concept

government Quotes

100+ of the best book quotes about government
  1. #1
    “How does it become a man to behave toward this American government to-day? I answer, that he cannot without disgrace be associated with it.”
  2. #2
    “I heartily accept the motto, — ‘That government is best which governs least’; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.”
  3. #3
    “The practical reason why, when the power is once in the hands of the people, a majority are permitted, and for a long period continue, to rule, is not because they are most likely to be in the right, nor because this seems fairest to the minority, but because they are physically the strongest. But a government in which the majority rule in all cases cannot be based on justice, even as far as men understand it.”
  4. #4
    “The character inherent in the American people has done all that has been accomplished; and it would have done somewhat more, if the government had not sometimes got in its way.”
  5. #5
    “Whatever the prerogatives of the executive power may be, the period which immediately precedes an election and the moment of its duration must always be considered as a national crisis, which is perilous in proportion to the internal embarrassments and the external dangers of the country.”
  6. #6
    “The American institutions are democratic, not only in their principle but in all their consequences; and the people elects its representatives directly, and for the most part annually, in order to ensure their dependence. The people is therefore the real directing power; and although the form of government is representative, it is evident that the opinions, the prejudices, the interests, and even the passions of the community are hindered by no durable obstacles from exercising a perpetual influence on society.”
  7. #7
    “The government itself, which is only the mode which the people have chosen to execute their will, is equally liable to be abused and perverted before the people can act through it.”
  8. #8
    “Government is at best but an expedient; but most governments are usually, and all governments are sometimes, inexpedient.”
  9. #9
    “Unlike those who call themselves no-government men, I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government.”
  10. #10
    “Let every man make known what kind of government would command his respect, and that will be one step toward obtaining it.”
  11. #11
    “We shall see hereafter that in America the real strength of the country is vested in the provincial far more than in the Federal Government.”
  12. #12
    “There is a cultural movement in the white working class to blame problems on society or the government, and that movement gains adherents by the day.”
  13. #13
    “The absence of a central government will not, then, as has often been asserted, prove the destruction of the republics of the New World; far from supposing that the American governments are not sufficiently centralized, I shall prove hereafter that they are too much so.”
  1. #14
    “The great end of justice is to substitute the notion of right for that of violence, and to place a legal barrier between the power of the government and the use of physical force.”
  2. #15
    “Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”
  3. #16
    “For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever”
  4. #17
    “He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures”
  5. #18
    “But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.”
  6. #19
    “Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government”
  7. #20
    “While all other Sciences have advanced, that of Government is at a stand; little better understood; little better practiced now than three or four thousand years ago.”
  8. #21
    “…whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.”
  9. #22
    He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us.
  10. #23
    “He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people”
  11. #24
    “Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes…”
  12. #25
    “A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral.”
  13. #26
    “Among the numerous advantages promised by a well constructed union, none deserves to be more accurately developed, than its tendency to break and control the violence of faction.”

Books about America

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Abe's Honest Words book
Picture book
7.0
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Elizabeth Leads the Way book
Picture book
6.5
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The Crayon Man book
Picture book
6.5
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Audrey Hepburn book
Board book
6.4
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Maya Angelou book
Board book
6.4
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National Parks of the USA book
Chapter book
6.3
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Old MacDonald Had a Truck book
Board book
6.3
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  1. #27
    “I am certain, O men of Athens, that if I had engaged in politics, I should have perished long ago, and done no good either to you or to myself.”
  2. #28
    “To rule a country of a thousand chariots, there must be reverent attention to business, and sincerity; economy in expenditure, and love for men; and the employment of the people at the proper seasons.”
  3. #29
    “Democracy is a poor system; the only thing that can be said for it is that it’s eight times as good as any other method. Its worst fault is that its leaders reflect their constituents— low level, but what can you expect?”
  4. #30
    “A prude thinks that his own rules of propriety are natural laws.”
  5. #31
    “He who exercises government by means of his virtue may be compared to the north polar star, which keeps its place and all the stars turn towards it.”
  6. #32
    “The name Manzanar meant nothing to us when we left Boyle Heights. We didn’t know where it was or what it was. We went because the government ordered us to.”
  7. #33
    “The multitude so united in one person is called a COMMONWEALTH; in Latin, CIVITAS. This is the generation of that great LEVIATHAN, or rather, to speak more reverently, of that mortal god to which we owe, under the immortal God, our peace and defence.”
  8. #34
    “LEVIATHAN called a COMMONWEALTH, or STATE (in Latin, CIVITAS), which is but an artificial man, though of greater stature and strength than the natural, for whose protection and defence it was intended; and in which the sovereignty is an artificial soul, as giving life and motion to the whole body.”
  9. #35
    “A commonwealth is said to be instituted when a multitude of men do agree, and covenant, every one with every one, that to whatsoever man, or assembly of men, shall be given by the major part the right to present the person of them all, that is to say, to be their representative; every one, as well he that voted for it as he that voted against it, shall authorize all the actions and judgements of that man, or assembly of men, in the same manner as if they were his own, to the end to live peaceably amongst themselves, and be protected against other men.”
  10. #36
    “Moving under what appeared to be government protection, to an area less directly threatened by the war seemed not such a bad idea at all. For some it actually sounded like a fine adventure.”
  11. #37
    ″‘Emigrate or degenerate! The choice is yours!‘”
  12. #38
    “As soon as the senate had been humbled and disarmed, such an assembly, consisting of five or six hundred persons, was found a much more tractable and useful instrument of dominion.”
  13. #39
    “The principles of a free constitution are irrecoverably lost, when the legislative power is nominated by the executive.”
  1. #40
    “Under a democratical government, the citizens exercise the powers of sovereignty; and those powers will be first abused, and afterwards lost, if they are committed to an unwieldy multitude.”
  2. #41
    “The character of the tribunes was, in every respect, different from that of the consuls. The appearance of the former was modest and humble; but their persons were sacred and inviolable. Their force was suited rather for opposition than for action. They were instituted to defend the oppressed, to pardon offences, to arraign the enemies of the people, and, when they judged it necessary, to stop, by a single word, the whole machine of government.”
  3. #42
    “This long peace, and the uniform government of the Romans, introduced a slow and secret poison into the vitals of the empire. The minds of men were gradually reduced to the same level, the fire of genius was extinguished, and even the military spirit evaporated.”
  4. #43
    “No State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage in the Senate.”
  5. #44
    “As a council of state, and as a court of justice, the senate possessed very considerable prerogatives; but in its legislative capacity, in which it was supposed virtually to represent the people, the rights of sovereignty were acknowledged to reside in that assembly. Every power was derived from their authority, every law was ratified by their sanction.”
  6. #45
    “Everywhere one may hear of ravenous dogs and wolves, and cruel men-eaters, but it is not so easy to find states that are well and wisely governed.”
  7. #46
    “A State for one man is no State at all.”
  8. #47
    “Is there anything surprising in one who passes from divine contemplations to the evil state of man, misbehaving himself in a ridiculous manner; if, while his eyes are blinking and before he has become accustomed to the surrounding darkness, he is compelled to fight in courts of law, or in other places, about the images or the shadows of images of justice, and is endeavouring to meet the conceptions of those who have never yet seen absolute justice?”
  9. #48
    “Whereas the truth is that the State in which the rulers are most reluctant to govern is always the best and most quietly governed, and the State in which they are most eager, the worst.”
  10. #49
    “I signed up to protect this country. I do not choose the wars. It happens that I love to fight. But I do not choose which battles I go to. Y’all send me to them. I had to wonder why these people weren’t protesting at their congressional offices or in Washington. Protesting the people who were ordered to protect them—let’s just say it put a bad taste in my mouth.”
  11. #50
    “How good it feels to walk without a veil on my head.”
  12. #51
    “What matters today, the issue which blocks the horizon, is the need for a redistribution of wealth. Humanity will have to address this question, no matter how devastating the consequences may be.”
  13. #52
    You have clearly proved that ignorance, idleness, and vice, are the proper ingredients for qualifying a legislator.

Books about democracy

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  1. #53
    “The regime got scared because if these opponents had reached Tehran, they would have freed those who represented a real threat to the government…”
  2. #54
    “Don’t worry. Everyone who left will come back. They’re just afraid of change.”
  3. #55
    Laws are best explained, interpreted, and applied by those whose interest and abilities lie in perverting, confounding, and eluding them.
  4. #56
    Regard to good morals than to great abilities; for, since government is necessary to mankind, they believe, that the common size of human understanding is fitted to some station or other; and that Providence never intended to make the management of public affairs a mystery to be comprehended only by a few persons of sublime.
  5. #57
    When a great office is vacant, either by death or disgrace (which often happens,) five or six of those candidates petition the emperor to entertain his majesty and the court with a dance on the rope; and whoever jumps the highest, without falling, succeeds in the office.
  6. #58
    “They realize at last that change does not mean reform, that change does not mean improvement.”
  7. #59
    “The only thing I’m afraid of about this country is that its government will someday become so monstrous that the smallest person in it will be trampled underfoot, and then it wouldn’t be worth living in.”
  8. #60
    “You are on an Indian reservation merely at the sufferance of the government. You are fed by the government, clothed by the government, your children are educated by the government, and all you have and are today is because of the government. If it were not for the government you would be freezing and starving today in the mountains. The government feeds and clothes and educates your children now, and desires to teach you to become farmers, and to civilize you, and make you as white men.
  9. #61
    “The purpose of war is to support your government’s decisions by force. The purpose is never to kill the enemy just to be killing him...but to make him do what you want him to do. Not killing...but controlled and purposeful violence. But it’s not your business or mine to decide the purpose of the control. It’s never a soldier’s business to decide when or where or how—or why—he fights; that belongs to the statesmen and the generals. The statesmen decide why and how much; the generals take it from there and tell us where and when and how. We supply the violence; other people—‘older and wiser heads,’ as they say—supply the control. Which is as it should be.”
  10. #62
    “But everywhere, sooner or later, he was stopped by men in white shirts with strict, smug expressions on their faces. And one couldn’t fight them. Not only did they have the state on their side, they were the state.”
  11. #63
    “Society in every state is a blessing, but government even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one…”
  12. #64
    People shouldn’t be afraid of their government. Governments should be afraid of their people.
    author
    Alan Moore
    book
    V for Vendetta
    character
    V
    concept
    government
  13. #65
    “And when a man seriously reflects on the idolatrous homage which is paid to the persons of kings, he need not wonder that the Almighty, ever jealous of his honor, should disapprove of a form of government which so impiously invades the prerogative of heaven.”
  1. #66
    “To this strange doctrine, viz. That in the state of nature every one has the executive power of the law of nature, I doubt not but it will be objected, that it is unreasonable for men to be judges in their own cases, that self-love will make men partial to themselves and their friends: and on the other side, that ill nature, passion and revenge will carry them too far in punishing others; and hence nothing but confusion and disorder will follow, and that therefore God hath certainly appointed government to restrain the partiality and violence of men.”
  2. #67
    “I easily grant, that civil government is the proper remedy for the inconveniencies of the state of nature, which must certainly be great, where men may be judges in their own case, since it is easy to be imagined, that he who was so unjust as to do his brother an injury, will scarce be so just as to condemn himself for it.”
  3. #68
    “Anti-government rhetoric appears to offer a vision of greater efficiency, self-reliance, and personal freedom. Unfortunately, this rhetoric ignores what has historically been most valuable about our skepticism toward government—the emphasis it places on personal responsibility from all citizens. Instead, it argues against the excesses of government but not against those of the marketplace, where there is great power to disrupt the lives of workers, families, and communities.”
  4. #69
    “In fact, its extreme case against government, often including intense personal attacks on government officials and political leaders, is designed not just to restrain government but to advance narrow religious, political, and economic agendas.”
  5. #70
    “Let us admit that some government programs and personnel are efficient and effective, and others are not. Let us acknowledge that when it comes to the treatment of children, some individuals are evil, neglectful, or incompetent, but others are trying to do the best they can against daunting odds and deserve not our contempt but the help only we—through our government—can provide.”
  6. #71
    Our masters have not heard the people’s voice for generations and it is much, much louder than they care to remember.
  7. #72
    “A rabbit has two ears; a rabbit has two eyes, two nostrils. Our two warrens ought to be like that. They ought to be together—not fighting. We ought to make other warrens between us—start one between here and Efrafa, with rabbits from both sides. You wouldn’t lose by that, you’d gain. We both would. A lot of your rabbits are unhappy now and it’s all you can do to control them, but with this plan you’d soon see a difference. Rabbits have enough enemies as it is. They ought not to make more among themselves. A mating between free, independent warrens—what do you say?”
  8. #73
    “National Socialism was a revulsion by my friends against parliamentary politics, parliamentary debate, parliamentary government—against all the higgling and the haggling of the parties and the splinter parties, their coalitions, their confusions, and their conniving. It was the final fruit of the common man’s repudiation of ‘the rascals’. Its motif was, ‘Throw them all out.‘”
  9. #74
    “What we don’t like, what *I* don’t like, is the hypocrisy of these people. I want to hear them confess. They they, or some of their countrymen and their country’s government, violated the precepts of Christian, civilized, lawful life was bad enough; they they won’t see it, or say it, is what really rowels.”
  10. #75
    “In any case, frequent punishments are a sign of weakness or slackness in the government. There is no man so bad that he cannot be made good for something. No man should be put to death, even as an example, if he can be left to live without danger to society.”
  11. #76
    “In the purely civil profession of faith...the Sovereign should fix the articles...as social sentiments.”
  12. #77
    “As soon as ay man says of the affairs of he State “What does it matter to me?” the State may be given up for lost.”
  13. #78
    “Recruiting brutal young roughs for the police. Proposing debilitating and will-sapping techniques of conditioning… Before we know where we are we shall have the full apparatus of totalitarianism.”
  1. #79
    “The moment the people is legitimately assembled as a sovereign body, the jurisdiction of the government wholly lapses.”
  2. #80
    ″... no country can be well governed unless its citizens as a body keep religiously before their minds that they are the guardians of the law and that the law officers are only the machinery for its execution, nothing more.”
  3. #81
    “Any government, whether it is a democracy, a dictatorship, a communistic or free enterprise bureaucracy, will fall when its hierarchy reaches an intolerable state of maturity.”
  4. #82
    “The skills required to run a great political campaign have little to do with the skills required to govern.”
  5. #83
    “The new constitution in its present form is calculated to produce despotism, thraldom and confusion, and if the United States do swallow it, they will find it a bolus, that will create convulsions to their utmost extremities. ”
  6. #84
    “Their ideas reached no farther than to give the general government the five per centum impost, and the regulation of trade. When it was agitated in Congress, in a committee of the whole, this was all that was asked, or was deemed necessary. Since that period, their views have extended much farther. Horrors have been greatly magnified since the rising of the Convention. ”
  7. #85
    ″ Were they mine enemies, the worst imprecation I could devise would be, may they adopt it. For tyranny, where it has been chained (as for a few years past) is always more cursed, and sticks its teeth in deeper than before.”
  8. #86
    ″‘Make no mistake about it: What we do here is highly illegal, but that does not mean we don’t follow the rule of law. My law.‘”
  9. #87
    “Liberty is to faction what air is to fire, an aliment without which it instantly expires. But it could not be less folly to abolish liberty, which is essential to political life, because it nourishes faction, than it would be to wish the annihilation of air, which is essential to animal life, because it imparts to fire its destructive agency.”
  10. #88
    “In a free government the security for civil rights must be the same as that for religious rights.”
  11. #89
    “I will only say that I have, with good intentions, contributed towards the organization and administration of the government the best exertions of which a very fallible judgment was capable.”
  12. #90
    “The unity of government which constitutes you one people is also now dear to you. It is justly so, for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence, the support of your tranquility at home, your peace abroad; of your safety; of your prosperity; of that very liberty which you so highly prize.”
  13. #91
    “If these states should either be wholly disunited, or only united in partial confederacies, a man must be far gone in Utopian speculations, who can seriously doubt that the subdivisions into which they might be thrown, would have frequent and violent contests with each other. To presume a want of motives for such contests, as an argument against their existence, would be to forget that men are ambitious, vindictive, and rapacious. To look for a continuation of harmony between a number of independent unconnected sovereignties, situated in the same neighborhood, would be to disregard the uniform course of human events, and to set at defiance the accumulated experience of ages.”
  1. #92
    “Complaints are everywhere heard […] that our governments are too unstable, that the public good is disregarded in the conflicts of rival parties, and that measures are too often decided, not according to the rules of justice and the rights of the minor party, but by the superior force of an interested and overbearing majority.”
  2. #93
    “A common passion or interest will, in almost every case, be felt by a majority of the whole; a communication and concert result from the form of government itself; and there is nothing to check the inducements to sacrifice the weaker party or an obnoxious individual.”
  3. #94
    “Hence it is that such democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths. ”
  4. #95
    “Ambition must be made to counteract ambition. The interest of the man must be connected with the constitutional rights of the place.”
  5. #96
    “I anticipate with pleasing expectation that retreat in which I promise myself to realize, without alloy, the sweet enjoyment of partaking, in the midst of my fellow-citizens, the benign influence of good laws under a free government, the ever-favorite object of my heart, and the happy reward, as I trust, of our mutual cares, labors, and danger.”
  6. #97
    “The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government.”
  7. #98
    “The idea of restraining the legislative authority, in the means for providing for the national defence, is one of those refinements, which owe their origin to a zeal for liberty more ardent than enlightened.”
  8. #99
    “…but cool and candid people will at once reflect, that the purest of human blessings must have a portion of alloy in them; that the choice must always be made, if not of the lesser evil, at least of the greater, not the perfect good; and that in every political institution, a power to advance the public happiness, involves a discretion which may be misapplied an abused.”
  9. #100
    “Unlimited power in the hands of limited people always leads to cruelty. ”
  10. #101
    “Political genius lies in extracting success even from the people’s ruin.”
  11. #102
    “We didn’t love freedom enough. And even more – we had no awareness of the real situation. ”
  12. #103
    “I pray that the leaders of this nation will submit their rule to the reign of Jesus Christ according to Daniel 7:14. I pray that the government and peace of Jesus Christ bring continual increase to our nation.”
  13. #104
    “I have inherited this burden of superstition and nonsense. I govern innumerable men but must acknowledge that I am governed by birds and thunderclaps”
Book Topics › freedom
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Children's Books About Protection
Book Topics › peace
Children's Books About Peace
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