concept

fantasy Quotes

66 of the best book quotes about fantasy
01
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“Commercials ... provide a slogan ... that creates for viewers a comprehensive and compelling image of themselves.”
Neil Postman
author
Amusing Ourselves to Death
book
television
manipulation
commerce
deceit
fantasy
media
concepts
02
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“But Fingolfin gleamed beneath it as a star; for his mail was overlaid with silver, and his blue shield was set with crystals; and he drew his sword Ringil, that glittered like ice.”
Fingolfin
character
03
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“and the song of Luthien released the bonds of winter, and the frozen waters spoke, and flowers sprang from the cold earth where he feet had passed. Then the spell of silence fell from Beren, and he called to her, crying Tinuviel; and the woods echoed the name.”
04
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“Now fair and marvellous was that vessel made, and it was filled with a wavering flame, pure and bright; and Earendil the Mariner sat at the helm, glistening with dust of elven-gems, and the Silmaril was bound upon his brow. ”
05
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“You know what killed off the dinosaurs, Whateley? We did. In one barbecue.”
06
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“My father and I were close once. In Jamaica, and even after we moved here, we were inseparable. Most times it felt like me and my dad—the Dreamers—against my mom and my brother—the Non-Dreamers...I listened to his stories about how our life would be after he became famous. I listened long after my mom and brother had stopped listening.”
07
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“What had only been imagination in life, now became tangible, each fantasy a full reality. I lived them all—while, at the same time, standing to the side, a witness to their, often, intimate squalor. A witness cursed with total objectivity.”
08
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“but none of these signs of malnourishment or illness or grief … detracted from Lux’s overwhelming impression of being a carnal angel.”
09
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“What we did see—for the mists were indeed all too malignly thinned—was something altogether different, and immeasurably more hideous and detestable. It was the utter, objective embodiment of the fantastic novelist’s “thing that should not be”;”
10
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“It was a terrible, indescribable thing vaster than any subway train—a shapeless congeries of protoplasmic bubbles, faintly self-luminous, and with myriads of temporary eyes forming and unforming as pustules of greenish light all over the tunnel.”
11
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“I will start out this evening with an assertion: fantasy is a place where it rains.”
12
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“You are this earth. You are not a fantasy: you are my love. And love is friendship lit by a wooden match with a white tip on its red tip. I am your match, and you are mine.”
13
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“Once upon a time there were four little Rabbits, and their names were Flopsy, Mopsy, Cotton-tail, and Peter.”
14
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In this story, the dish and the spoon run away to be performers, but end up having a hard life that involves 25 years in prison!
15
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“This is the dystopian story of Toby Lolness,where his life is turned upside down,with the whole tree against him and his family for crimes they did not commit and a secret that could change the very tree forever.”
16
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This book’s “net” to catch you in is that one meter in our world is about one millimeter in their world, and they live on a tree. This concept is just very original and is so intriguing.
17
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When J.J.’s mother reveals that she wants more time for her birthday, J.J. decides to go and find some. A task, at first, that seems like an impossible undertaking for a fifteen-year-old. That is until a neighbor shows J.J. an unlikely place to look for everyone’s lost time.
18
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A fascinating fantasy world about tree people with nice allegories to earth. When you first meet Toby, he is on the run--from his former friends, life, everything. He doesn’t even know where his parents are.
19
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When J.J.’s mother idly wishes for more time for her birthday, J.J. decides to find her some. But how can he find her time when he barely has enough time of his own to do the basics, like schoolwork—let alone to find out if the local rumors about his grandfather being a murderer are true?
20
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“The creatures didn’t move as she approached. They had never tried to hurt her, but she had a feeling that they were hiding their true nature.”
21
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A girl walks to school each day and sees a cat. The cat talks to her. The cat is quite the philosopher. She tells the girl what she knows about the world. The cat makes the girl late for school and that causes the girl problems.
22
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It’s an interesting narrative with a mystical, child-like wonder that reminds you of a fairy tale. Many plot points are understated, so this book needs a lot of reading between the lines. An enjoyable read, definitely.
23
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While waiting for help, Arthur notices two strange-looking men materializing out of thin air. They discuss a key and whether or not to give it to Arthur.
24
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“Oh, yes, willful was what I wanted to be. Utterly willful. A willful girl was like a hen that crowed: something special.”
25
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This is a great story about parents not listening to their daughter and said daughter saving their home. It also has wolves...in the walls! It is just the kind of story that should be read aloud, too, full of the rhythms and repeated refrains that fit with oral story telling.
26
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Honor Brown hates, absolutely hates school. It’s horrible--there are monsters and petrifying teachers. The students are crooks and pirates and everyone is so mean! They throw them out of windows and make them walk on glass. It’s so, so horrible, but what happens when it’s over?
27
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Arthur Penhaligon’s first days at his new school don’t go too well, particularly when a fiendish Mister Monday appears, gives Arthur a magical clock hand, and then orders his gang of dog-faced goons to chase Arthur around and get it back.
28
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On Earth, a boy named Arthur Penhaligon (the main character) is at a new school. He collapses during an outdoor cross country run during gym because of his severe asthma. Two of his schoolmates, Ed and Leaf, stop to help him use his inhaler before running to get help.
29
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Many universal themes are addressed in this little book. Willfulness is mentioned first because I think it ties with the ending theme of original sin (which is a story about willfulness.) The child attempts to determine if she is a willful child, the cat confirms that she is. The child then concludes “willful is what I want to be… something special.”
30
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It’s the art and the illustration that will actually creep you out. Like a damn nightmare you cannot come out of. They are gory. Not the black and white or blood red gory but gory.
31
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The story falls flat on the scare factor as the wolves are only perceived as the usual unwelcome guests in the family’s home and the story is slow-paced as it took time for the family to decide to rush back to their home.
32
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Where have they gone and will they be coming home again? When Griffin starts school and meets Princess Layla the answers to his questions gently start to unfold.
33
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Equating willfulness with being special, the child then confronts other themes of life such as eternity and loneliness. The cat declares that he is immortal. The girl concludes that they are both willful. As the girl identifies with the cat they discuss some of life’s themes. Loneliness is seen in the mailman and dog. The girl attempts to show empathy, but the cat will have none of that. He does not show compassion and is irritated that the girl will not follow his lead in being pitiless.
34
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Lucy knew that trouble was about to begin and tries to warn her family of the danger of staying in the house, even though her family do not believe her at first.
35
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It is interesting as it includes much exaggeration as to why the main character, Honor Brown, seems to hate school but then ends with her in an emotional state when she finally realises that she will really miss it once she has left.
36
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After meeting Suzy Blue and the first part of “the Will” (a frog-looking entity that knows everything about the House), Arthur learns that he’s been selected as Rightful Heir to the House and must get the other part of the clock hand in order to defeat Monday.
37
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This is a really fun, playful poetry book and I can see why children would like it. Honor Brown tells of school in a very imaginative, negative way which is actually really funny.
38
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Persuaded, Monday agrees to relinquish control of the key, which is shaped like the minute hand of an old clock, although he quickly becomes suspicious of Sneezer, who apparently never showed much intelligence before. Sneezer and Mister Monday then fight and disappear in a flash of light.
39
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A great example of an image where the wolves display both terror and humor is in the image of the wolves being shown in creepy shadows as they are watching television and are laughing their heads off.
40
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With a weapon-wielding hero and a villain who doesn’t make Mondays any nicer, Nix’s Keys to the Kingdom launch is imaginative and gripping. After an action-packed crescendo to the book’s middle -- when Arthur finally learns his destiny -- Nix keeps the drama going and doesn’t let it fall.
41
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I’ve learned that this tale is conceived with help from the kids of the Gaiman and McKean. Maddy Gaiman has a nightmare of wolves scratching the walls of their house. Gaiman helped Maddy cope with this fear by storytelling, making strategies to escape from the wolves or something like that—and these plotting became a part of the story.
42
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The book is so intuitive and allows so much expression and voice intonation. The characters are distinct individuals and I could instantly find their voice. The art is simply amazing
43
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Dave McKean’s illustrations are both haunting and hilarious at the same time. The wolves are portrayed as drawings made by a child, as it is implied on the front cover of the book. The wolves are also drawn in both a frightening and humorous way throughout the book.
44
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It’s just a run of the mill mid-grade fantasy quest Arthurian/Christian symbolism story. And to make matters worse, for me anyway, is that it is just so whimsical and overly descriptive.
45
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The entire book works. The color wash suits the drawing style which complements the story which is carried by mild misbehavior and mayhem.
46
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Ed travels to the addresses and helps out the tangled lives of their occupants. Further playing cards appear in his life, and Ed continues to unravel their mysteries.
47
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The narrative is just deadpan enough to highlight the moose shenanigans, and Bridget’s attempts to cope with these unruly guests actually hint in an exaggerated way at what real siblings might be like.
48
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Will her new partner ruin everything? Will Betty ever come back? And what on earth happened to the silver trophy everyone’s hoping to win? Lauren Child brings her trademark wacky wit and eccentric visual energy to a full-length, fast paced Clarice Bean episode that will charm even the most capricious reader.
49
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The characters are likable and there are a few minor twists and turns that keep things interesting. This isn’t a very long book so naturally it didn’t take too long to read, that being said however, I did find it difficult to put down. I think that kids of all ages would be able to follow the story and enjoy solving the mystery along with the children in the story.
50
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“Bridget’s room is too quiet, and she is tired of it. She wants a brother or a sister, a small, thin one that will fit in her doll’s bed. Or also a big brother who plays loud and noisy music. ”
51
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“But when I did get back, muddy from sliding down the hillside, bruised from fighting, once bleeding great spouts of blood from a stone wound to the head (I still have the scar, like a silver thumbnail), there would be the fire, and the smell of soup, and my mother’s arms not tearing me apart but trying to hold me, clean my face, or straighten my hair, while I twisted like a lizard to get away from her.”
52
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Just your typical ‘move into an old creepy house, weird stuff starts happening, one of the kids gets blamed, and then they find a book that explains the existence of fairies/faeries/fey which solves their problems... while at the same time causing many more problems’. Happens every day.
53
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The characters are likable and there are a few minor twists and turns that keep things interesting. This isn’t a very long book so naturally it didn’t take too long to read, that being said however, I did find it difficult to put down. I think that kids of all ages would be able to follow the story and enjoy solving the mystery along with the children in the story.
54
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The story centers on a mother and her three children, a set of twins and their older sister, who have just moved into the old dilapidated house that has been in the family for years. Very soon after moving in, strange occurrences begin to happen and the children dedicate themselves to solving the mystery.
55
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Simon, Jared and Mallory Grace move into a creepy Victorian house with their mother after their parents divorce and the three kids get themselves in trouble. After moving in, they discover that something isn’t quite right with the house. It’s haunted, but not by ghosts. It’s haunted by fairies and other classic fantasy creatures from another world.
56
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The characters are likable and there are a few minor twists and turns that keep things interesting. This isn’t a very long book so naturally it didn’t take too long to read, that being said however, I did find it difficult to put down. I think that kids of all ages would be able to follow the story and enjoy solving the mystery along with the children in the story.
57
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“I bet he’s in the pumpkin patch.” But the Duck was not in the pumpkin patch. They could not find him anywhere. So they waited...All that long afternoon... The Cat watched the door. The Squirrel paced the floor. “The Duck will be sorry when he comes home,” they muttered. But the Duck didn’t come home. Not even at soup time.
58
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“That’s mine!” squeaked the Squirrel. “Stirring is my job. Give that back!” “You’re much too small.” snapped the Cat. “We’ll cook the way we always have.” But the Duck held on tight... until the Squirrel tugged with all his might... and -WHOOPS!- the spoon spun through the air, and bopped the Cat on the head. Then there was trouble, a horrible squabble, a row, a racket, a rumpus in the old white cabin.
59
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Pumpkin soup. The best you ever tasted. Made by the Cat who slices up the pumpkin. Made by the Squirrel who stirs in the water. Made by the Duck who scoops up a pipkin of salt, and tips in just enough.
60
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“I’m not staying here,” wailed the Duck. ” You never let me help with anything.” And he packed up a wheelbarrow, put on his his hat, and waddled away. “You’ll be back,” stormed the Cat, “after we’ve cleaned up” And the Squirrel shook his spoon in the air. But the Duck didn’t come back. Not for breakfast. Not even for lunch. “I’ll find him”, scoffed the Cat. “He’ll be hiding outside.”
61
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Morpurgo here spins a yarn which gently captures the adventurous elements one would expect from a desert-island tale, but the real strength lies in the poignant and subtle observations of friendship, trust and, ultimately, humanity.
62
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Being a children’s book, I thought I would love it for the innocence in the writing and the illustrations. But heck, no (again!) I enjoyed it for what it is. Full of adventure, full of Robinson Crusoe vibes.
63
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However, he soon crosses paths with the island’s only other inhabitant: an irascible Japanese man named Kensuke. Despite the many differences between them, Michael and Kensuke soon become fast friends, but both of them will have to choose between their peaceful life on the island and the uncertainty of returning to civilisation…
64
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“But still there was nothing.”
65
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They’re sitting in Grandpa’s shed – a stray dog and the two children, Prince Neumann and Lotta. The dog is telling a story, because he knows he’ll be rewarded with crispy chicken skin and a warm corner of the shed to sleep. The dog is telling the story of G. Odd, the great inventor, in whose garden he used to live.
66
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“What are you doing over there?” asked the dog. “Collecting feathers,” said Lotta. She turned around. “And what are you doing?” The dog squinted in the sun. It was early in the morning. The sun’s rays were slanted and did not give off much warmth. The dog was small and black and thin and very dirty.

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