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Australia Quotes

35 of the best book quotes about australia
01
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“I think I’ll move to Australia.”
Judith Viorst
author
Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
book
Alexander
character
bad days
to think
Australia
to move
concepts
02
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“It has been a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. My mom says some days are like that. Even in Australia. “
03
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“Together they have adventures when they skip school for the day, and experience the struggle of growing up in the racially mixed outback town.”
04
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“This is their country. An exciting, funny first novel from Australia about children moving between Aboriginal and white cultures.”
05
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“A truly enjoyable, and fun, Aussie tale! Detailed descriptions, whether it be of characters or bush scenes, made the book come to life. ”
06
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“That’s what it was, because after school my mom took us all to the dentist and Dr. Fields found a cavity just in me. Come back next week and I’ll fix it, said Dr. Fields. Next week, I said, I’m going to Australia.”
07
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“When we picked up my dad at his office he said that I couldn’t play with his copying machine, but I forgot. He also said to watch out for the books on his desk, and I was careful as could be except for my elbow. He also said don’t fool around with his phone, but I think I called Australia. My dad said please don’t pick him up anymore. ”
08
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“I hope you sit on a tack, I said to Paul. I hope the next time you get a double-decker strawberry ice-cream cone the ice cream part falls off the cone part and lands in Australia.”
09
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″ In a desperate chase through the mountains, it seems there is no longer anywhere for him to run to...”
10
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“‘Once there was a dark, stormy night in spring …’ On this night, Thowra, the silver brumby is born.”
11
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“But that is not the only danger. Thowra needs all his speed and cunning to save his herd from capture by man. ”
12
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“Never go near Man, nor his huts, nor his yards where he fences in cattle and his own tame horse.”
13
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″..as the landscape changes from a modern built-up townscape, through to farm land, and finally back to the wilderness of the aborigines. The one thing that stays constant is a much loved old fig tree.”
14
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“We go back to Barangaroo, in 1788, who is staying here with her Aborigine tribe. These brief synopses do nothing to impart the warmth, charm and humour of these write ups….”
15
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“Sam, in 1798, is an eleven year old convict, sent to Australia from England for stealing a jacket because he was cold. He works for Mr. Owen, who sometimes beats him.”
16
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“Starting in 1988 and going back 200 years, we are told the history of Australia by being told the history of one particular place, told by the generations of children who have lived in that one spot. ”
17
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“The book spans two centuries, from 1788 to 1988, and covers the same quarter acre of land – as we see how it has changed throughout this period. This is done via the voices of the children living there, and we visit them in 10-yearly intervals to learn about their lives and situations. The book travels backwards through time.”
18
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“Bertie, in 1918, has a brother who has lost a leg due to the War. Benjamin, in 1858 was actually born in San Francisco. His family came here because of the gold rush.”
19
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“Sofia in 1968 has photographs of Paul McCartney all over her bedroom wall, because he is her favorite Beatle.”
20
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“They ate Anzac biscuits in Adelaide, mornay and Minties in Melbourne, steak and salad in Sydney and pumpkin scones in Brisbane. Hush remained invisible.”
21
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After moving around to several towns in the UK, the family finally emigrates to Australia, but trouble still follows them there.
22
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“While Dad often made wisecracks about his origins, he always promised that one day the four of us would visit Australia, maybe even stay for a while.”
23
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Soon, it also becomes clear that they are up to no good. After much spying and some consulting of the library shelves, Henni and her friends prove that the Phonies, as they are now called, are money launderers.
24
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“But in Australia a model child is - I say it not without thankfulness- an unknown quantity. It may be that the miasmas of naughtiness develop best in the sunny brilliancy, of our atmosphere. It may be that the land and the people are young-hearted together, and the children’s spirits not crushed and saddened by the shadow of long years’ sorrowful history.”
25
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The boy living on the streets, seeking companionship and the need to protect (possibly the way he wasn’t), jealousy of a well looked after cat with a home, the use of crumbled up (thrown away) paper at the beginning and end of the book.
26
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“If Albert was right and they were only schoolgirls about the same age as his sisters in England, how was it they were allowed to set out alone, at the end of a summer afternoon? He reminded himself that he was in Australia now: Australia, where anything might happen. In England everything had been done before: quite often by one’s own ancestors, over and over again.”
27
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Two years after the Last Days, Australia has become a dangerous place, and a battle-ground for survival.
28
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Two years after the Last Days, Australia has become a dangerous place, and a battle-ground for survival.
29
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Then, at the heart of the city he comes upon Taronga Zoo, which has been strangely unaffected by the general chaos.
30
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Then, at the heart of the city he comes upon Taronga Zoo, which has been strangely unaffected by the general chaos.
31
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The goods train snaked across the vast southern desert of Australia. Sylvie stood waiting for it to bring the weekly provisions to the tiny settlement.
32
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“In China they killed all the sparrows. In Australia they killed all the rabbits. Everywhere man killed all wild life. Soon there was none, and all the birds were poisoned. Leader man said ‘At last! We are free of pests.‘”
33
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“Typical boys’ adventure story telling of a young Norwegian cabin boy, who decides to jump ship when his ship reaches Australia, and the adventures he has once there.”
34
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″ After a further brush with the mate who tries to recapture him, he finds a home and a new life. Written in 1973, this is a typical boys’ adventure yarn.”
35
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“Jarl is a young Norwegian cabin-boy, journeying to Australia, aboard the square-rigger Hootzen, at the turn of the 19/20th century. ”

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