinion, be an honour to him.”
    author
    Plato
    book
    Apology
    character
    Socrates
    concepts
    teachingmoneyHonor
  1. #22
    “Money dignifies what is frivolous if unpaid for. It might still be well to sneer at “blue stockings with an itch for scribbling,” but it could not be denied that they could put money in their purses.”
  2. #23
    “I was making good money too, and it was honestly hard to consider walking away from it.”
  3. #24
    “The bourgeoisie has torn away from the family its sentimental veil, and has reduced the family relation to a mere money relation.”
  4. #25
    “Do not work primarily for money; do your duty to patients first and let the money follow; our life is short, we don’t live twice; the whirlwind will pick up the leaves and spin them, but then it will drop them and they will form a pile.”
  5. #26
    “She said, ‘You know that I love you.’
    And, despite herself, Coraline nodded. It was true: the other mother loved her. But she loved Coraline as a miser loves money, or a dragon loves its gold.”
  6. #27
    “For people with money you and your sister don’t seem to have much fun.”
  7. #28
    “Of my creation and creator I was absolutely ignorant, but I knew that I possessed no money, no friends, no kind of property. I was, besides, endued with a figure hideously deformed and loathsome; I was not even of the same nature as man. I was more agile than they and could subsist upon coarser diet; I bore the extremes of heat and cold with less injury to my frame; my stature far exceeded theirs. When I looked around I saw and heard of none like me. Was I, then, a monster, a blot upon the earth, from which all men fled and whom all men disowned?”
  8. #29
    “I was wearing my powder-blue suit... I was neat, clean, shaved and sober, and I didn’t care who knew it. I was everything the well-dressed private detective ought to be. I was calling on four million dollars.”
  9. #30
    It is not funny at all. Steel is power. Money is power. But of all the things in all the worlds, words are power.
  10. #31
    “He sounded like a man who had slept well and didn’t owe too much money.”
  11. #32
    “Yes, we are overcharged for everything nowadays. I should fancy that the real tragedy of the poor is that they can afford nothing but self-denial. Beautiful sins, like beautiful things, are the privilege of the rich.”
  12. #33
    “Wealth is the product of man’s capacity to think.”
  13. #34
    “I had a wholesome dread of the consequences of running in debt.”
  14. #35
    Unchain yourself, my son, escape its hold!
    How long will you remain a slave of gold?
    author
    Rumi
    book
    Masnavi
    concept
    money
  15. #36
    “If you knew there was somebody out here afoot that had two million dollars of your money, at what point would you quit lookin for em?
    That’s right. There ain’t no such a point. ”
  16. #37
    ″[Jurgis] could not hear it often enough; he could not ask with enough variations. Yes, they had bought the house, they had really bought it. It belonged to them, they had only to pay the money and it would be all right. Then Jurgis covered his face with his hands, for there were tears in his eyes, and he felt like a fool. But he had had such a horrible fright; strong man as he was, it left him almost too weak to stand up.”
  17. #38
    “This deep internalized shame gives rise to distorted thinking. The distorted thinking can be reduced to the belief that I’ll be okay if I drink, eat, have sex, get more money, work harder, etc.”
  18. #39
    “As it chanced, [Jurgis] had been hurt on a Monday, and had just paid for his last week’s board and his room rent, and spent nearly all the balance of his Saturday’s pay. He had less than seventy-five cents in his pockets, and a dollar and a half due him for the day’s work he had done before he was hurt. He might possibly have sued the company, and got some damages for his injuries, but he did not know this, and it was not the company’s business to tell him.”
  19. #40
    “The majority of people who fail to accumulate money sufficient for their needs, are, generally, easily influenced by the ‘opinions’ of others.”
  20. #41
    “Ona might have married and left them, but she would not, for she loved Teta Elzbieta. It was Jonas who suggested that they all go to America, where a friend of his had gotten rich. He would work, for his part, and the women would work, and some of the children, doubtless – they would live somehow. Jurgis, too, had heard of America. That was a country where, they said, a man might earn three rubles a day; and Jurgis figured what three rubles a day would mean, with prices as they were where he lived, and decided forthwith that he would go to America and marry, and be a rich man in the bargain. In that country, rich or poor, a man was free, it was said; he did not have to go into the army, he did not have to pay out his money to rascally officials – he might do as he pleased, and count himself as good as any other man.”
  21. #42
    “But Wang Lung thought of his land and pondered this way and that, with the sickened heart of deferred hope, how he could get back to it. He belonged, not to this scum which clung to the walls of a rich man’s house; nor did he belong to the rich man’s house. He belonged to the land and he could not live with any fullness until he felt the land under his feet and followed a plow in the springtime and bore a scythe in his hand at harvest.”
  1. #43
    “All I ask is my rights as a father; and you’re the last man alive to expect me to let her go for nothing; for I can see you’re one of the straight sort, Governor. Well, what’s a five pound note to you? And what’s Eliza to me?”
  2. #44
    “But that’s the nature of money. Whether you have it or not, whether you want it or not, whether you like it or not, it will try to define your days. Our task as human beings is not to let it.”
  3. #45
    “Be careful with your money.”
  4. #46
    “It’s not how much money we make that ultimately makes us happy between nine and five. It’s whether or not our work fulfills us. Being a teacher is meaningful.”
  5. #47
    “It’s folly to measure your success in money or fame. Success is measured only by your ability to say yes to these two questions: Did I do the work I needed to do? Did I give it everything I had?”
  6. #48
    “I began to experience the most powerful advantage of money: the ability to think of things besides money.”
  7. #49
    “He had no money and no home; he lived entirely on the road of the racing circuit, sleeping in empty stalls, carrying with him only a saddle, his rosary, and his books...The books were the closest things he had to furniture, and he lived in them the way other men live in easy chairs.”
  8. #50
    “Unlike money time comes to all of us in equal amounts. In fact, everyone has all the time there is—twenty-four hours a day. But what an astonishing variety in our use of that time and the results of our choices!
  9. #51
    “Of evils current upon earth The worst is money. Money ‘tis that sacks Cities, and drives men forth from hearth and home; Warps and seduces native innocence, And breeds a habit of dishonesty.”
  10. #52
    “Ulbrickson knew full well that money more or less grew on the trees at Yale, and that funds had been vastly easier to come by in 1928, before the Depression, than in 1936.”
  11. #53
    “If he needs a million acres to make him feel rich, seems to me he needs it ‘cause he feels awful poor inside hisself, and if he’s poor in hisself, there ain’t no million acres gonna make him feel rich, an’ maybe he’s disappointed that nothin’ he can do ‘ll make him feel rich.”
  12. #54
    “‘There are many things from which I might have derived good, by which I have not profited, I dare say,’ returned the nephew. ‘Christmas among the rest. . . . And therefore, uncle, though it has never put a scrap of gold or silver in my pocket, I believe that it has done me good, and will do me good; and I say, God bless it!‘”
  13. #55
    “A livelihood. I do not preach in vain.
    THere’s no apostle I would conterfeit;
    I mean to have money, wool and cheese and wheat”
  14. #56
    “The love of accumulating money grows an absorbing passion in men whose imaginations, even in the very beginning of their hoard, showed them no purpose beyond it.”
  15. #57
    “The money’s gone I don’t know where, and this is come from I don’t know where.”
  16. #58
    “He spread them out in heaps and bathed his hands in them; then he counted them and set them up in regular piles, and felt their rounded outline between his thumb and fingers, and thought fondly of the guineas that were only half-earned by the work in his loom, as if they had been unborn children.”
  17. #59
    “There’s debts we can’t pay like money debts, by paying extra for the years that have slipped by.”
  18. #60
    “So many people say, ‘Oh, I’m not interested in money.’ Yet they’ll work at a job for eight hours a day.”
  19. #61
    “He’ll tell you, perhaps . . . if you’re willing to pay.”
  20. #62
    “On the end of a rope
    he lets down a tin pail
    and you have to toss in fifteen cents
    and a nail
    and the shell of a great-great-great-
    grandfather snail.”
  21. #63
    “The philosophy of the rich and the poor is this: the rich invest their money and spend what is left. The poor spend their money and invest what is left.”
  1. #64
    “Bought, did you say? All these things? Has my little spendthrift been wasting money again?”
  2. #65
    “Then he pulls up the pail, makes a most careful count to see if you’ve paid him the proper amount.”
    author
    Dr. Seuss
    book
    The Lorax
    concept
    money
  3. #66
    “The weaver’s hand had known the touch of hard-won money even before the palm had grown to its full breadth; for twenty years, mysterious money had stood to him as the symbol of earthly good, and the immediate object of toil.”
  4. #67
    “He would on no account have exchanged those coins, which had become his familiars, for other coins with unknown faces.”
  5. #68
    “Don’t be addicted to money. Work to learn, don’t work for money. Work for knowledge.”
  6. #69
    “I called all my brothers and uncles and aunts and I said, ‘Listen here! Here’s a wonderful chance for the whole Once-ler Family to get mighty rich.‘”
  7. #70
    “I went right on biggering . . . selling more Thneeds. And I biggered my money, which everyone needs.”
    author
    Dr. Seuss
    book
    The Lorax
    concepts
    moneySize
  8. #71
    “I am concerned that too many people are focused too much on money and not on their greatest wealth, which is their education.”
  9. #72
    “Mameh’s sisters were more about money than anything else, and any hurts that popped up along the way, they just swept them under the rug. They were all trying hard to be American, you know, not knowing what to keep and what to leave behind.”
  10. #73
    “See, a marriage needs love. And God. And a little money. That’s all. The rest you can deal with. It’s not about black or white.”
  11. #74
    “Men are driven by who they are, what they do, and how much they make.”
  12. #75
    “And, perhaps, among us may be found generous spirits, who do not estimate honour and justice by dollars and cents.”
  13. #76
    “The man died without a penny, yet his children grew up to graduate from college, to become doctors, professors, teachers, and professionals.”
  14. #77
    “Then, when every last cent of their money was spent, the Fix-it-Up Chappie packed up and he went.”
  15. #78
    She had drawn her little feet under her, but she could not keep off the cold; and she dared not go home, for she had sold no matches, and could not take home even a penny of money.
  16. #79
    “I see that you are indifferent about money, which is a characteristic rather of those who have inherited their fortunes than of those who have acquired them; the makers of fortunes have a second love of money as a creation of their own, resembling the affection of authors for their own poems, or of parents for their children, besides that natural love of it for the sake of use and profit which is common to them and all men. And hence they are very bad company, for they can talk about nothing but the praises of wealth.”
  17. #80
    “Money and titles may be hereditary,” she would say, “but brains are not.”
  18. #81
    “Those friends who knew, laughed to scorn the idea that Marguerite St. Just had married a fool for the sake of the worldly advantages with which he might endow her. They knew, as a matter of fact, that Marguerite St. Just cared nothing about money, and still less about a title.”
  19. #82
    Nothing makes a man so adventurous as an empty pocket.
  20. #83
    He reached for his pocket, and found there, only reality.
  21. #84
    “There are a lot of people who will give money or materials, but very few who will give time and affection.”

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  1. #85
    I say no wealth is worth my life!
    author
    Homer
    book
    The Iliad
    character
    Achilles
    concepts
    worthmoneylife
  2. #86
    I have always heard it said that money is the rarest service, but the easiest to render. The remark struck me; I like to cite remarks that strike me.
  3. #87
    “I call people rich when they are able to gratify their imagination.”
  4. #88
    “I didn’t do it for the money. I did it because the music is better if someone is listening to it.”
  5. #89
    “...people hold onto life, no matter how miserable a situation they may be in, because they don’t know any other way of thinking or acting, also because they have the illusion that there is a chance they may find happiness someday or they may somehow come into money.”
  6. #90
    “A gold mine like Vegas breeds its own army, like any other gold mine. Hired muscle tends to accumulate in fast layers around money/power poles … and big money, in Vegas, is synonymous with the Power to protect it.”
  7. #91
    ″‘Well, then, I’ll put it off.’ I had no money. I sent my aunt an airmail letter asking her for fifty dollars and said it would be the last money I’d ask; after that she would be getting money back from me, as soon as I got that ship.”
  8. #92
    There will also be an American flag no larger than a child’s hand – glued to a lollipop stick and flying from the cash register.
  9. #93
    “It was a warm and beautiful day for hitchhiking. To get out of the impossible complexities of Chicago traffic I took a bus to Joliet, Illinois, went by the Joliet pen, stationed myself just outside town after a walk through its leafy rickety streets behind, and pointed my way. All the way from New York to Joliet by bus, and I had spent more than half my money.”
  10. #94
    “There is an important principle that guides our thinking about the relationship between parenting and money - and that principle is that more is not always better.”
  11. #95
    “‘I don’t care how much money you get,’ my dad used to tell me. ‘It’s not worth it if you’re not happy.’ That’s the most valuable piece of advice he ever gave me: Do what you want in life. To this day I’ve tried to follow that philosophy.”
  12. #96
    Trout, incidentally, had written a book about a money tree. It had twenty-dollar bills for leaves. Its flowers were government bonds. Its fruit was diamonds. It attracted human beings who killed each other around the roots and made very good fertilizer.
  13. #97
    They will not acknowledge how in fact hard money is to come by, and, therefore, those who have no money blame and blame and blame themselves.
  14. #98
    ″‘It’s not about the money. It’s about what I could do with it.‘”
  15. #99
    “Not all the gold, that is beneath the moon, Or ever hath been, of these toil-worn souls Might purchase rest for one.”
  16. #100
    “Mama: Oh—So now it’s life. Money is life. Once upon a time freedom used to be life—now it’s money. I guess the world really do change . . .
    Walter: No—it was always money, Mama. We just didn’t know about it.
    Mama: No . . . something has changed. You something new, boy. In my time we was worried about not being lynched . . . You ain’t satisfied or proud of nothing we done. I mean that you had a home; that we kept you out of trouble till you was grown; that you don’t have to ride to work on the back of nobody’s streetcar—You my children—but how different we done become.”
  17. #101
    “Empty pockets never held anyone back. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that.”
  18. #102
    “Walter: You wouldn’t understand yet, son, but your daddy’s gonna make a transaction . . . a business transaction that’s going to change our lives. . . . That’s how come one day when you ‘bout seventeen years old I’ll come home . . . I’ll pull the car up on the driveway . . . just a plain black Chrysler, I think, with white walls—no—black tires . . . the gardener will be clipping away at the hedges and he’ll say, ‘Good evening, Mr. Younger.’ And I’ll say, ‘Hello, Jefferson, how are you this evening?’ And I’ll go inside and Ruth will come downstairs and meet me at the door and we’ll kiss each other and she’ll take my arm and we’ll go up to your room to see you sitting on the floor with the catalogues of all the great schools in America around you. . . . All the great schools in the world! And—and I’ll say, all right son—it’s your seventeenth birthday, what is it you’ve decided? . . . Just tell me, what it is you want to be—and you’ll be it. . . . Whatever you want to be—Yessir! You just name it, son . . . and I hand you the world!”
  19. #103
    “Walter: We have decided to move into our house because my father—my father—he earned it for us brick by brick. We don’t want to make no trouble for nobody or fight no causes, and we will try to be good neighbors. And that’s all we got to say about that. We don’t want your money.”
  20. #104
    Whoever opined “Money can’t buy you happiness” obviously had far too much of the stuff.
  21. #105
    “And we needed that money so badly at the time, the whole family was elated. But Kota kept almost all the money for himself.”
  1. #106
    “Son — I come from five generations of people who was slaves and sharecroppers – but ain’t nobody in my family never let nobody pay ‘em no money that was a way of telling us we wasn’t fit to walk the earth. We ain’t never been that poor. We ain’t never been that — dead inside.”
  2. #107
    “If you don’t care about money, Nina dear, call it by its other names.”
    “Kruge? Scrub? Kaz’s one true love?”
    “Freedom, security, retribution.”
  3. #108
    “To this day, if I feel a contractor is overcharging me, I’ll pick up the phone, even if it’s only for $ 5,000 or $ 10,000, and I’ll complain. People say to me, “What are you bothering for, over a few bucks?” My answer is that the day I can’t pick up the telephone and make a twenty-five-cent call to save $10,000 is the day I’m going to close up shop.”
  4. #109
    “Gold cometh gladly and in increasing quantity to any man who will put no less than one-tenth of his earnings to create an estate for his future and that of his family.”
  5. #110
    “I found the road to wealth when I decided that a part of all I earned was mine to keep.”
  6. #111
    “There’s nothing in the world so demoralizing as money.”
    author
    Sophocles
    book
    Antigone
    character
    Creon
    concept
    money
  7. #112
    “A part of all you earn is yours to keep. It should be not less than a tenth no matter how little you earn. It can be as much more as you can afford.”
  8. #113
    “You’ve learned the lessons well. You first learned to live on less than you earn. Next you learned to seek advice from those who are competent. Lastly, you’ve learned to make gold work for you.”
  9. #114
    “Gold clingeth to the protection of the cautious owner who invests it under the advice of men wise in its handling.”
  10. #115
    “Provide in advance for the needs of thy growing age and the protection of thy family.”
  11. #116
    “All of your precious resources—time, energy, talent, passion, money—should only go to the buds of your life or your business that are the best, are fixable, and are indispensable. Otherwise, average sets in…”
  12. #117
    ″‘God gives people money to see how you’re going to handle it’ she said. And she intended to prove she knew how to handle it.”
  13. #118
    “The generous Treatment the Captain gave me, I can never enough remember; he would take nothing of me for my Passage, gave me twenty Ducats for the Leopard’s Skin, and forty for the Lyon’s Skin which I had in my Boat, and caused every thing I had in the Ship to be punctually deliver’d me, and what I was willing to sell he bought, such as the Case of Bottles, two of my Guns, and a Piece of the Lump of Bees-wax, for I had made Candles of the rest; in a word, I made about 220 Pieces of Eight of all my Cargo, and with this Stock I went on Shoar in the Brasils.”
  14. #119
    “And there is nothing wastes so rapidly as liberality, for even whilst you exercise it you lose the power to do so.”
  15. #120
    “I don’t care if your dad is the Sultan of Brunei. You happened to be born into a privileged family. What you do with that truth is completely up to you. I’m here because I want to be with you. But if I didn’t, all the money in the world wouldn’t have changed my feelings for you.”
  16. #121
    “The charitable say in effect, ‘I seem to have more than I need and you seem to have less than you need. I would like to share my excess with you.’ Fine, if my excess is tangible, money or goods, and fine if not, for I learned that to be charitable with gestures and words can bring enormous joy and repair injured feelings.”
  17. #122
    “Because beauty is power the way money is power the way a loaded gun is power.”
  18. #123
    “They were careless people, Tom and Daisy—they smashed up things and . . . then retreated back into their money . . . and let other people clean up the mess they had made.”
  19. #124
    “Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! - I have as much soul as you, - and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you!”
  20. #125
    “The stars are a free show; it don’t cost anything to use your eyes”
  21. #126
    “He is not to them what he is to me,” I thought: “he is not of their kind. I believe he is of mine- I am sure he is- I feel akin to him- I understand the language of his countenance and movements: though rank and wealth sever us widely, I have something in my brain and heart, in my blood and nerves, that assimilates me mentally to him.”

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  1. #127
    “It occurred to me that the reason my parents had no money was me. I’d sapped the family savings with Phalanxifor copays, and Mom couldn’t work because she had taken on the full-time profession of Hovering Over Me.”
  2. #128
    “Curiosity is a luxury reserved for the financially secure...”
  3. #129
    Money can only give happiness where there is nothing else to give it.
  4. #130
    “A poor excuse for picking a man’s pocket every twenty-fifth of December!” said Scrooge, buttoning his great-coat to the chin. “But I suppose you must have the whole day. Be here all the earlier next morning.”
  5. #131
    “You fear the world too much,” she answered, gently. “All your other hopes have merged into the hope of being beyond the chance of its sordid reproach. I have seen your nobler aspirations fall off one by one, until the master-passion, Gain, engrosses you. Have I not?”
  6. #132
    One dollar and eighty-seven cents. That was all. And sixty cents of it was in pennies. Pennies saved one and two at a time by bulldozing the grocer and the vegetable man and the butcher until one’s cheeks burned with the silent imputation of parsimony that such close dealing implied. Three times Della counted it. One dollar and eighty-seven cents. And the next day would be Christmas.
  7. #133
    A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of.
  8. #134
    ″‘Just pay me your money, then hop right aboard!’ So they clambered inside. Then the big machine roared.”
  9. #135
    “I’ll make you, again, the best Sneetches on beaches and all it will cost you is ten dollars eaches.”
  10. #136
    For I consider brains far superior to money in every way. You may have noticed that if one has money without brains, he cannot use it to his advantage; but if one has brains without money, they will enable him to live comfortably to the end of his days.
  11. #137
    ″‘I am too big to climb and play,’ said the boy. ‘I want to buy things and have fun. I want some money. Can you give me some money?‘”
  12. #138
    “Then you will have money and you will be happy.”
  13. #139
    “She had given it up, consoling herself with the vow that when she grew up, she would work hard, save money and buy every single book that she liked.”
  14. #140
    “The revenue arising from his school was small, and would have been scarcely sufficient to furnish him with daily bread, for he was a huge feeder, and, though lank, had the dilating powers of an anaconda; but to help out his maintenance, he was, according to country custom in those parts, boarded and lodged at the houses of the farmers whose children he instructed.”
  15. #141
    “He was satisfied with his wealth, but not proud of it; and piqued himself upon the hearty abundance, rather than the style in which he lived.”
  16. #142
    “Potential ideas are in your mind. By releasing and developing these ideas you can solve your financial problem, your business situation, you can care for yourself and your family, and attain success in your ventures.”
  17. #143
    “Remember, this is Asia, and first impressions can be deceiving. You know how most Asians hoard their money. The rich are even more extreme. Many of the wealthiest people here make an effort not to stand out, and most of the time, you would never know you were standing next to a billionaire.”
  18. #144
    “This is Singapore, and the idle rich spend all their time gossiping about other people’s money. Who’s worth how much, who inherited how much, who sold their house for how much.”
  19. #145
    “Within thirty seconds of learning their name and where they lived, she would implement her social algorithm and calculate precisely where they stood in her constellation based on who their family was, who else they were related to, what their approximate net worth might be, how the fortune was derived, and what family scandals might have occurred within the past fifty years.”
  20. #146
    “And, you remember our original intent was to use the emerging technology of genetic engineering to make money. A lot of money.”
  21. #147
    “For just a buck, you get the name and number of your one true soul mate. For five bucks, you get your top five.”
  1. #148
    “He who has no money is poor; he who has nothing but money is even poorer.”
  2. #149
    “How we spend Christmas is of greater significance than how much we spend for it.”
  3. #150
    ″‘What you do with her money, eh?’ Her voice was still quiet but with a hiss in it when she said ‘money.’ I thought, of course, that is what all the rigamarole is about. I no longer felt dazed, tired, half-hypnotized, but alert and wary, ready to defend myself.”
  4. #151
    “We don’t need as much as we have. Hardly any of us need as much money as we have. It’s true what they say about the best things in life being free.”
  5. #152
    “Feet are what connect you to the ground, and when you are poor, none of that ground belongs to you.”
  6. #153
    “Making a good woman feel secure in the relationship has nothing to do with how much money you spend ON HER, but rather how much quality time you are willing to spend with her.”
  7. #154
    “‘Happiness Begins Within.’ Money, social status, plastic surgery, beautiful houses, powerful positions – none of these will bring you happiness.”
  8. #155
    “I wasn’t worth a cent two years ago, and now I owe two millions of dollars.”
  9. #156
    “Many people think that happiness comes from having more power or more money.”
  10. #157
    “A lot of people think being happy means being rich or important.”
  11. #158
    “Well, there’s one thing to be said for money. It can make you rich.”
  12. #159
    “Red tape is no match for green money.”
  13. #160
    “Red tape is no match for green money.”
  14. #161
    “Money’s awfully nice to have. In fact, all things considered, I think, ‘Rene, that it’s even worth the price.”
  15. #162
    “There are plenty of laws to protect guys’ money even in war time but there’s nothing on the books says a man’s life’s his own.”
  16. #163
    “This power over the purse may, in fact, be regarded as the most complete and effectual weapon with which any constitution can arm the [people’s] immediate representatives. ”
  17. #164
    “This moment right now-is where we decide what kind of city Artemis is going to be. We can either act now, or let our home degenerate into syndicate rule for generations. This isn’t some theoretical scenario. They burned down a business. They murdered two people. There’s a huge amount of money in play - they’re not going to stop.”
  18. #165
    “No good can ever come from deviating from the path that you were destined to follow. You will be assailed by varieties of hidden pain. Most often you deviate because of the lure of money, of more immediate prospects of prosperity.Because this does not comply with something deep within you, your interest will lag and eventually the money will not come so easily.”
  19. #166
    “What is important when you are young, is to train yourself to get by with little money and make the most of your youthful energy.”
  20. #167
    ″‘Son, if you want to, one day you could make a million dollars.‘”
  21. #168
    “Anyone who believed that money saves all has never had any money--like me back then.”
  22. #169
    “She’s wanted dead or alive for murder. Ten thousand dollars. That money’s mine boys. Don’t want to share it, I ain’t going to lose it.”
Book Topics › happiness
Children's Books About Happiness
Book Topics › poverty
Children's Books About Poverty
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