Sisters: Chapter Books For Kids

Looking for a list of the best children's books about sisters?

“Sisters, sisters, there were never such devoted sisters!” This list of the best books about sisters will pull at the heartstrings of any sister as they read about the love, differences, drama, tenderness, and endearment that comes from sisterhood. From favorites like the Bennet and Marsh sisters to more recent favorites like Beezus & Ramona, these literary sisters display the sisterly-bond perfectly.

Little Women  book
#1
Little Women
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-14
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm

Little Women is such a fantastic book. At some points it was almost too “cheesy” for me, but I couldn’t help but just love it all. The bond between the sisters, their adventures, and the lessons woven throughout the book are wonderful. I love their wise, caring, service-minded mother. The writing is beautiful and I never wanted to put it down. There’s wonderful character development, especially watching friendships and relationships grow along with the sisters growing up, themselves.

Little Women is a novel by American author Louisa May Alcott (1832–1888), which was originally published in two volumes in 1868 and 1869. Alcott wrote the books rapidly over several months at the request of her publisher. The novel follows the lives of four sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March—detailing their passage from childhood to womanhood, and is loosely based on the author and her three sisters. Little Women was an immediate commercial and critical success, and readers demanded to know more about the characters. Alcott quickly completed a second volume (entitled Good Wives in the United Kingdom, although this name derived from the publisher and not from Alcott). It was also successful. The two volumes were issued in 1880 in a single work entitled Little Women. Alcott also wrote two sequels to her popular work, both of which also featured the March sisters: Little Men (1871) and Jo’s Boys (1886). Although Little Women was a novel for girls, it differed notably from the current writings for children, especially girls. The novel addressed three major themes: “domesticity, work, and true love, all of them interdependent and each necessary to the achievement of its heroine’s individual identity.”

Little House in the Big Woods book
#2
Little House in the Big Woods
Written by Laura Ingalls Wilder and illustrated by Garth Williams
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Laura Ingalls’s story begins in 1871 in a little log cabin on the edge of the Big Woods of Wisconsin. Four-year-old Laura lives in the little house with her Pa, her Ma, her sisters Mary and Carrie, and their trusty dog, Jack. Pioneer life is sometimes hard, since the family must grow or catch all their own food as they get ready for the cold winter. But it is also exciting as Laura and her folks celebrate Christmas with homemade toys and treats, do the spring planting, bring in the harvest, and make their first trip into town. And every night they are safe and warm in their little house, with the happy sound of Pa’s fiddle sending Laura and her sisters off to sleep. And so begins Laura Ingalls Wilder’s beloved story of a pioneer girl and her family. The nine Little House books have been cherished by generations of readers as both a unique glimpse into America’s frontier past and a heartwarming, unforgettable story.

The Two Princesses of Bamarre book
#3
The Two Princesses of Bamarre
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm

This story of some not so average princesses is full of adventure, but the main reason I like it is because of the courage, bravery, and love it entails. When one sister gets ill, the other steps out of her comfort zone and stands up to danger in order to help her sister.

When plague strikes Bamarre, Princess Addie must fulfill an ancient prophecy. Brave and adventurous, Princess Meryl dreams of fighting dragons and protecting the kingdom of Bamarre. Shy and fearful, Princess Addie is content to stay within the safety of the castle walls. The one thing that the sisters share is their unwavering love for each other. The tables are turned, however, when the Gray Death leaves Meryl fatally ill. To save her sister, meek Princess Addie must find the courage to set out on a dangerous quest filled with dragons, unknown magic, and death itself. Time is running out, and the sisters’ lives—and the future of the kingdom of Bamarre—hang in the balance.

Andi Unexpected book
#4
Andi Unexpected
Written by Amanda Flower
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm

This story shows how grief is manifested in different ways, but how the two sisters and their guardian bonded together and strengthened one another in their difficult times. I also loved that the mystery was about Andi’s family history and linked to the great depression, both of which are great topics for readers to learn about. I loved following along in their sleuthing and detective efforts to figure out the answer to their mystery. :)

The first in a new middle-grade mystery series, in Andi Unexpected, twelve-year-old Andi Boggs, discovers evidence of her forgotten namesake, a missing relative, which leads her into a family mystery rooted in the Great Depression.

The Bad Beginning book
#5
The Bad Beginning
Written by Lemony Snicket and illustrated by Michael Kupperman and Brett Helquist
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire are intelligent children. They are charming, and resourceful, and have pleasant facial features. Unfortunately, they are exceptionally unlucky.

In the first two books alone, the three youngsters encounter a greedy and repulsive villain, itchy clothing, a disastrous fire, a plot to steal their fortune, a lumpy bed, a deadly serpent, a large brass reading lamp, a long knife, and a terrible odor.

In the tradition of great storytellers, from Dickens to Dahl, comes an exquisitely dark comedy that is both literary and irreverent, hilarious and deftly crafted. Never before has a tale of three likeable and unfortunate children been quite so enchanting, or quite so uproariously unhappy.

  1. Pride and Prejudice - Since its publication in 1813, Pride and Prejudice’s blend of humor, romance, and social satire have delighted readers of all ages. In telling the story of Mr. and Mrs. Bennett and their five daughters, Jane Austen creates a miniature of her world, where social grace and the nuances of behavior predominate in the making of a great love story.

  2. Annie's Adventures - On New Year’s Eve, the octuplets Huit—Annie, Durinda, Georgia, Jackie, Marcia, Petal, Rebecca, and Zinnia—discover that their parents are missing, and then uncover a mysterious note instructing them that each must find her power and her gift if they want to know what happened to their parents. Simultaneous.

  3. Beezus and Ramona - Ramona Quimby is the youngest of all the famous characters in Mrs. Cleary’s wonderful Henry Huggins stories. She is also far and away the most deadly. Readers of the earlier books will remember that Ramona has always been a menace to Beezus, her older sister, to Henry, and to his dog Ribsy. It is not that Ramona deliberately sets out to make trouble for other people. She simply has more imagination than is healthy for any one person. In this book Ramona and her imagination really come into their own. Starting with a fairly mild encounter with the librarian, which is harder on Beezus than anyone else, Ramona goes from strength to strength, winding up by inviting her entire kindergarten class to a part at her home without mentioning it to her mother. The riot that ensues is probably the most hilarious episode in this extremely funny book, which proves that Mrs. Cleary’s imagination is almost as lively as Ramona’s.

  4. The Final Battle... for Now - The Huit octuplets, each of whom has now discovered her power and received her gift, finally learn where their parents are, but before they can attempt a rescue they must face the Other Eights and a very scary aunt.

Zinnia's Zaniness book
#10
Zinnia's Zaniness
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-9

With the arrival of August, Zinnia, the youngest of the Huit octuplets, eagerly anticipates getting her power and gift, both of which hold big surprises that are revealed to the sisters on their 8th birthday, in the penultimate episode of the Sisters Eight saga. Simultaneous.

Durinda's Dangers book
#11
Durinda's Dangers
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-9

One month after their parents’ disappearance, the third-grade Huit octuplets deal with a malfunctioning refrigerator and try to win the love of the only boy in their class at Valentine’s Day, while Dorinda discovers her special power and gift. Simultaneous.

Petal's Problems book
#12
Petal's Problems
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-9

During the month of June, Petal, one of the eight Huit octuplets, gets her power, which she uses to great advantage when Crazy Aunt Serena tries to kidnap Rebecca and throw her off the Eiffel Tower while the rest of the family attends a wedding.

Jackie's Jokes book
#13
Jackie's Jokes
Written and illustrated by Lauren Baratz-Logsted
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-9

April Fools’ Day is long and hard for the third-grade Huit octuplets, but it is nothing compared to the challenges of Tax Day, through which Jackie discovers her special power and gift and learns more about their parents’ mysterious disappearance. Simultaneous.

The Sisters Eight Book 7: Rebecca's Rashness book
#14
The Sisters Eight Book 7: Rebecca's Rashness
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-9

When Rebecca demonstrates superhuman strength she brings unwanted publicity to the Huit octuplets, but much greater danger is in store when she acquires the power to shoot fire from her fingertips.

  1. Georgia's Greatness - As the Huit octuplets prepare for a St. Patrick’s Day parade, Georgia discovers her powers and uncovers the substitute teacher’s secret.

  2. Marcia's Madness - Questions! Questions! Questions! The Sisters Eight have so many questions and so few answers! Luckily, one more month means they’ll get a few answers. Marcia’s month is about to begin. You remember Marcia, right? The sensible one? The one who would never do anything . . . crazy?

Did you enjoy our children's book recommendations? Did we miss one of your favorites? Let us know in the comments below!