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Nature Quotes

40 of the best book quotes about nature
  1. #1
    “Before man came to blow it right
    The wind once blew itself untaught,
    And did its loudest day and night
    In any rough place where it caught.”
  2. #2
    “Looking to the mountains around us, I saw that the mysterious artist who comes at night had paid us a visit. I wondered how he could paint so many different colors in one night; red, wine, yellow, and rust.”
  3. #3
    “Lord Henry went out to the garden and found Dorian Gray burying his face in the great cool lilac-blossoms, feverishly drinking in their perfume as if it had been wine. He came close to him and put his hand upon his shoulder. ‘You are quite right to do that,’ he murmured. ‘Nothing can cure the soul but the senses, just as nothing can cure the senses but the soul.‘”
  4. #4
    “And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.”
  5. #5
    “From a caprice of nature, not from the ignorance of man. Not a mistake has been made in the working. But we cannot prevent equilibrium from producing its effects. We may brave human laws, but we cannot resist natural ones.”
  6. #6
    “I had an inheritance from my father,
    It was the moon and the sun.
    And though I roam all over the world,
    The spending of it’s never done.”
  7. #7
    The earth had donned her mantle of brightest green; and shed her richest perfumes abroad. It was the prime and vigour of the year; all things were glad and flourishing.
  8. #8
    The earth had donned her mantle of brightest green; and shed her richest perfumes abroad. It was the prime and vigour of the year; all things were glad and flourishing.
  1. #9
    It’s amazing the difference
    A bit of sky can make.
  2. #10
    “She knew the years of isolation had altered her behavior until she was different from others, but it wasn’t her fault she’d been alone. Most of what she knew, she’d learned from the wild. Nature had nurtured, tutored, and protected her when no one else would.”
  3. #11
    “But I am done with apple-picking now.
    Essence of winter sleep is on the night,
    The scent of apples: I am drowsing off.”
  4. #12
    “Next to nothing for use.
    But a crop is a crop,
    And who’s to say where
    The harvest shall stop?”
  5. #13
    “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
    Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
    Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
    And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
    Sometimes too hot the eye of heaven shines,
    And too often is his gold complexion dimm’d:
    And every fair from fair sometimes declines,
    By chance or natures changing course untrimm’d;
    By thy eternal summer shall not fade,
    Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
    Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
    When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
    So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
    So long lives this and this gives life to thee.”
  6. #14
    “Nature is a haunted house--but Art--is a house that tries to be haunted.”
  7. #15
    “Every natural action is graceful.”
  8. #16
    “Throw a stone into the stream and the ripples that propagate themselves are the beautiful type of all influence.”
  1. #17
    “His life was gentle; and the elements
    So mix’d in him that Nature might stand up
    And say to all the world, ‘This was a man!‘”
  2. #18
    “Roads go ever ever on,
    Over rock and under tree,
    By caves where never sun has shone,
    By streams that never find the sea;”
  3. #19
    “Do you understand this feeling? This breeze, which has traveled from the regions towards which I am advancing, gives me a foretaste of those icy climes. Inspirited by this wind of promise, my daydreams become more fervent and vivid. I try in vain to be persuaded that the pole is the seat of frost and desolation; it ever presents itself to my imagination as the region of beauty and delight. There, Margaret, the sun is forever visible, its broad disk just skirting the horizon and diffusing a perpetual splendour.”
  4. #20
    We may brave human laws, but we cannot resist natural ones.
  5. #21
    “The desert sharpened the sweet ache of his longing, amplified it, gave shape to it in sere geology and clean slant of light.”
  6. #22
    “There was not even a zephyr stirring; the dead noonday heat had even stilled the songs of the birds; nature lay in a trance that was broken by no sound but the occasional far-off hammering of a woodpecker, and this seemed to render the pervading silence and sense of loneliness the more profound. The boy’s soul was steeped in melancholy; his feelings were in happy accord with his surroundings.”
  7. #23
    “Sometimes she heard night-sounds she didn’t know or jumped from lightning too close, but whenever she stumbled, it was the land who caught her. Until at last, at some unclaimed moment, the heart-pain seeped away like water into sand. Still there, but deep. Kya laid her hand upon the breathing, wet earth, and the marsh became her mother.”
  8. #24
    “I’d like to go by climbing a birch tree,
    And climb black branches up a snow-white trunk
    Toward heaven, till the tree could bear no more,
    But dipped its top and set me down again.
    That would be good both going and coming back.
    One could do worse than be a swinger of birches.”
  1. #25
    “When I see birches bend to left and right
    Across the lines of straighter darker trees,
    I like to think some boy’s been swinging them.”
  2. #26
    “Nature’s first green is gold,
    Her hardest hue to hold.”
  3. #27
    “Whose woods these are I think I know
    His house is in the village though;
    He will not see me stopping here
    To watch his woods fill up with snow.”
  4. #28
    “Pleasure is Nature’s test, her sign of approval. When we are happy, we are always good, but when we are good, we are not always happy.”
  5. #29
    “The city had withdrawn into itself
    And left at last the country to the country;”
  6. #30
    “To sit in the shade on a fine day, and look upon verdure, is the most perfect refreshment.”
  7. #31
    “Here’s harmony!” said she; “here’s repose! Here’s what may leave all painting and all music behind, and what poetry only can attempt to describe! Here’s what may tranquilize every care, and lift the heart to rapture! When I look out on such a night as this, I feel as if there could be neither wickedness nor sorrow in the world; and there certainly would be less of both if the sublimity of Nature were more attended to, and people were carried more out of themselves by contemplating such a scene.”
  8. #32
    “My long scythe whispered and left the hay to make.”
  1. #33
    “Saturday morning was come, and all the summer world was bright and fresh, and brimming with life. There was a song in every heart . . . There was cheer in every face and a spring in every step. The locust trees were in bloom and the fragrance of the blossoms filled the air.”
  2. #34
    “So Eden sank to grief,
    So dawn goes down to day.
    Nothing gold can stay.”
  3. #35
    “There was something rather blousy about roses in full bloom, something shallow and raucous, like women with untidy hair”
  4. #36
    “Do you remember what Darwin says about music? He claims that the power of producing and appreciating it existed among the human race long before the power of speech was arrived at. Perhaps that is why we are so subtly influenced by it. There are vague memories in our souls of those misty centuries when the world was in its childhood.′
    That’s a rather broad idea,′ I remarked.
    One’s ideas must be as broad as Nature if they are to interpret Nature,′ he answered.”
  5. #37
    Nature’s creative power is far beyond man’s instinct of destruction.
  6. #38
    “Next to nothing for weight,
    And since they grew duller
    From contact with earth,
    Next to nothing for color.”
  7. #39
    “How sweet the morning air is! See how that one little cloud floats like a pink feather from some gigantic flamingo. Now the red rim of the sun pushes itself over the London cloud-bank. It shines on a good many folk, but on none, I dare bet, who are on a stranger errand than you and I. How small we feel with our petty ambitions and strivings in the presence of the great elemental forces of Nature!”
  8. #40
    “The way a crow
    Shook down on me
    The dust of snow
    From a hemlock tree
    Has given my heart
    A change of mood
    And saved some part
    Of a day I had rued.”
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