concept

nature Quotes

100+ of the best book quotes about nature
  1. #1
    “All over America today people would be dragging themselves to work, stuck in traffic jams, wreathed in exhaust smoke. I was going for a walk in the woods. ”
  2. #2
    “I hate all the technology on the trail. Some AT hikers... carry laptop computers and modems, so they can file daily reports to their family and friends.”
  3. #3
    “Woods are not like other spaces... They make you feel small.. like a small child lost in a crowd of strange legs. Stand in a desert or prairie and you know you are in a big space. Stand in a woods and you only sense it. They are a vast featureless nowhere. And they are alive.”
  4. #4
    “When you’re on the AT, the forest is your universe, infinite and entire. It is all you experience day after day. Eventually it is about all you can imagine.”
  5. #5
    “Compared with most other places in the developed world, America is still to a remarkable extent a land of forests. One-third o the landscape of the lower forty-eight states is covered in trees. ”
  6. #6
    “Perhaps…” Miss Whitlaw tapped a finger against her lips for a moment. “Perhaps the truth of the dragon lies somewhere in between the American and the Chinese versions. He is neither all-bad nor all-good, neither all-destruction nor all-kind. He is a creature particularly in tune with Nature, and so, like Nature, he can be very, very kind or very, very terrible. If you love him, you will accept what he is. Otherwise he will destroy you.”
  7. #7
    “Lavender’s blue,
    Rosemary’s green,
    When you are king,
    I shall be queen”
  8. #8
    “And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.”
  9. #9
    “As they rounded a curve, it appeared as if the mountains pulled away from each other, like a curtain opening on a stage, revealing the San Joaquin Valley beyond. Flat and spacious, it spread out like a blanket of patchwork fields. Esperanza could see no end to the plots of yellow, brown, and shades of green.”
  10. #10
    A love of nature keeps no factories busy.
  11. #11
    “Nature is the direct expression of the divine imagination.”
  12. #12
    “Nature so works in that everybody gets a turn at getting what they deserve in one way or another.”
  13. #13
    “Your art would follow nature,
    just as a pupil imitates his master;
    ... your art is almost God’s grandchild.”
    author
    Dante
    person
    God
    book
    Inferno
    character
    Virgil
    concepts
    artnaturecreationcreativity
  14. #14
    “Do you remember what Darwin says about music? He claims that the power of producing and appreciating it existed among the human race long before the power of speech was arrived at. Perhaps that is why we are so subtly influenced by it. There are vague memories in our souls of those misty centuries when the world was in its childhood.′
    That’s a rather broad idea,′ I remarked.
    One’s ideas must be as broad as Nature if they are to interpret Nature,′ he answered.”
  15. #15
    “It was ... time to lie snug in a hole ... and wait for a curtain of cloud to be drawn across the face of ... space. ”
  16. #16
    “He was a newcomer to the land, a chechaquo, and this was his first winter. The trouble with him was that he was without imagination. ”
  17. #17
    “Nature is a haunted house--but Art--is a house that tries to be haunted.”
  18. #18
    Look, Chief, you can’t go off half-cocked looking for vengeance against a fish. That shark isn’t evil. It’s not a murderer. It’s just obeying its own instincts.
  19. #19
    “Four of my teammates died not so much because Rob Hall’s systems were faulty […] but because on Everest it is the nature of systems to break down with a vengeance.”
  20. #20
    “Four hundred vertical feet above, where the summit was still washed in bright sunlight under an immaculate cobalt sky, my compadres dallied to memorialize their arrival at the apex of the planet, unfurling flags and snapping photos, using up precious ticks of the clock.”
  21. #21
    “Nature is a chain reaction. One thing follows the other, everything is dependent on something else. The smallest is as important as the largest.”
  22. #22
    “Human nature will be the last part of Nature to surrender to Man. The battle will then be won.”
  23. #23
    “Do you understand this feeling? This breeze, which has traveled from the regions towards which I am advancing, gives me a foretaste of those icy climes. Inspirited by this wind of promise, my daydreams become more fervent and vivid. I try in vain to be persuaded that the pole is the seat of frost and desolation; it ever presents itself to my imagination as the region of beauty and delight. There, Margaret, the sun is forever visible, its broad disk just skirting the horizon and diffusing a perpetual splendour.”
  24. #24
    “What we call Man’s power over Nature turns out to be a power exercised by some men over other men with Nature as its instrument.”
  25. #25
    “Lord Henry went out to the garden and found Dorian Gray burying his face in the great cool lilac-blossoms, feverishly drinking in their perfume as if it had been wine. He came close to him and put his hand upon his shoulder. ‘You are quite right to do that,’ he murmured. ‘Nothing can cure the soul but the senses, just as nothing can cure the senses but the soul.‘”
  26. #26
    “But I am done with apple-picking now.
    Essence of winter sleep is on the night,
    The scent of apples: I am drowsing off.”
  27. #27
    “The city had withdrawn into itself
    And left at last the country to the country;”
  1. #28
    “The way a crow
    Shook down on me
    The dust of snow
    From a hemlock tree
    Has given my heart
    A change of mood
    And saved some part
    Of a day I had rued.”
  2. #29
    “When I see birches bend to left and right
    Across the lines of straighter darker trees,
    I like to think some boy’s been swinging them.”
  3. #30
    “I’d like to go by climbing a birch tree,
    And climb black branches up a snow-white trunk
    Toward heaven, till the tree could bear no more,
    But dipped its top and set me down again.
    That would be good both going and coming back.
    One could do worse than be a swinger of birches.”
  4. #31
    “My long scythe whispered and left the hay to make.”
  5. #32
    “Before man came to blow it right
    The wind once blew itself untaught,
    And did its loudest day and night
    In any rough place where it caught.”
  6. #33
    “When Augustus came out on the porch the blue pigs were eating a rattlesnake—not a very big one.”
  7. #34
    “Sometimes she heard night-sounds she didn’t know or jumped from lightning too close, but whenever she stumbled, it was the land who caught her. Until at last, at some unclaimed moment, the heart-pain seeped away like water into sand. Still there, but deep. Kya laid her hand upon the breathing, wet earth, and the marsh became her mother.”
  8. #35
    “The very nature of Joy makes nonsense of our common distinction between having and wanting.”
  9. #36
    “She knew the years of isolation had altered her behavior until she was different from others, but it wasn’t her fault she’d been alone. Most of what she knew, she’d learned from the wild. Nature had nurtured, tutored, and protected her when no one else would.”
  10. #37
    “Now that the joy and sorrow are over, I have that to tell you about the land.”
  11. #38
    “Do you take it I would astonish?
    Does the daylight astonish? does the early red start twittering through the woods?
    Do I astonish more than they?”
  12. #39
    “This forest eats itself and lives forever.”
  13. #40
    “I am enamour’d of growing out-doors.”
  14. #41
    “Do not be discouraged by the resistance you will encounter from your human nature; you must go against your human inclinations. ”
  15. #42
    “Why do poets always talk about the ocean’s waves,
    about their single file march to shore,
    and yet never talk about my grandmother’s farts,
    which arrive in time, one after the other, with equal regularity?”
  16. #43
    “If God had amused himself inventing the lilies of the field, he surely knocked His own socks off with the African parasites.”
  17. #44
    ″‘When I want to take God at his word exactly, I take a peep out the window at Creation. Because that, darling, He makes fresh for us every day without a lot of dubious middle managers.‘”
  18. #45
    “The death of something living is the price of our survival, and we pay it again and again. We have no choice. It is the one solemn promise every life on earth is born and bound to keep.”
  19. #46
    “It seems strange to many people that I should be impressed by the wonders and beauties of Niagara. They are always asking: ‘what does this beauty or that music mean to you? You cannot see the waves rolling up the beach or hear their roar. What do they mean to you?’ In the most evident sense they mean everything.”
  20. #47
    “The desert sharpened the sweet ache of his longing, amplified it, gave shape to it in sere geology and clean slant of light.”
  21. #48
    “This day I shalt have to do with an idle curious man, with an unthankful man, a railer, a crafty, false, or an envious man; an unsociable uncharitable man. All these ill qualities have happened unto them, through ignorance of that which is truly good and truly bad. But I that understand the nature of that which is good, that it only is to be desired, and of that which is bad, that it only is truly odious and shameful: who know moreover, that this transgressor, whosoever he be, is my kinsman, not by the same blood and seed, but by participation of the same reason, and of the same divine particle; How can I either be hurt by any of those, since it is not in their power to make me incur anything that is truly reproachful?”
  22. #49
    “His body is a paradox of mass and lightness, crafted to slip through air with the ease of an arrow. His mind is impressed with a single command: run. He pursues speed with superlative courage, pushing beyond defeat, beyond exhaustion, sometimes beyond the structural limits of bone and sinew. In flight, he is nature’s ultimate wedding of form and purpose.”
  23. #50
    “As for those things that are commonly said to happen by fortune, even those must be conceived to have dependence from nature, or from that first and general connection, and concatenation of all those things, which more apparently by the divine providence are administered and brought to pass.”
  24. #51
    “When you are next to the earth, you can hear her secrets.”
  25. #52
    “At first, the sea, the earth, and the heaven, which covers all things, were the only face of nature throughout the whole universe, which men have named Chaos; a rude and undigested mass, and nothing more than an inert weight, and the discordant atoms of things not harmonizing, heaped together in the same spot.”
  26. #53
    “The mass nature of wartime death is useful in many ways. It serves as spectacle, as diversion from the real movements of the War.”
  27. #54
    “Our earth is like a child who has grown up without parents, having no one to guide and direct her...Some have attempted to help her, but most have simply tries to use her.”

Books about community

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The House That Jane Built book
Picture book
6.0
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The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles book
Picture book
5.9
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The Stars Just Up the Street book
Picture book
5.8
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What Grew in Larry's Garden book
Picture book
5.7
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A True Home book
Chapter book
5.5
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The Mermaid's Purse book
Picture book
5.5
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Windows book
Picture book
5.5
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Miss Rumphius book
Picture book
5.5
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  1. #55
    “There was something rather blousy about roses in full bloom, something shallow and raucous, like women with untidy hair”
  2. #56
    The earth had donned her mantle of brightest green; and shed her richest perfumes abroad. It was the prime and vigour of the year; all things were glad and flourishing.
  3. #57
    The earth had donned her mantle of brightest green; and shed her richest perfumes abroad. It was the prime and vigour of the year; all things were glad and flourishing.
  4. #58
    “I had an inheritance from my father,
    It was the moon and the sun.
    And though I roam all over the world,
    The spending of it’s never done.”
  5. #59
    “To sit in the shade on a fine day, and look upon verdure, is the most perfect refreshment.”
  6. #60
    “Had she been ensconced here under other and more pleasant conditions she would have become alarmed; but, outside humanity, she had at present no fear.”
  7. #61
    “The bodies of irrational animals are bent toward the ground, whereas man was made to walk erect with his eyes on heaven, as though to remind him to keep his thoughts on things above.”
  8. #62
    “There are three things which every artificer must possess if he is to effect anything,—nature, education, practice. Nature is to be judged by capacity, education by knowledge, practice by its fruit.”
  9. #63
    “No man, one sees, can understand and estimate the entire structure or its parts – what are its frailties and what its repairs, without knowing the nature of the materials.”
  10. #64
    “By their very nature chemical controls are self-defeating, for they have been devised and applied without taking into account the complex biological systems against which they have been blindly hurled.”
  11. #65
    “The balance of nature is not a status quo; it is fluid, ever shifting, in a constant state of adjustment. Man, too, is part of this balance.”
  12. #66
    “In nature, nothing exists alone.”
  13. #67
    “We in this generation, must come to terms with nature, and I think we’re challenged as mankind has never been challenged before to prove our maturity and our mastery, not of nature, but of ourselves.”
  14. #68
    “Can anyone believe it is possible to lay down such a barrage of poisons on the surface of the Earth without making it unfit for all life?”
  15. #69
    “Water must be thought of in terms of the chains of life it supports.”
  16. #70
    “The more clearly we can focus our attention on the wonders and realities of the universe about us, the less taste we shall have for destruction.”
  17. #71
    “Even in the vast and mysterious reaches of the sea we are brought back to the fundamental truth that nothing lives to itself.”
  18. #72
    “Man’s attitude toward nature is today critically important simply because we have now acquired a fateful power to alter and destroy nature. But man is a part of nature, and his war against nature is inevitably a war against himself.”
  19. #73
    “The history of life on earth has been a history of interaction between living things and their surroundings.”
  20. #74
    “In this now universal contamination of the environment, chemicals are the sinister and little-recognized partners of radiation in changing the very nature of the world—the very nature of its life.”
  21. #75
    “From a caprice of nature, not from the ignorance of man. Not a mistake has been made in the working. But we cannot prevent equilibrium from producing its effects. We may brave human laws, but we cannot resist natural ones.”
  22. #76
    ““. . .the development of resistance to insecticides is changing the genetic factors of insects and perhaps other organisms . . . Some experts warn of subtle but far-reaching vegetational shifts”
  23. #77
    “It is an extraordinary fact that the deliberate introduction of poisons into a reservoir is becoming a fairly common practice . . . The procedure has a strange, Alice-in-Wonderland quality”
  24. #78
    Nature’s creative power is far beyond man’s instinct of destruction.
  25. #79
    “The transformation of matter into energy in the cell is an ever-flowing process, one of nature’s cycles of renewal, like a wheel endlessly turning . . . one of the wonders of the living world”
  26. #80
    “The ‘control of nature’ is a phrase conceived in arrogance, born of the Neanderthal age of biology and the convenience of man.”
  27. #81
    “‘He’s telling you that living things don’t last - it’s all temporary. Death in life. That’s why they’re called natures mortes. Maybe you don’t see it at first with all the beauty and bloom, the little speck of rot. But if you look closer - there it is.’”
  1. #82
    “There’s the poor little mouse eating her nightly supper in the humble corner where I’ve put out a little delight-plate full of cheese and chocolate candy (for my days of killing mice are over).”
  2. #83
    ″‘You could be fire,’ Shallan said.
    ‘I am a stick.’
    The stick was not particularly eloquent.”
  3. #84
    “Nevertheless I go there every night even tho I don’t feel like it, it’s my duty (and probably drove me mad), and write these sea sounds, and all the whole insane poem ‘Sea.‘”
  4. #85
    “Pacific fury flashing on rocks that rise like gloomy sea shroud towers out of the cove, the bingbang cove with its seas booming inside caves and slapping out, the cities of seaweed floating up and down you can even see their dark leer in the phosphorescent seabeach nightlight.”
  5. #86
    “All kinds of strange and marvelous things like the weird Ripley situation of a huge tree that’s fallen across a creek maybe 500 years ago and’s made a bridge thereby.”
  6. #87
    “The way to solve the conflict between human values and technological needs is not to run away from technology. That’s impossible. The way to resolve the conflict is to break down the barriers of dualistic thought that prevent a real understanding of what technology is -not an exploitation of nature, but a fusion of nature and the human spirit into a new kind of creation that transcends both. When this transcendence occurs in such events as the first airplane flight across the ocean or the first footstep on the moon, a kind of public recognition of the transcendent nature of technology occurs. But this transcendence should also occur at the individual level, on a personal basis, in one’s own life, in a less dramatic way.”
  7. #88
    “If we lived close to nature in an agricultural society, the seasons as metaphor and fact would continually frame our lives. But the master metaphor of our era does not come from agriculture - it comes from manufacturing.”
  8. #89
    We shine like those fires and those stars; we sigh like those waves; we suffer like those great ships, which are worn out in ploughing the waves, in obeying the wind which urges them towards an end, as the breath of God blows us towards a port. Everything likes to live, Raoul; and everything is beautiful in living things.
  9. #90
    “A drowsy, dreamy influence seems to hang over the land, and to pervade the very atmosphere. Some say that the place was bewitched by a high German doctor, during the early days of the settlement; others, that an old Indian chief, the prophet or wizard of his tribe, held his powwows there before the country was discovered by Master Hendrick Hudson.”
  10. #91
    “It was, as I have said, a fine autumnal day, the sky was clear and serene, and nature wore that rich and golden livery which we always associate with the idea of abundance.”
  11. #92
    “To the Indians it seemed that these Europeans hated everything in nature - the living forests and their birds and beasts, the grassy grades, the water, the soil, the air itself.”
  12. #93
    “Faith does not need to push the river because faith is able to trust that there is a river. The river is flowing. We are in it.”
  13. #94
    “All this he saw, for one moment breathless and intense, vivid on the morning sky; and still, as he looked, he lived; and still, as he lived, he wondered.”
  14. #95
    “Nothing lives long
    Only the earth and mountains”
  15. #96
    “I was born upon the prairie, where the wind blew free and there was nothing to break the light of the sun. I was born where there are no enclosures and where everything drew a free breath. I want to die there and not within walls.
  16. #97
    “Nature’s first green is gold,
    Her hardest hue to hold.
    Her early leaf’s a flower;
    But only so an hour.
    Then leaf subsides to leaf.
    So Eden sank to grief,
    So dawn goes down to day.
    Nothing gold can stay.”
  17. #98
    “Mama used to tell Jaja and me that God was undecided about what to send, rain or sun. We would sit in our rooms and look out at the raindrops glinting with sunlight, waiting for God to decide.”
  18. #99
    “Some tale-tellers say the Beams saved it; others say they are the seeds of the world’s destruction. ”
  19. #100
    “That life - whatever else it is - is short. That fate is cruel but maybe not random. That Nature (meaning Death) always wins but that doesn’t mean we have to bow and grovel to it. That maybe even if we’re not always so glad to be here, it’s our task to immerse ourselves anyway: wade straight through it, right through the cesspool, while keeping eyes and hearts open. And in the midst of our dying, as we rise from the organic and sink back ignominiously into the organic, it is a glory and a privilege to love what Death doesn’t touch.”
  20. #101
    “Did u hear about the rose that grew from a crack
    in the concrete
    Proving nature’s laws wrong, it learned 2 walk
    without having feet
    Funny, it seems but by keeping its dreams
    it learned 2 breathe fresh air
    Long live the rose that grew from concrete
    when no one else even cared.”
  21. #102
    “Sudden and magnificent, the sun’s broad golden disc showed itself over the horizon facing them; and the first rays, shooting across the level water-meadows, took the animals full in the eyes and dazzled them. When they were able to look once more, the Vision had vanished, and the air was full of the carol of birds that hailed the dawn.”
  22. #103
    “The Buddha, the Godhead, resides quite as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain or in the petals of a flower.”
  23. #104
    ″‘Narnia, Narnia, Narnia, awake. Love. Think. Speak. Be walking trees. Be talking beasts. Be divine waters.‘”
  24. #105
    “A voice had begun to sing. It was very far away and Digory found it hard to decide from what direction it was coming. Sometimes it seemed to come from all directions at once. Sometimes he almost thought it was coming out of the earth beneath them. Its lower notes were deep enough to be the voice of the earth herself. There were no words. There was hardly even a tune. But it was, beyond comparison, the most beautiful noise he had ever heard.”
  25. #106
    “Though the things of nature are given in common, yet man, by being master of himself, and proprietor of his own person, and the actions or labour of it, had still in himself the great foundation of property; and that, which made up the great part of what he applied to the support or comfort of his being, when invention and arts had improved the conveniencies of life, was perfectly his own, and did not belong in common to others.”
  26. #107
    “I can only say that after living so long with the birds and animals, the movement of a human is like the difference between the explosion of a cap pistol and a cannon”
  27. #108
    “Frightful fluffed her nubby feathers and shook. I picked her up in the cup of my hands and held her under my chin.”

Books about nature

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The Secret Garden book
Chapter book
6.9
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The Boy Who Spoke to the Earth book
Picture book
6.8
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Good Night, World book
Board book
6.5
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Every Color of Light: A Book about the Sky book
Picture book
6.3
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Some Bugs book
Board book
6.3
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Mrs. Peanuckle's Bug Alphabet book
Board book
6.1
Add to list
The Nature Girls book
Picture book
6.0
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When Grandma Gives You a Lemon Tree book
Picture book
6.0
Add to list
  1. #109
    “I am well and healthy. The food is good. Sometimes I eat turtle soup, and I know how to make acorn pancakes. I keep my supplies in the wall of the tree in wooden pockets that I chopped myself.”
  2. #110
    “I knew that the land was just the place for a Gribley”
  3. #111
    “Nearby another one arose and there was a pop. Little bubbles of air snapped as these voiceless animals of the earth came to the surface. That got me to smiling. I was glad to know this about earthworms. I don’t know why but this seemed like one of the nicest things I had learned in the woods - that earthworms, lowly, confined to the darkness of the earth, could make just a little stir in the world”
  4. #112
    “I could hear the voices of the other people.They filled my silent mountain”
  5. #113
    “The lamp l am writing by is deer fat poured into a turtle shell with a strip of my old city trousers for a wick.”
  6. #114
    “I looked through the clear water and saw the tracks of mussels in the mud. I ran along the log back to shore, took off my clothes, and plunged into that icy water. I collected almost a peck of mussels in very little time.”
  7. #115
    “I must have walked a mile into the woods until I found a stream. It was a clear athletic stream that rushed and ran and jumped and splashed.”
  8. #116
    “Before the appropriation of land, he who gathered as much of the wild fruit, killed, caught, or tamed, as many of the beasts, as he could; he that so imployed his pains about any of the spontaneous products of nature, as any way to alter them from the state which nature put them in, by placing any of his labour on them, did thereby acquire a propriety in them: but if they perished, in his possession, without their due use; if the fruits rotted, or the venison putrified, before he could spend it, he offended against the common law of nature, and was liable to be punished; he invaded his neighbour’s share, for he had no right, farther than his use called for any of them, and they might serve to afford him conveniencies of life.”
  9. #117
    “See that falcon? Hear those white-throated sparrows? Smell that skunk? Well, the falcon takes the sky, the white-throated sparrow takes the low bushes, the skunk takes the earth...I take the woods.”
  10. #118
    “Fortunately, the sun has a wonderfully glorious habit of rising every morning. When the sky lightened, when the birds awoke, I knew I would never again see anything so splendid as the round red sun coming up over the earth.”
  11. #119
    “Bigwig was right when he said he wasn’t like a rabbit at all,” said Holly. “He was a fighting animal—fierce as a rat or a dog. He fought because he actually felt safer fighting than running. He was brave, all right. But it wasn’t natural; and that’s why it was bound to finish him in the end. He was trying to do something that Frith never meant any rabbit to do. I believe he’d have hunted like the elil if he could.”
  12. #120
    “Here and there one sat upright on an ant heap and looked about, with ears erect and nose in the wind. But a blackbird, singing undisturbed on the outskirts of the wood, showed that there was nothing alarming there, and in the other direction, along the brook, all was plain to be seen, empty and quiet. The warren was at peace.”
  13. #121
    On the Big Blackfoot River above the mouth of Belmont Creek the banks are fringed by large Ponderosa pines. In the slanting sun of late afternoon the shadows of great branches reached from across the river, and the trees took the river in their arms. The shadows continued up the bank, until they included us.
  14. #122
    “The earth is speaking to us, but we can’t hear because of all the racket our senses are making. Sometimes we need to erase them, erase our senses. Then–maybe-the earth will touch us. The universe will speak. The stars will whisper.”
  15. #123
    Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! Rage, blow!
    You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
    Till you have drenched our steeples, drowned the cocks.
    You sulph’rous and thought-executing fires,
    Vaunt-couriers of oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
    Singe my white head.
  16. #124
    “Men aren’t naturally good; but girls are.”
  17. #125
    ″‘All this--’ she exclaimed, the sweep of her arm including the deepening blue of the sky, the shining lake in the distance, the snow-covered mountain far to the north. ‘So much! You must look at it all, Daniel, not just at the unhappy things.‘”
  18. #126
    “A passive life of enjoyment affords . . . [man] the opportunity to obtain fulfillment in experiencing beauty, art, or nature.”
  19. #127
    “Under normal circumstances, Ronnie probably would have appreciated an evening like this. In New York, the lights from the city made it impossible to see many stars, but here, it was just the opposite.”
  20. #128
    “In a Word, The Nature and Experience of Things dictated to me upon just Reflection, That all the good Things of this World, are no farther good to us, than they are for our Use; and that whatever we may heap up indeed to give others, we enjoy just as much as we can use, and more.”
  21. #129
    “Most of the time I am sunk in thought, but at some point on each walk there comes a moment when I look up and notice, with a kind of first-time astonishment, the amazing complex delicacy of the words, the casual ease with which elemental things come together to form a composition that is-whatever the season, wherever I put my besotted gaze-perfect.”
  22. #130
    “I could see an old and beautiful olive tree just up ahead. ”
  23. #131
    “I wanted to quit and to do this forever, sleep in a bed and in a tent, see what was over the next hill and never see a hill again. All of this all at once, every moment, on the trail or off.”
  24. #132
    “If there’s one thing the AT teaches, it is low-level ecstasy-something we could all do with more of in our lives.”
  25. #133
    “He must master or be mastered; while to show mercy was a weakness. Mercy did not exist in the primordial life. It was misunderstood for fear, and such misunderstandings made for death. Kill or be killed, eat or be eaten, was the law; and this mandate, down out of the depths of Time, he obeyed.”
  26. #134
    “My ten friends had been told, not since 1939 but since 1933, that their nation was fighting for its life. They believed that self-preservation is the first law of nature, of the nature of nations as well as of herd brutes.”
  27. #135
    “Here was neither peace, nor rest, nor a moment’s safety. All was confusion and action, and every moment life and limb were in peril.”
  1. #136
    “Buck’s first day . . . was like a nightmare. Every hour was filled with shock and suprirse. He had been suddenly jerked from the heart of civilization and flung into the heart of things primordial.”
  2. #137
    “The lover of nature is he whose inward and outward senses are still truly adjusted to each other; who has retained the spirit of infancy even into the era of manhood.”
  3. #138
    “In the woods too, a man casts off his years, as the snake his slough, and at what period soever of life, is always a child. In the woods, is perpetual youth.”
  4. #139
    “An illusion has three stages. First there is the setup, in which the nature of what might be attempted at is hinted at, or suggested, or explained.”
  5. #140
    “Saturday morning was come, and all the summer world was bright and fresh, and brimming with life. There was a song in every heart . . . There was cheer in every face and a spring in every step. The locust trees were in bloom and the fragrance of the blossoms filled the air.”
  6. #141
    “There was not even a zephyr stirring; the dead noonday heat had even stilled the songs of the birds; nature lay in a trance that was broken by no sound but the occasional far-off hammering of a woodpecker, and this seemed to render the pervading silence and sense of loneliness the more profound. The boy’s soul was steeped in melancholy; his feelings were in happy accord with his surroundings.”
  7. #142
    “How sweet the morning air is! See how that one little cloud floats like a pink feather from some gigantic flamingo. Now the red rim of the sun pushes itself over the London cloud-bank. It shines on a good many folk, but on none, I dare bet, who are on a stranger errand than you and I. How small we feel with our petty ambitions and strivings in the presence of the great elemental forces of Nature!”
  8. #143
    “Throw a stone into the stream and the ripples that propagate themselves are the beautiful type of all influence.”
  9. #144
    “Every natural action is graceful.”
  10. #145
    “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
    Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
    Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
    And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
    Sometimes too hot the eye of heaven shines,
    And too often is his gold complexion dimm’d:
    And every fair from fair sometimes declines,
    By chance or natures changing course untrimm’d;
    By thy eternal summer shall not fade,
    Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
    Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
    When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
    So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
    So long lives this and this gives life to thee.”
  11. #146
    “Roads go ever ever on,
    Over rock and under tree,
    By caves where never sun has shone,
    By streams that never find the sea;”
  12. #147
    “Pleasure is Nature’s test, her sign of approval. When we are happy, we are always good, but when we are good, we are not always happy.”
  13. #148
    “Whose woods these are I think I know
    His house is in the village though;
    He will not see me stopping here
    To watch his woods fill up with snow.”
  14. #149
    “Nature’s first green is gold,
    Her hardest hue to hold.”
  15. #150
    “So Eden sank to grief,
    So dawn goes down to day.
    Nothing gold can stay.”
  16. #151
    “Next to nothing for weight,
    And since they grew duller
    From contact with earth,
    Next to nothing for color.”
  17. #152
    “Next to nothing for use.
    But a crop is a crop,
    And who’s to say where
    The harvest shall stop?”
  18. #153
    “It’s amazing the difference
    A bit of sky can make.”
  19. #154
    “Here’s harmony!” said she; “here’s repose! Here’s what may leave all painting and all music behind, and what poetry only can attempt to describe! Here’s what may tranquilize every care, and lift the heart to rapture! When I look out on such a night as this, I feel as if there could be neither wickedness nor sorrow in the world; and there certainly would be less of both if the sublimity of Nature were more attended to, and people were carried more out of themselves by contemplating such a scene.”
  20. #155
    “Looking to the mountains around us, I saw that the mysterious artist who comes at night had paid us a visit. I wondered how he could paint so many different colors in one night; red, wine, yellow, and rust.”
  21. #156
    We may brave human laws, but we cannot resist natural ones.
  22. #157
    “His life was gentle; and the elements
    So mix’d in him that Nature might stand up
    And say to all the world, ‘This was a man!‘”
  23. #158
    “O how beautiful, look at the crimson snow! And up there on the rocks there are ever so many roses!”
  24. #159
    “It’s better to look at the sky than live there. Such an empty place; so vague. Just a country where the thunder goes and things disappear.”
  25. #160
    “We need the tonic of wildness...At the same time that we are earnest to explore and learn all things, we require that all things be mysterious and unexplorable, that land and sea be indefinitely wild, unsurveyed and unfathomed by us because unfathomable. We can never have enough of nature.”
  26. #161
    “Let us first be as simple and well as Nature ourselves, dispel the clouds which hang over our brows, and take up a little life into our pores. Do not stay to be an overseer of the poor, but endeavor to become one of the worthies of the world.”
  27. #162
    “She was fond of seeing great crowds and large stretches of country.”
  1. #163
    As for Phileas Fogg, it seemed just as if the typhoon were a part of his programme.
  2. #164
    “Hill. Yes, that was it. But it is a hasty word for a thing that has stood here ever since this part of the world was shaped.”
  3. #165
    “Indeed I have not seen them roused like this for many an age. We Ents do not like being roused; and we never are roused unless it is clear to us that our trees and our lives are in great danger.”
  4. #166
    “Are God and Nature then at strife,
    That Nature lends such evil dreams?
    So careful of the type she seems,
    So careless of the single life”
  5. #167
    “Pearl resembled the brook, inasmuch as the current of her life gushed from a wellspring as mysterious, and had flown through scenes shadowed as heavily with gloom. But, unlike the little stream, she danced and sparkled and prattled airily along her course.”
  6. #168
    “This world... belongs to the strong, my friend! The ritual of our existence is based on the strong getting stronger by devouring the weak. We must face up to this. No more than right that it should be this way. We must learn to accept it as a law of the natural world. The rabbits accept their role in the ritual and recognize the wolf as the strong. In defense, the rabbit becomes sly and frightened and elusive and he digs holes and hides when the wolf is about. And he endures, he goes on. He knows his place. He most certainly doesn’t challenge the wolf to combat. Now, would that be wise? Would it?”
  7. #169
    “Man selects only for his own good: Nature only for that of the being which she tends.”
  8. #170
    “The rabbits became strange in many ways, different from other rabbits. They knew well enough what was happening. But even to themselves they pretended that all was well, for the food was good, they were protected, they had nothing to fear but the one fear; and that struck here and there, never enough at a time to drive them away. They forgot the ways of wild rabbits. They forgot El-ahrairah, for what use had they for tricks and cunning, living in the enemy’s warren and paying his price?”
  9. #171
    “El-ahrairah, your people cannot rule the world, for I will not have it so. All the world will be your enemy, Prince with a Thousand Enemies, and whenever they catch you, they will kill you. But first they must catch you, digger, listener, runner, prince with the swift warning. Be cunning and full of tricks and your people shall never be destroyed.”
  10. #172
    “She was stretched on her back beneath the pear tree soaking in the alto chant of the visiting bees, the gold of the sun and the panting breath of the breeze when the inaudible voice of it all came to her. She saw a dust-bearing bee sink into the sanctum of a bloom; the thousand sister-calyxes arch to meet the love embrace and the ecstatic shiver of the tree from root to tiniest branch creaming in every blossom and frothing with delight. So this was a marriage! She had been summoned to behold a revelation. Then Janie felt a pain remorseless sweet that left her limp and languid.”
  11. #173
    “He spoke very well about the decency and comradeship natural to animals. ‘Animals don’t behave like men,’ he said. ‘If they have to fight, they fight; and if they have to kill they kill. But they don’t sit down and set their wits to work to devise ways of spoiling other creatures’ lives and hurting them. They have dignity and animality.‘”
  12. #174
    ″“Do you like it?” asked Strawberry.
    Hazel puzzled over the stones. They were all the same size, and pushed at regular intervals into the soil. He could make nothing of them.
    “What are they for?” he asked again.”
  13. #175
    At sunrise, everything is luminous but not clear.
  14. #176
    Bigwig and Hawkbit chased each other through the long grass. Speedwell jumped over the little brook that ran down the middle of the field and when Acorn tried to follow him and fell short, Silver joked with him as he scrambled out and rolled him in a patch of dead oak leaves until he was dry. As the sun rose higher, shortening the shadows and drawing the dew from the grass, most of the rabbits came wandering back to the sun-flecked shade among the cow parsley along the edge of the ditch. Here, Hazel and Fiver were sitting with Dandelion under a flowering wild cherry. The white petals spun down around them, covering the grass and speckling their fur, while thirty feet above a thrush sang, “Cherry dew, cherry dew. Knee deep, knee deep, knee deep.”″
  15. #177
    Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it. The river was cut by the world’s great flood and runs over rocks from the basement of time. On some of those rocks are timeless raindrops. Under the rocks are the words, and some of the words are theirs.
  16. #178
    “To rabbits, everything unknown is dangerous. The first reaction is to startle, the second to bolt. Again and again they startled, until they were close to exhaustion. But what did these sounds mean and where, in this wilderness, could they bolt to?”
  17. #179
    Not far downstream was a dry channel where the river had run once, and part of the way to come to know a thing is through its death. But years ago I had known the river when it flowed through this now dry channel, so I could enliven its stony remains with the waters of memory.
  18. #180
    “Jurassic Park is not the real world. It is intended to be a controlled world that only imitates the natural world.”
  19. #181
    “She was amazed that it would come so close, but she remembered that this was a national park. All the animals in the park would know that they are protected.”
  20. #182
    “Deep in the forest a call was sounding, and as often as he heard this call, mysteriously thrilling and luring, he felt compelled to turn his back upon the fire and the beaten earth around it, and to plunge into the forest, and on and on, he knew not where or why; nor did he wonder where or why, the call sounding imperiously, deep in the forest. But as often as he gained the soft unbroken earth and the green shade, the love for John Thornton drew him back to the fire again.”
  21. #183
    “That was the way. No fair play. Once down, that was the end of you.”
  22. #184
    “For the little hut was still standing in spite of the winter storms and snow. The moss was greener than ever, and primroses, windflowers and wild cherry brightened all the forest. The Ordinary Princess, who had once been an ordinary kitchen maid and was now Queen Amethyst of Ambergeldar, wore Clorinda’s ragged dress, which she had most carefully mended, and cooked the brown trout that Peregrine—who was always Peregrine—caught in the forest streams for their dinner.”
  23. #185
    “Beyond the house was a large field for the children to play in, and beyond the field were woods that went on damn near forever.”
  24. #186
    “And once again it seemed to the Ordinary Princess as though the sky had fallen into the Forest of Faraway, as she lay on her back in a sea of bluebells and watched a pair of orioles building their nest in the branches over her head.”
  25. #187
    “A transition was about to be completed: the sun was crossing the zenith to a winter place in the sky, a place where prayers of long winter nights would call out the long summer days of new growth. Tonight the old priests would be praying for the force to continue the relentless motion of the stars.”
  26. #188
    “We watched the sea move around. It was dead, but colorful.
    It was blue when the sun hit it one way, and purple when the sun hit it another way, and sometimes yellow or green. We had on suits so we wouldn’t smell it.”
  27. #189
    “Civilized women are, therefore, so weakened by false refinement, that, respecting morals, their condition is much below what it would be were they left in a state nearer to nature.”
  1. #190
    “She told me about the scales on butterflies, and the way animals lived in ducts, sometimes whole herds. People would hear the stampeding through their walls. There were new kinds of fungus, she said, that were making jungles where the cables ran. There were slugs so big a toddler could ride them sidesaddle. ‘The natural world is so adaptable,’ she said. ‘So adaptable you wonder what’s natural.‘”
  2. #191
    “Nature, in these respects, may safely be left to herself; let women only acquire knowledge and humanity, and love will teach them modesty.”
  3. #192
    “Don’t believe tree-huggers who claim that our ancestors lived in harmony with nature.”
  4. #193
    “Exploration is in our nature. We began as wanderers, and we are wanderers still. We have lingered long enough on the shores of the cosmic ocean. We are ready at last to set sail for the stars.”
  5. #194
    “It was November--the month of crimson sunsets, parting birds, deep, sad hymns of the sea, passionate wind-songs in the pines. Anne roamed through the pineland alleys in the park and, as she said, let that great sweeping wind blow the fogs out of her soul.”
  6. #195
    “That is the way leaves fall around a tree in autumn, a tree unaware of the rain running down its sides, of the sun or the frost, and of life gradually retreating inward. The tree does not die. It waits.”
  7. #196
    “Is not the sky a father and the earth a mother, and are not all living things with feet or wings or roots their children?”
  8. #197
    “If you should rear a duck in the heart of the Sahara, no doubt it would swim if you brought it to the Nile.”
  9. #198
    “It is from understanding that power comes; and the power in the ceremony was in understanding what it meant; for nothing can live well except in a manner that is suited to the way the sacred Power of the World lives and moves.”
  10. #199
    “The nature of the criminal justice system has changed. It is no longer primarily concerned with the prevention and punishment of crime, but rather with the management and control of the dispossessed.”
  11. #200
    “It is the story of all life that is holy and good to tell, and of us two-leggeds sharing in it with the four-leggeds and the wings of the air and of green things; for these are children of one mother and their father is one Spirit.”
  12. #201
    “He who grasps the truth of the Mental Nature of the Universe is well advanced on The Path to Mastery.”
  13. #202
    ″...A new life begins today for Harvey Dent. Dent, a former district attorney became obsessed with the number two when half his face was scarred by acid. Dent believe his disfiguration revealed a hidden, evil side to his nature. He adopted as his personal symbol a dollar coin...”
  14. #203
    “I can remember when the bison were so many that they could not be counted, but more and more Wasichus came to kill them until there were only heaps and heaps of bones scattered where they used to be. The Wasichus did not kill them to eat; they killed them for the metal that makes them crazy, and they took only the hides to sell. Sometimes they did not even take the hides to sell. Sometimes they did not even take the hides, only the tongues; […] they just killed and killed because they liked to do that. When we hunted bison, we killed only what we needed. And when there was nothing left but heaps of bones, the Wasichus came and gathered up even the bones and sold them.”
  15. #204
    “A person whose desires and impulses are his own- are the expression of his own nature, as it has been developed and modified by his own culture- is said to have character.”
  16. #205
    “But only crazy or very foolish men would sell their Mother Earth. Sometimes I think it might have been better if we had stayed together and made them kill us all.”
  17. #206
    “On the barren shore, and on the lofty ice barrier in the background, myriads of grotesque penguins squawked and flapped their fins; while many fat seals were visible on the water, swimming or sprawling across large cakes of slowly drifting ice.”
  18. #207
    “The last lap of the voyage was vivid and fancy-stirring, great barren peaks of mystery looming up constantly against the west as the low northern sun of noon or the still lower horizon-grazing southern sun of midnight poured its hazy reddish rays over the white snow, bluish ice and water lanes, and black bits of exposed granite slope.”
  19. #208
    “No one is able to attain the truth adequately, while, on the other hand, no one fails entirely, but everyone says something true about the nature of all things, and while individually they contribute little or nothing to the truth, by the union of all a considerable amount is amassed.”
  20. #209
    “The things you fear are undefeatable, not by their nature, but by your approach. ”
  21. #210
    “I would like to hold your hand as it holds this green leaf, yellowed, that fell early from its tree, this Autumn. And I would like to imagine that it feels your careful care, for your eyes are warmed by your heart, and I would let you sadly nestle into me as a bird folds into its nest, resigning itself to a storm.”
  22. #211
    “By its very nature every embodied spirit is doomed to suffer and enjoy in solitude. Sensations, feelings, insights, fancies - all these are private and, except through symbols and at second hand, incommunicable.”
  23. #212
    “Above, the stars shone hard and bright, sparks struck off the dark skin of the universe.”
  24. #213
    “My parents found a lovely place in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania. [...] This beautiful place became my real discovery of nature. My emphasis on biology and nature and the body in my writing about myth comes out of those years.”
  25. #214
    “In those hours he is awake and prowling through the building, he sometimes feels he is a demon who has disguised himself as a human, and only at night is it safe to shed the costume he must wear by daylight, and indulge his true nature.”
  26. #215
    “The need for punishment without torture was ... formulated as a cry from the heart or ... from an outraged nature.”
  27. #216
    “Filmmakers understandably love footage of gore and battle, but any naturalist will tell you that the species are not in any sense at war with one another.”
  28. #217
    “The gazelle and the lion are enemies only in the minds of the Takers. The lion that comes across a herd of gazelles doesn’t massacre them, as an enemy would. It kills one, not to satisfy its hatred of gazelles but to satisfy its hunger, and once it has made its kill the gazelles are perfectly content to go on grazing with the lion right in their midst.”
  29. #218
    “Every night I come to the same place and wait until the sky catches up with my mood.”
  30. #219
    “We’re not destroying the world because we’re clumsy. We’re destroying the world because we are, in a very literal and deliberate way, at war with it.”
  31. #220
    “The story the Takers have been enacting here for the past ten thousand years is not only disastrous for mankind and for the world, it’s fundamentally unhealthy and unsatisfying. It’s a megalomaniac’s fantasy, and enacting it has given the Takers a culture riddled with greed, cruelty, mental illness, crime and drug addiction.”
  32. #221
    “What does it matter that I’m weary of living as a murderer of all the life around me? I know good and evil, and this way of living is good. Therefore I must live this way even though I’m weary unto death, even though I destroy the world and even myself.”
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