concept

morality Quotes

31 of the best book quotes about morality
  1. #1
    “Liberty cannot be established without morality, nor morality without faith; but they have seen religion in the ranks of their adversaries, and they inquire no further; some of them attack it openly, and the remainder are afraid to defend it.”
  2. #2
    “The safeguard of morality is religion, and morality is the best security of law and the surest pledge of freedom.”
  3. #3
    “We were too tired to help. Above 8,000 meters is not a place where people can afford morality.”
  4. #4
    “We know this to be a primary autonomic response, the so-called ‘shame’ or ‘blushing’ reaction to a morally shocking stimulus. It can’t be controlled voluntarily, as can skin conductivity, respiration, and cardiac rate.”
  5. #5
    “Vivian is spoiled, exacting, smart and quite ruthless. Carmen is a child who likes to pull wings off flies. Neither of them has anymore moral sense than a cat. Neither have I. No Sternwood ever had...”
  6. #6
    “Why can’t you harness Might so that it works for Right?… The Might is there, in the bad half of people, and you can’t neglect it.”
  7. #7
    “My daddy always told me to just do the best you knew how and tell the truth. He said there was nothin to set a man’s mind at ease like wakin up in the morning and not havin to decide who you were. And if you done somethin wrong just stand up and say you don’t it and say you’re sorry and get on with it. Dont haul stuff around with you.”
  1. #8
    “Quit being shocked when people don’t share your morality. Quit serving as judge and jury, in your own mind, of that person who just cut you off in traffic. Quit thinking you need to ‘discern’ what others’ motives are. And quit rehearsing in your mind what that other person did to you.”
  2. #9
    “Hunger makes thief of any man.”
  3. #10
    “I am very doubtful whether history shows us one example of a man who, having stepped outside traditional morality and attained power, has used that power benevolently.”
  4. #11
    “As to moral philosophy, they have the same disputes among them as we have here. They examine what are properly good, both for the body and the mind; and whether any outward thing can be called truly good, or if that term belong only to the endowments of the soul.”
  5. #12
    ″“What is middle class morality? Just an excuse for never giving me anything...” “I ain’t pretending to be deserving. I’m undeserving.”
  6. #13
    “Morality cannot be legislated, but behavior can be regulated. Judicial decrees may not change the heart, but they can restrain the heartless. The law cannot make an employer love an employee, but it can prevent him from refusing to hire me because of the color of my skin.”
  7. #14
    ″‘Just because I do not accept the teachings of the devotaries does not mean I’ve discarded a belief in right and wrong.
    ...
    Must someone, some unseen thing, declare what is right for it to be right? I believe that my own morality -- which answers only to my heart -- is more sure and true than the morality of those who do right only because they fear retribution.‘”

Books by Herman Melville

View All
  1. #15
    “Morality, as well as the sense of taste, is relative.”
  2. #16
    “The Chair she sat in, like a burnished throne.”
  3. #17
    “Mr. Eugenides, the Smyrna merchant
    Unshaven, with a pocket full of currants.”
  4. #18
    “Virtue and vice are concepts invented by human beings, words for a morality which human beings arbitrarily devised.”
  5. #19
    “And yet the fire through which Alexander Crummell went did not burn in vain. Slowly and more soberly he took up again his plan of life. More critically he studied the situation. Deep down below the slavery and servitude of the Negro people he saw their fatal weaknesses, which long years of mistreatment had emphasized. The dearth of strong moral character, of unbending righteousness, he felt, was their great shortcoming, and here he would begin.”
  6. #20
    “Never force the physical; instead infect your targets with heat, lure them into lust. Morality, judgment, and concern for the future will all melt away.”
  7. #21
    “Poor fellow! thought I, he means no mischief; it is plain he intends no insolence; his aspect sufficiently evinces that his eccentricities are involuntary… if I turn him away, the chances are he will fall in with some less indulgent employer, and then he will be rudely treated, and perhaps driven forth miserably to starve. Yes. Here I can cheaply purchase a delicious self-approval. To befriend Bartleby, to humor him in his strange willfulness, will cost me little or nothing, while I lay up in my soul what will eventually prove a sweet morsel for my conscience.”
  1. #22
    “Aside from higher considerations, charity often operates as a vastly wise and prudent principle – a great safeguard to its possessor.”
  2. #23
    “I am a man who, from his youth upwards, has been filled with a profound conviction that the easiest way of life is the best.”
  3. #24
    “Nippers…was a whiskered, sallow, and upon the whole rather piratical-looking young man of about five and twenty. I always deemed him the victim of two evil powers – ambition and indigestion.”
  4. #25
    “Up to a certain point the thought or sight of misery enlists our best affections; but, in certain special cases, beyond that point it does not. They err who would assert that invariably this is owing to the inherent selfishness of the human heart. It rather proceeds from a certain hopelessness of remedying excessive and organic ill. To a sensitive being, pity is not seldom pain. And when at last it is perceived that such pity cannot lead to effectual succor, common sense bids the soul be rid of it.”
  5. #26
    “It is not seldom the case that, when a man is browbeaten in some unprecedented and violently unreasonable way, he begins to stagger in his own plainest faith. He begins, as it were, vaguely to surmise that, wonderful as it may be, all the justice and all the reason is on the other side. Accordingly, if any disinterested persons are present, he turns to them for some reinforcement for his own faltering mind.”
  6. #27
    “Morality is: the mediocre are worth more than the exceptions... I abhore Christianity with a deadly hatred.”
  7. #28
    “Are physicists and biologists willing to believe in anything so long as it is not religious thought? Close enough. Has rationalism and moral thought provided us with an understanding of what is good, what is right, and what is moral? Not close enough. Has secularism in the terrible 20th century been a force for good? Not even close, to being close.”
  8. #29
    ″‘They do it all the time,’ says Hayden. ‘That’s what law is: educated guesses at right and wrong.‘”
  9. #30
    “Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens.”
  10. #31
    “Let the compromising expedient of the constitution be mutually adopted, which regards them as inhabitants, but as debased by servitude below the equal level of free inhabitants, which regards the slave as divested of two-fifths of the man.”

Books about slavery

View All
Picture book
7.0
Add to list
Picture book
6.0
Add to list
Picture book
5.5
Add to list
Picture book
5.5
Add to list
Picture book
5.4
Add to list
Picture book
5.3
Add to list
Picture book
5.1
Add to list
Book Topics › honesty
Children's Books About Honesty
Book Topics › ethics
Children's Books About Ethics
Join Our Kids Book Club
Learn More