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Edgar Allen Poe Quotes

35 of the best book quotes from Edgar Allen Poe
  1. #1
    “Thrilled me—filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;”
  2. #2
    Feel a glory in so rolling
    On the human heart a stone
  3. #3
    “How we shiver with affright.”
  4. #4
    What a horror they outpour
  5. #5
    “What a tale their terror tells.”
  6. #6
    “There was an iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart - an unredeemed dreariness of thought which no goading of the imagination could torture into aught of the sublime.”
  7. #7
    “But our love it was stronger by far than the love
    Of those who were older than we—
    Of many far wiser than we—
    And neither the angels in Heaven above
    Nor the demons down under the sea
    Can ever dissever my soul from the soul”
  8. #8
    “I smiled,—for what had I to fear?”
  9. #9
    “They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night.”
  10. #10
    “It is impossible to say how first the idea entered my brain; but once conceived, it haunted me day and night.”
  11. #11
    “True, nervous, very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am, but why will say that I am mad?! The disease had sharpened my senses, not destroyed, not dulled them. Above all was the sense of hearing acute.”
  12. #12
    “Now this is the point. You fancy me a mad. Madmen know nothing. But you should have seen me. You should have seen how wisely I proceeded...”
  13. #13
    “Who has not, a hundred times, found himself committing a vile or a silly action for no other reason than because he knows he should not?”
  14. #14
    “Yet mad I am not...and very surely do I not dream.”
  15. #15
    “Leave my loneliness unbroken”
  16. #16
    “Quoth the Raven, “Nevermore.”
  17. #17
    “Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before.”
  18. #18
    “That is another of your odd notions,” said the Prefect, who had a fashion of calling every thing “odd” that was beyond his comprehension, and thus lived amid an absolute legion of “oddities.”
  19. #19
    “And then there stole into my fancy, like a rich musical note, the thought of what sweet rest there must be in the grave.”
  20. #20
    “In the deepest slumber-no! In delirium-no! In a swoon-no! In death-no! even in the grave all is not lost.”
  21. #21
    “I call to mind flatness and dampness; and then all is madness - the madness of a memory which busies itself among forbidden things.”
  22. #22
    “A million candles have burned themselves out. Still I read on.”
  23. #23
    “Science has its place in man’s search for understanding, but science and the imagination have tended to bifurcate in the modern world; only the true poetic intellect can end this long-established dualism.”
  24. #24
    “There are few persons who have not, at some period of their lives, amused themselves in retracing the steps by which particular conclusions of their own minds have been attained. The occupation is often full of interest and he who attempts it for the first time is astonished by the apparently illimitable distance and incoherence between the starting-point and the goal.”
  25. #25
    “As a poet and as a mathematician, he would reason well; as a mere mathematician, he could not have reasoned at all.”
  26. #26
    “It will be found, in fact, that the ingenious are always fanciful, and the truly imaginative never otherwise than analytic.”
  27. #27
    “For the moon never beams without bringing me dreams”
  28. #28
    “Have we not a perpetual inclination, in the teeth of our best judgment, to violate that which is Law, merely because we understand it to be such?”
  29. #29
    “But we loved with a love that was more than love, I and my Annabel Lee.”
  30. #30
    “You will observe that the stories told are all about money-seekers, not about money-finders.”
  31. #31
    “I continued, as was my wont, to smile in his face, and he did not perceive that my smile now was at the thought of his immolation.”
  32. #32
    “Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore...”
  33. #33
    “I was deeply interested in the little family history which he detailed to me with all that candor which a Frenchman indulges whenever mere self is the theme.”
  34. #34
    “Coincidences, in general, are great stumbling-blocks in the way of that class of thinkers who have been educated to know nothing of the theory of probabilities---that theory to which the most glorious objects of human research are indebted for the most glorious of illustration.”
  35. #35
    “How they scream out their affright!”
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