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ignorance Quotes

69 of the best book quotes about ignorance
  1. #1
    “People worry about kids playing with guns, and teenagers watching violent videos; we are scared that some sort of culture or violence will take them over. Nobody worries about kids listening to thousands - literally thousands - of songs about broken hearts and rejection and pain and misery and loss. ”
  2. #2
    “What shall we do if we take ignorance to be knowledge?”
  3. #3
    “For in the end, [Huxley] was trying to tell us what afflicted the people in ‘Brave New World’ was not that they were laughing instead of thinking, but that they did not know what they were laughing about and why they had stopped thinking.”
  4. #4
    “My father wanted us to be inspired by our great hero, but in a manner fit for our times - with pens, not swords. Just as Khattak had wanted the Pashtuns to unite against a foreign enemy, so we needed to unite against ignorance.”
  5. #5
    “After leaving their bodies, they who have killed the Self go to the worlds of the Asuras, covered with blinding ignorance.”
  6. #6
    “They enter into blind darkness who worship Avidya (ignorance and delusion); they fall, as it were, into greater darkness who worship Vidya (knowledge).”
  7. #7
    “Children (the ignorant) pursue external pleasures; (thus) they fall into the wide-spread snare of death. But the wise, knowing the nature of immortality, do not seek the permanent among fleeting things.”
  8. #8
    “Fools dwelling in ignorance, yet imagining themselves wise and learned, go round and round in crooked ways, like the blind led by the blind.”
  9. #9
    “The Rabbit could not claim to be a model of anything, for he didn’t know that real rabbits existed; he thought they were all stuffed with sawdust like himself, and he understood that sawdust was quite out-of-date and should never be mentioned in modern circles.”
  1. #10
    “I can tell you that ‘Just cheer up’ is almost universally looked at as the most unhelpful depression cure ever. It’s pretty much the equivalent of telling someone who just had their legs amputated to ‘just walk it off.’ ”
  2. #11
    Don’t search for the answers, which could not be given to you now, because you would not be able to live them.
  3. #12
    “You’ve always been a tourist here, you just didn’t know it.”
  4. #13
    “People want to ignore what they can’t understand. They’re looking for logic at any cost.”
  5. #14
    “In her month and a half of turbulent motherhood, Bebe did not once seek help from a psychologist or a doctor... she had no idea where to turn... She did not know how to find the social workers who might have helped her... she did not know how to file for welfare.”
  6. #15
    “I was born a slave; but I never knew it till six years of happy childhood had passed away.”
  7. #16
    “She may be an ignorant creature, degraded by the system that has brutalized her from her childhood; but she has a mother’s instincts, and is capable of a mother’s agonies.”
  8. #17
    “She was ‘nervous,’ she suffered ‘little spells’—such were the sheltering expressions used by those close to her. Not that the truth concerning ‘poor Bonnie’s afflictions’ was in the least a secret; everyone knew she had been an on-and-off psychiatric patient the last half-dozen years.”
  9. #18
    “Unfortunately, the sort of individual who is programmed to […] keep pushing for the top is frequently programmed to disregard signs of grave and imminent danger as well.”

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The Rag Coat book
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Three Little Words book
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The Trumpet of the Swan book
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All the Places to Love book
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Penguin and Pinecone book
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Spot Loves His Daddy book
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Wherever You Are book
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  1. #19
    “He said, ‘Ignorance and power and pride are a deadly mixture, you know’
    ‘Sure are,’ I said. ‘Like matches in the hand of a three-year-old. Or automobiles in the hands of a sixteen-year-old. Or faith in God in the mind of a saint or a maniac. Or a nuclear arsenal in the hands of a movie character. Or even jumper cables and batteries in the hands of fools.‘”
  2. #20
    “Sitting there watching the laundry go around in the dryer, I thought about the round world and hygiene. We’ve made a lot of progress, you know. We used to think that disease was an act of God. Then we figured out it was a product of human ignorance, so we’ve been cleaning up our act-literally-ever since. We’ve been getting the excrement off our hands and clothes and bodies and food and houses”
  3. #21
    “You think we’ve got the handle on reality, just ’cause we can record bits of it. More to it than that, pal. More to it than that.”
  4. #22
    “The Devon faculty had never before experienced a student who combined a calm ignorance of the rules with a winning urge to be good, who seemed to love the school truly and deeply, and never more than when he was breaking the regulations […]. The faculty threw up its hands over Phineas, and so loosened its grip on all of us.”
  5. #23
    “Every bad man is ignorant what he ought to do and what to leave undone, and by reason of such error men become unjust and wholly evil.”
  6. #24
    To say that the Force works in mysterious ways is to admit one’s ignorance, for any mystery can be solved through the application of knowledge and unrelenting effort.
  7. #25
    “They who have received some portion of God’s gift, these, if judged by their deeds, have from death’s bond won their release; for they embrace in their own mind, all things, things on the earth, things in the heaven, and things above the heaven - if there be aught. They who do not understand, because they possess the aid of reason only and not mind, are ignorant wherefore they have come into being and whereby, like irrational creatures, their makeup is in their feelings and their impulses, they fail in all appreciation of things which really are worth contemplation. These center all their thought upon the pleasures of the body and its appetites.”
  8. #26
    “So she had passed her childhood, like a half-wild cat.”
  9. #27
    “They are Man’s . . . And they cling to me, appealing from their fathers. This boy is Ignorance. This girl is Want. Beware them both, and all of their degree, but most of all beware this boy, for on his brow I see that written which is Doom, unless the writing be erased.”
  1. #28
    “You see, I haven’t really thought very much. I was always afraid of what I might think—so it seemed safer not to think at all. But now I know. A thought is like a child inside our body. It has to be born. If it dies inside you, part of you dies too!”
  2. #29
    “The freedom now desired by many is not freedom to do and dare but freedom from care and worry.”
  3. #30
    “From a caprice of nature, not from the ignorance of man. Not a mistake has been made in the working. But we cannot prevent equilibrium from producing its effects. We may brave human laws, but we cannot resist natural ones.”
  4. #31
    “She had taught me to disdain the blend of ignorance and arrogance that too often characterized Americans abroad.”
  5. #32
    “It would create a feeling that is extremely uncomfortable, called cognitive dissonance. And because it is so important to protect the core belief, they will rationalize, ignore and even deny anything that doesn’t fit in with the core belief.”
  6. #33
    “I am not a Polack. People from Poland are Poles, not Polacks. But what I am is a one hundred percent American, born and raised in the greatest country on earth and proud as hell of it, so don’t ever call me a Polack.”
  7. #34
    “Some towns … want to talk about what happened, about the past. Other towns, discussion of the past is discouraged. We went to a place once where the children didn’t know the world had ever been different, although you’d think all the rusted-out automobiles and telephones wires would give them a clue.”
  8. #35
    “Becoming free from the clutches of ignorance is not as simple as learning about its cause. Even if you are honest and truly believe in the philosophy of yoga and mystical spirituality, all of your mental efforts to negate the ignorance will fail in the beginning.”
  9. #36
    “I do not approve of anything that tampers with natural ignorance. Ignorance is like a delicate exotic fruit; touch it and the bloom is gone.”

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Freedom Bird: A Tale of Hope and Courage book
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Tiger Wild book
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Moon book
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  1. #37
    “He’d always thought they’d go home one day and everything would be like it was before they came . . . he didn’t understand that there was no going back, that what had happened was forever.”
  2. #38
    “We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.”
  3. #39
    “Sometimes people never even ask my name, like it’s not important or something. It is. My name is Melody.”
  4. #40
    “Where my culture I’m told holds no significance
    I’ll wither and die in ignorance
    But my inner eye can c a race
    who reigned as kings in another place”
  5. #41
    “The most merciful thing in the world, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.”
  6. #42
    “Deceitfulness, and arrogance, and pride,
    Quickness to anger, harsh and evil speech,
    And ignorance, to its own darkness blind,--
    These be the signs, My Prince! of him whose birth
    Is fated for the regions of the vile.”
  7. #43
    “Ignorance, begot
    Of Darkness, blinding mortal men, binds down
    Their souls to stupor, sloth, and drowsiness.”
  8. #44
    “if only we were crazy enough to be willing to ignore our mechanical and static perceptions we’d know that a half-filled coffee cup holds more secrets than, say, the Grand Canyon.”
  9. #45
    “It’s clear to me now that I have been moving toward you and you toward me for a long time. Though neither of us was aware of the other before we met, there was a kind of mindless certainty bumming blithely along beneath our ignorance that ensured we would come together.”
  1. #46
    “The atmosphere of the home is prolonged in the school, where the students soon discover that (as in the home) in order to achieve some satisfaction they must adapt to the precepts which have been set from above. One of these precepts is not to think”.
  2. #47
    “But who is more ignorant? The man who cannot define lightning, or the man who does not respect its awesome power?”
  3. #48
    “Is that how we lived, then? But we lived as usual. Everyone does, most of the time. Whatever is going on is as usual. Even this is as usual, now.
    We lived, as usual, by ignoring. Ignoring isn’t the same as ignorance, you have to work at it. ”
  4. #49
    “I had discerned the ways in which we had been sculpted by a tradition given to us by others, a tradition of which we were either willfully or accidentally ignorant. I had begun to understand that we had lent our voices to a discourse whose sole purpose was to dehumanize and brutalize others—because nurturing that discourse was easier, because retaining power always feels like the way forward.”
  5. #50
    Ignorance is the parent of fear.
  6. #51
    Ignorance is the parent of fear.
  7. #52
    She was heartily ashamed of her ignorance - a misplaced shame. Where people wish to attach, they should always be ignorant. To come with a well−informed mind is to come with an inability of administering to the vanity of others, which a sensible person would always wish to avoid. A woman especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.
  8. #53
    “One can’t judge till one’s forty; before that we’re too eager, too hard, too cruel, and in addition much too ignorant.”
  9. #54
    “I have learned that with creatures one loves, suffering is not the only thing for which one may pity them. A rabbit who does not know when a gift has made him safe is poorer than a slug, even though he may think otherwise himself.”
  1. #55
    ″“Do you like it?” asked Strawberry.
    Hazel puzzled over the stones. They were all the same size, and pushed at regular intervals into the soil. He could make nothing of them.
    “What are they for?” he asked again.”
  2. #56
    ″“Hazel,” he said quickly, “that’s a piece of flat wood—like that piece that closed the gap by the Green Loose above the warren—you remember? It must have drifted down the river. So it floats. We could put Fiver and Pipkin on it and make it float again. It might go across the river. Can you understand?”
    Hazel had no idea what he meant. Blackberry’s flood of apparent nonsense only seemed to draw tighter the mesh of danger and bewilderment.”
  3. #57
    “The thoughtless, the ignorant, and indolent, seeing only the apparent effects of things and not the things themselves, talk of law, of fortune, and chance. Seeing a man grow rich, they say, “How lucky he is!” Observing another become intellectual they exclaim, “How highly favored he is!” And noting the saintly character and wide influence of another, they remark, “How chance aids him at every turn!” They don’t see the trials and failures and the struggles which these men have voluntarily encountered in order to gain their experience; have no knowledge of the sacrifices they have made, of the undaunted efforts they have put forth, of the faith they have exercised, that they might overcome the apparently insurmountable, and realize the vision of their heart. They do not know the darkness and the heart aches; they only see the light and the Joy, and they call it “luck”; do not see the longing arduous journey, but only behold the pleasant goal, and call it “good fortune”; do not understand the process, but only perceive the result, and call it “chance”.”
  4. #58
    Always it was to be called a rod. If someone called it a pole, my father looked at him as a sergeant in the United States Marines would look at a recruit who had just called a rifle a gun.
  5. #59
    ″The most fundamental aggression to ourselves, the most fundamental harm we can do to ourselves, is to remain ignorant by not having the courage and the respect to look at ourselves honestly and gently.″
  6. #60
    “If you didn’t grow up like I did then you don’t know, and if you don’t know it’s probably better you don’t judge.”
  7. #61
    “For this is certain, no secure civilization can be built in the South with the Negro as an ignorant, turbulent proletariat.”
  8. #62
    “The significance of our lives and our fragile planet is then determined only by our own wisdom and courage. We are the custodians of life’s meaning. We long for a Parent to care for us, to forgive us our errors, to save us from our childish mistakes. But knowledge is preferable to ignorance. Better by far to embrace the hard truth than a reassuring fable.”
  9. #63
    “And a man who is puzzled and wonders thinks himself ignorant.”
  10. #64
    “Commentators who today talk of ‘The Dark Ages’ when faith instead of reason was said to ruthlessly rule, have for their animadversions only the excuse of perfect ignorance. Both Aquinas’ intellectual gifts and his religious nature were of a kind that is no longer commonly seen in the Western world.”
  11. #65
    “If you and I spend our seasons together we would find that our dreams and fantasies of happily-ever-after-love have holes in them through which the wind of karma blows: our yellow flag shakes. And I would like you to look ahead and see what I know: the wind will replace our pretty ideas with something brighter: life.”
  12. #66
    “But the man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be quite the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less cocksure, happier but less self-satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable Mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.”
  13. #67
    “It would be too easy to say that I feel invisible. Instead, I feel painfully visible, and entirely ignored.”
  14. #68
    “Whether in a suit or in a loincloth, people are ignorant, little thorns, cutting into one another.”
  15. #69
    “Whether in a suit or in a loincloth people are ignorant little thorns cutting into one another. They seem incapable of advancing beyond the violent tendencies which at one time were necessary for survival.”
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