concept

civilization Quotes

27 of the best book quotes about civilization
  1. #1
    “I had thought that I must mirror the outside world, create a carbon copy of white claims to civilization. It was beginning to occur to me to question the logic of the claim itself.”
  2. #2
    “America makes no claim to the banal. America believes itself exceptional, the greatest and noblest nation to ever exist, a lone champion standing between the white city of democracy and the terrorists, despots, barbarians, and other enemies of civilization.”
  3. #3
    “Mogadishu was like the postapocalyptic world of Mel Gibson’s Mad Max movies, a world ruled by roving gangs of armed thugs. They were here to rout the worst of the warlords and restore sanity and civilization.”
  4. #4
    “The shape of the world today does not permit us the luxury of soft-mindedness. A nation or a civilization that continues to produce soft-minded men purchases its own spiritual death on an installment plan.”
  5. #5
    “It has been said that civilization is twenty-four hours and two meals away from barbarism.”
  6. #6
    “I am not what you call a civilised man! I have done with society entirely, for reasons which I alone have the right of appreciating. I do not, therefore, obey its laws, and I desire you never to allude to them before me again!”
  7. #7
    “She had a naked child with her, a little naked girl, barely able to toddle, and after a while she set this child on the ground and give her a push and whispered something to her. This child come toward me, barely able t’walk, come toddling up to me and—Jesus, it makes you sick t’remember a thing like this! It stuck out its hand and tried to unbutton my trousers!”
  8. #8
    “George: “And the west, encumbered by crippling alliances, and hardened with a morality too rigid to accommodate itself to the swing of events, must…eventually…fall.”
  9. #9
    “Nick: UP YOURS! …
    George: You take the trouble to construct a civilization…to…to build a society, based on the principles of…of principle … then all at once … through all the sensible sounds of men building … comes the Dies Irae. And what is it? What does the trumpet sound? Up yours.”
  1. #10
    “Honey: (Hysterical) Leave me alone…I’m going…to…be…sick.
    George: The patterns of history.”
  2. #11
    “And now, tell me and tell me true. Where have you been wandering, and in what countries have you travelled? Tell us of the peoples themselves, and of their cities—who were hostile, savage and uncivilised, and who, on the other hand, hospitable and humane.”
  3. #12
    Roger gathered a handful of stones and began to throw them. Yet there was a space round Henry, perhaps six yards in diameter, into which he dare not throw. Here, invisible yet strong, was the taboo of the old life. Round the squatting child was the protection of parents and school and policemen and the law.
  4. #13
    “I realised, of course, that other people used these roads; but that night, it seemed to me these dark byways of the country existed just for the likes of us, while the big glittering motorways with their huge signs and super cafés were for everyone else.”
  5. #14
    “Buck’s first day . . . was like a nightmare. Every hour was filled with shock and suprirse. He had been suddenly jerked from the heart of civilization and flung into the heart of things primordial.”
  6. #15
    In a word, they wanted Progress, that hallowed, good, and gentle thing, and they demanded it in a terrible fashion, with oaths on their lips and weapons in their hands. They were barbarous, yes; but barbarians in the cause of civilization. [...] For our part, if we had to choose between the barbarians of civilization and those civilized upholders of barbarism, we would choose the former.
  7. #16
    “What are we? Humans? Or animals? Or savages? What’s grownups going to think?”
  8. #17
    “The world, that understandable and lawful world, was slipping away.”
  9. #18
    “Piggy and Ralph, under the threat of the sky found themselves eager to take a place in this demented but partly secure society. They were glad to touch the brown backs of the fence that hemmed in the terror and made it governable”

Books about history

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Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls book
Chapter book
7.0
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Dr. Seuss's Horse Museum book
Picture book
7.0
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Ada Lovelace book
Board book
6.6
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Emmeline Pankhurst book
Board book
6.6
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She Persisted Around the World book
Picture book
6.5
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Diana’s White House Garden book
Picture book
6.5
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Elizabeth Leads the Way book
Picture book
6.5
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This Little Artist book
Board book
6.3
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  1. #19
    “What we don’t like, what *I* don’t like, is the hypocrisy of these people. I want to hear them confess. They they, or some of their countrymen and their country’s government, violated the precepts of Christian, civilized, lawful life was bad enough; they they won’t see it, or say it, is what really rowels.”
  2. #20
    “For this is certain, no secure civilization can be built in the South with the Negro as an ignorant, turbulent proletariat.”
  3. #21
    “Therefore we are going to pay reparations to the Haitian people.′ Then you will see the beginnings of civilization.”
  4. #22
    “But if that just assuages guilt, it’s just another crime. To become minimally civilized, we would have to say, ‘We carried out and benefited from vicious crimes. A large part of the wealth of France comes from the crimes we committed against Haiti, and the United States gained as well.”
  5. #23
    The History of every major Galactic Civilization tends to pass through three distinct and recognizable phases, those of Survival, Inquiry and Sophistication, otherwise known as the How, Why, and Where phases. For instance, the first phase is characterized by the question ‘How can we eat?’ the second by the question ‘Why do we eat?’ and the third by the question ‘Where shall we have lunch?‘”
  6. #24
    “When the soldier of a civilized power is killed in action his limbs are composed and his body is borne by friendly arms reverently to the grave. The wail of the fifes, the roll of the drums, the triumphant words of the Funeral Service, all divest the act of its squalor, and the spectator sympathises with, perhaps almost envies, the comrade who has found this honourable exit. ”
  7. #25
    “Thus whole nations are roused to arms. Thus the Turks repel their enemies, the Arabs of the Soudan break the British squares, and the rising on the Indian frontier spreads far and wide. In each case civilization is confronted with militant Mahommedanism.”
  8. #26
    “When the soldier of a civilized power is killed in action his limbs are composed and his body is borne by friendly arms reverently to the grave. The wail of the fifes, the roll of the drums, the triumphant words of the Funeral Service, all divest the act of its squalor, and the spectator sympathises with, perhaps almost envies, the comrade who has found this honourable exit. ”
  9. #27
    “There’s nothing fundamentally wrong with people. Given a story to enact that puts them in accord with the world, they will live in accord with the world.”
Book Topics › soldiers
Children's Books About Soldiers