concept

family relationships Quotes

100+ of the best book quotes about family relationships
01
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“Mostly I thought of Mama. And when I first sat here, with my three-year-old boy beside me and the baby in my arms, it was Mama’s face I saw, Mama’s voice I heard, like it was yesterday.”
Ann Rinaldi
author
A Break with Charity
book
Susanna English
Mama English
characters
memories
family relationships
mothers and daughters
concepts
02
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“He and Sonny hadn’t ever got on too well. And this was partly because Sonny was the apple of his father’s eye. It was because he loved Sonny so much and was frightened for him, that he was always fighting for him.”
03
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“I stare at the floor and I wonder. How did they tolerate me.”
04
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“Some people build fences to keep people out and other people build fences to keep people in. Rose wants to hold on to you all. She loves you.”
05
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“He saw clearly too his own futile isolation. He had not gone one step nearer the lives he had sought to approach nor bridged the restless shame and rancour that had divided him from mother and brother and sister. He felt that he was hardly of the one blood with them but stood to them rather in the mystical kinship of fosterage, fosterchild and fosterbrother.”
06
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“She’s my daughter, Rose. My own flesh and blood. I can’t deny her no more than I can deny them boys. . . . You and them boys is my family. You and them and this child is all I got in the world. So I guess what I’m saying is . . . I’d appreciate it if you’d help me take care of her.”
07
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“I gave everything I had to try and erase the doubt that you wasn’t the finest man in the world. And wherever you was going . . . I wanted to be there with you. Because you was my husband. Cause that’s the only way I was gonna survive as your wife.”
08
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“I took onto Raynell like she was all them babies I had wanted and never had. . . . Like I’d been blessed to relive a part of my life. And if the lord see fit to keep up my strength . . . I’m gonna do her just like your daddy did you . . . I’m gonna give her the best of what’s in me.”
09
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“You can’t visit the sins of the father upon the child.”
10
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“Sometimes I wish I hadn’t known my daddy. . . . But I’ll say this for him . . . he felt a responsibility toward us. Maybe he ain’t treated us the way I felt he should have . . . but without that responsibility he could have walked off and left us.”
11
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“I married your daddy and settled down to cooking his supper and keeping clean sheets on the bed. When your daddy walked through the house he was so big he filled it up. That was my first mistake. Not to make him leave some room for me. . . . But at that time I wanted that.”
12
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“It’s my responsibility! You understand that? A man got to take care of his family. You live in my house . . . sleep you behind on my bedclothes . . . fill you belly up with my food . . . cause you my son. You my flesh and blood. Not cause I like you! Cause it’s my duty to take care of you!”
13
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“Whatever was between you and your daddy . . . the time has come to put it aside. Just take it and set it over there on the shelf and forget about it. Disrespecting your daddy ain’t going to make you a man, Cory. You got to find a way to come to that on your own.”
14
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“aOh, I see . . . I don’t count here no more. You ain’t got to say excuse me to your daddy. All of a sudden you done got so grown that your daddy don’t count around here no more. . . . You done got so grown to where you gonna take over. . . . You gonna wear my pants.”
15
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“Alright . . . Mr. Death. See now . . . I’m gonna tell you what I’m gonna do. I’m gonna take and build me a fence around this yard. See? I’m gonna build me a fence around what belongs to me. And then I want you to stay on the other side. See?”
16
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“I cannot blame them, Catelyn thought. They do not know. And if they did, why should they care? They never knew my sons. Never watched Bran climb with their hearts in their throats, pride and terror so mingled they seemed as one, never heard him laugh, never smiled to see Rickon trying so fiercely to be like his older brothers.”
17
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In a vague way he understood that his father was in trouble and that this was the reason why he himself had not been sent back to Clongowes. For some time he had felt the slight change in his house; and those changes in what he had deemed unchangeable were so many slight shocks to his boyish conception of the world.
18
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“He waited for some moments, listening, before he too took up the air with them. He was listening with pain of spirit to the overtone of weariness behind their frail fresh innocent voices. Even before they set out on life’s journey they seemed weary already of the way.”
19
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″ It was sobering to learn of a woman one generation removed who lived a life I can’t imagine or understand.”
20
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“– Ah, it’s a scandalous shame for you, Stephen, said his mother, and you’ll live to rue the day you set your foot in that place. I know how it has changed you.”
21
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“Blood does not define family. Love does.”
22
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“Only my grandmother knew about my book.”
23
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“It’s important that you know. Our family memory must not be lost.”
24
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“The basis of education comes from the family!”
25
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“Her mother had already abandoned her. Since that day, I’ve had doubts about the so-called ‘maternal instinct.‘”
26
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“When I lived with papa, he used to tell me what he thought about everything, so that I never had any opinions but his. And if I did have any of my own, I kept them quiet, because he wouldn’t have liked them. He called me his little doll, and he played with me just the way I played with my dolls.”
27
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″‘I told him you were ready to be part of this family.’ ‘I’m ‘already’ part of this family. I’m like a charter member.‘”
28
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“But when Eleanor walked in the house, it was like her siblings didn’t recognize her.”
29
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“When we talk ... nothing is said. ... Communication is awful hard between people. ”
30
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“In my culture, parents were sacred. We at least owed them an answer.”
31
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“But it’s like trying to hold on to a fistful of sand: all the little bits slip out of your hands, and then you’re just clutching air and grit.”
32
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“She didn’t like America, but she didn’t hate it, either. Two and a half years and eight gazillion books later, she had Bird. Then we moved to Brooklyn.”
33
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“Sister’s are supposed to fight and make up, because they are sisters and sisters always find their way back to each other.”
34
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“There is a specific kind of fight you can only have with your sister. It’s the kind where you say things you can’t take back. You say them because you can’t help but say them, because you’re so angry it’s coming up in your throat and out your eyes; you’re so angry you can’t see straight. All you see is blood.”
35
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“When his grandfather’s initial antagonism wore off, Benjamin and that gentleman took enormous pleasure in one another’s company. They would sit for hours, these two, so far apart in age and experience, and, like old cronies, discuss with tireless monotony the slow events of the day. Benjamin felt more at ease in his grandfather’s presence than in his parents’ – they seemed always somewhat in awe of him and, despite the dictatorial authority they exercised over him, frequently addressed him as ‘Mr.‘”
36
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“In 1920 Roscoe Button’s first child was born. During the attendant festivities, however, no one thought it “the thing” to mention, that the little grubby boy, apparently about ten years of age who played around the house with lead soldiers and a miniature circus, was the new baby’s own grandfather.”
37
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“I think that deep down Phoebe thought it was nice too, and she wished her own parents would act more like the Finneys. She couldn’t admit this, though, and in a way, I liked this about Phoebe – that she tried to defend her family.”
38
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“I thought she might change her mind, or at least tell me when she was leaving. But she did neither of those things. She left me a letter which explained that if she said good-bye, it would be too terribly painful and it would sound too permanent. She wanted me to know that she would think of me every minute and that she would be back before the tulips bloomed.”
39
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“See? I’m almost as good as your father!” She said it in a shy way, laughing a little. I felt betrayed, but I didn’t know why. ”
40
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“When my mother did not return, I imagined all sorts of things. Maybe she had cancer and didn’t want to tell us and was hiding in Idaho. Maybe she got knocked on the head and had amnesia and was wandering around Lewiston, not knowing who she really was, or thinking she was someone else.”
41
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“Sticking with your family is what makes it a family.”
42
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“And I realized when you look at your mother, you are looking at the purest love you will ever know.”
43
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“When a daughter loses a mother, she learns early that human relationships are temporary, that terminations are beyond her control, and her feelings of basic trust and security are shattered. ”
44
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“Such short little lives our pets have to spend with us, and they spend most of it waiting for us to come home each day. It is amazing how much love and laughter they bring into our lives and even how much closer we become with each other because of them.”
45
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“I didn’t mean anything by it, but that was one of the last memories she had of me, and I wished I could take it back.”
46
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“Gram and Gramps knew that I wanted to see Momma, but that I was afraid to.”
47
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“I know I’m just a trouble and a burden to you.”
48
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“Walter: (Violently) No! ‘Cause ain’t nobody with me! Not even my own mother!”
49
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“Oh, Dad, I don’t care how old you are, ever! I don’t care what, I don’t care anything! Oh, Dad . . . I love you!”
50
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“The only affection that prevailed against time and the war was that which he had felt for his brother José Arcadio when they both were children, and it was not based on love but on complicity.”
51
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“And now you must survive because we love you, and for the sake of your children and your children’s children.”
52
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“You don’t want that ... You think you do.”
53
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″ The confident young man in his imagination dwindled to a nervous little boy. ”
54
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“When Nath had been born, then Lydia, Marilyn had not informed her mother, had not even sent a photograph. What was there to say? She and James had never discussed what her mother had said about their marriage that last day: it’s not right. She had not ever wanted to think of it again. So when James came home that night, she said simply, “My mother died.” Then she turned back to the stove and added, “And the lawn needs mowing,” and he understood: they would not talk about it.”
55
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“In a family, is a secret a good thing? Theoretically, do you ever think, You know what would be great to keep from my family? A secret.”
56
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“She had a stare that stretched to infinity. She was, in that moment, not my mother but something separate from me.”
57
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“No one up in heaven could have made it up; the care a child took with an adult. ”
58
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“She had avoided burying her mother beneath a blanket of white flowers for, to her, white symbolized purity, and nothing - not even death - would lead her to link Emma Tilman with purity.”
59
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“I honor my father, Susanna. But I tremble to see him denouncing our friends and neighbors. We’ll not have a friend left when this business is done. I told him so, and we argued fiercely. I am afraid a rift is coming between us that will never heal.” “I can’t do anything about the rift between you and your father, Johnathan,” I said. “But you’ll have me for a friend. Always.”
60
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“Seeing my dad cry like that was just so terrible. What was going on between us, me being his son and him being my dad, is pushed down and something else is moving up in its place. It’s like a man looking down to see his son and seeing a monster instead.”
61
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“It all goes back and back. To our mothers and fathers and theirs before them. We are puppets dancing on the strings of those who came before us, and one day our own children will take up our strings and dance on in our steads.”
62
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“Do they miss their brothers and sisters, too? Bran wondered. Are they calling to Grey Wind and Ghost, to Nymeria and Lady’s Shade? Do they want them to come home and be a pack together?”
63
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“We used to go everywhere together, my mother and I—visiting ancient temples, exploring local museums, watching Hindu festivals, staying up late to see the streets bloom with candlelight Now, she barely takes me on social calls. It’s as if I’m a leper without a colony.”
64
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“Right now, with that lock of hair falling in his eyes, he’s the brother I’ve missed, the one who once brought me stones from the sea, told me they were Rajah’s jewels. I want to tell him that I’m afraid I’m going mad by degrees and that nothing seems entirely real to me anymore. I want to tell him about the vision […] I want to tell him everything and have him understand.”
65
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“I can’t stand the sight of them huddled together against the truth, deaf and dumb to anything remotely real.”
66
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“My family is vaguely Anglican, like everyone else, but the truth is that we rarely went to church in India. On Sundays, Mother took me for picnics under hot, cloudless skies. We’d sit on a blanket and listen to the wind whip across dry land, whistling to us. “This is our church,” she’d say combing fingers through my hair.”
67
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“Jasmín waves with both hands and calls out, “Adiós, mami. Adiós, mami. Adiós, mami.”
68
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“Is not the sky a father and the earth a mother, and are not all living things with feet or wings or roots their children?”
69
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“Let go of your daughter with grace and you’ll find her calling on you with joy.”
70
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“You’ve spent her whole life holding her. Whether cradled in your arms as a baby or wrapped in your embrace as a young woman, she’s been yours to have and to hold, Mother of the Bride—until now.”
71
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“Now the time has come to let her go, to let her begin her own family and pledge her allegiance to another.”
72
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“They were going on a family vacation over Thanksgiving. One problem, though: There were only three tickets.”
73
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“Researchers find that whatever a family does do to influence a child’s personality, it affects each child differently, as if each is growing up in a completely different family.”
74
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“As he handed it to me, I saw he’d gripped it so tightly his knuckles had turned white. We were not the kissing kind, me and Pa, but I wished that maybe he would at least hug me good-bye.”
75
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“Then, like a levee breaking, it all came out: “I took advantage of her. I manipulated her. I called her horrible things. I stole her car once, with a shoelace. I’d leave, for days at a time, without telling her where I’d gone or who I was out with. I must have given her ulcers. When I . . . when I left for college, we didn’t even say goodbye. I just got in my Honda and drove to Boulder. I stole a bottle of her gin from the cabinet on my way out.”
76
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“She was that kind of mother: who makes you doubt yourself, who would wipe you out if you let her. But I’m not going to pretend either. For a long time I let her say what she wanted about me, and what was worse, for a long time I believed her.
77
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“She was a beautiful woman dragging a crippled foot and I was that foot. I was bricks sewn into the hem of her clothes, I was a steel dress.”
78
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“I realized as I walked through the neighborhood how each house could contain a completely different reality. In a single block, there could be fifty separate worlds. Nobody ever really knew what was going on just next door.”
79
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“Bridget’s room is too quiet, and she is tired of it. She wants a brother or a sister, a small, thin one that will fit in her doll’s bed. Or also a big brother who plays loud and noisy music. ”
80
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I love the way she talks about her family, because it’s sorta different to how an adult would see it. I wasn’t super into the art style at first, but it definitely grew on me, so much so that I now think the art style really adds to the charm and value of this picture book. I’d love to read more about Clarice Bean!
81
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“She smiled, pleased that she had met her half sister at last, and wondering if they were going to be friends.”
82
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Johnny is relishing the annoyance he causes in his older sister and his younger brother. Roy is the young, stupid, naïve little kid. He always gave into his sister, loving her especially when she was like one of those “stern grocery store moms”. He gets frustrated when being left out because he seems like a young little pest. He is upset by the constant loss of the magic and happiness that was once in his life.
83
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“It’s beautiful, Mama” said Jamela, stroking the crisp new material. “Yes, it’s beautiful. It costs a lot of money -- but I need something special to wear for Thelma’s wedding”, said Mama.
84
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When your annoying little brother shares your room, your older brother is in the tunnel of adolescence, your dad hides in his office eating rocky road ice cream and swaying to Frank Sinatra, and your mother listen to foreign language tapes in a candlelit bathtub, what can you do to get away from it all?
85
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Retta, the responsible older sister trying to replace mom, frustrated by the lack of appreciation for her efforts and is hurt by the lack of loyalty from her brothers. Johnny, the pre-teen experiencing a need for rebellion and independence. He’s trying to make a splash because of the lack of attention he gets and how fed up he is with being told what to do.
86
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Meet the feisty Clarice Bean and sympathize with her search for just a little peace and quiet amidst a family many of us will recognize only too well. The witty text and jazzy illustrations capture the wonderful wacky chaos of a large extended family from the hilarious vantage point of one of its youngest members.
87
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Bright and brassy, this youngster will win over readers in a split second and will leave them hoping for more of her trials and tribulations.
88
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Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse is not a true story. While it is a novel, however, and while its plot and characters are fictional, its portrayal of life during the Great Depression and Dust Bowl of the 1930s is historically accurate
89
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The family drives for hours and moves into a small cottage by a river that starts up beyond them and eventually flows down into the ocean. Jess, an excellent swimmer who craves time in the water, loves the location and the river.
90
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“The Dursleys had everything they wanted but they also had a secret, and their greatest fear was that somebody would discover it. They didn’t think they could bear it if anyone found out about the Potters. Mrs. Potter was Mrs Dursley’s sister, but they hadn’t met for several years; in fact, Mrs Dursley pretended she didn’t have a sister, because her sister and her good-for-nothing husband were as unDursleysish as it was possible to be.”
91
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″‘It’s the only way to get rid of nits,’ said Dad. ‘But it never works!’ screamed Henry. And he ran for the door. Mum and Dad grabbed him. Then they dragged him kicking and screaming to the bathroom. ‘Nits are living creatures,’ howled Henry. ‘Why kill them.’ ‘Because...’ said Mum. ‘Because...because... they’re blood-sucking nits,’ said Dad. Blood-sucking. Henry had never thought of that. ”
92
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“My mother is pretty strict with me. My grandmother tries to put her two cents’ worth in as well, but Mama hates her butting in. The two of them are forever as loggerheads with each other. Like whenever school camp comes along, it’s fights galore. My grandmother thinks that if a member of our family isn’t looking after me I’ll get raped or murdered. She accuses my mother of being a bad mother for not caring enough and letting me go.”
93
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‘And on that island,’ said Sam, ‘my grandad Abdulla lives looking after his goats and tending his date trees.’ ‘That’s right,’ said Dad. ‘Perhaps,’ said Sam, ‘my balloon is going to visit Grandad Abdulla.’ ”
94
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“yes,′ said Dad. ‘Then it will fly high, high, high over the snow-decorated mountains where golden eagles nest; high, high over the sparkling blue-green sea where silver fish leap from the waves.”
95
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“I sat down at my place around the table y looked away from Mum. Dad wasn’t bothered about me -or anything else, for that matter. He was totally focused on his food. Jude, my seventeen-year-old brother, grinned knowingly at me. He’s a really irritating toad. I looked away from him as well. ‘He was with his dagger friend’ Jude smirked. ”
96
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“And Grandad Abdulla will say, ‘A balloon! A balloon for me! My grandson Sam must have sent it to show that, although he’s so far away, he’s thinking of me.’ ”
97
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“Mrs. Robinson has spared no effort to find Larry Ritchie, a stranger for more than eleven years to Lara. All the while during her mother’s illness there had been the spectre of the home for Lara if her father could not be traced. Mrs. Robinson had been as firm and as positive as Mum. ‘We are getting closer all the time to finding him. I’m sure of it. They’ll find the Man,’ her mother had told Lara over and over during those last weeks of her illness. ‘No child of mine will go to any home. I know Larry will come for you, Lara.’ ”
98
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“Lara feels completely alone after the death of her mother. She is an intruder in her father’s new family, living far away from all that has been familiar.”
99
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“Lara found it difficult to know just what to say. Here they were in the hot sun on the verandah of the school principal’s house - her long-lost father, this tall angular man with his piercing blue eyes, and her beloved teacher. Both of them standing and looking at her and expecting a reply of some kind. But she could only stare dumbly at this total stranger, who was nevertheless her only family now. Her father.”
100
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But two gerbils -like desert rats- come the Parkers’ way. The gerbils share a handy cage, and eat peanuts and other vegetarian food, and play hide-and-seek through the cardboard tubes of toilet rolls and kitchen paper. They have winning ways; but they don’t win over the children’s mother.
101
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A simple tale that will delight lovers of gerbils, which should not be confused with jerboas, which despite the similarity of their name belong to a totally different family, nor with golden hamsters.
102
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“Sid may not have loved his gerbils in the way that Peggy did, but he was conscientious about them. He changed their food and water daily, and cleaned out their cage every weekend. He exercised them often. What hey seemed to enjoy was the freedom of a limitless time -the living-room table would do- with a great many tunnels.”
103
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“As long as they were there, the gerbils belonged to Sid. But, from that very first afternoon, Peggy was the one who loved them. Sid would be doing his homework, or out playing football, or just watching television.”
104
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A boy gets two gerbils from a friend and so starts the battle between him and his sisters (with the silent support of his step-father) on one side and his mother on the other.
105
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“Wednesday, January 28th. Last Quarter. I woke up with a bit of a cold this morning. I asked my mother for a note to excuse me from games. She said she refused to namby-pamby me a day longer! How would she like to run about on a muddy field in the freezing drizzle, dressed only in PE shorts and a singlet?”
106
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“Erica stayed at the window and wondered about the surprise. It was only half a surprise now, because she knew it was coming, but she was glad in a way of the warning.”
107
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“She wanted to tell people about him. That he was a teacher, that he had lost his leg when his school was bombed. That he had loved her and told her stories, and now she was all alone in this big, sad land.”
108
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″ Charlie is the oldest; as the only adult she became the head of the family.”
109
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“Oldest daughter Charlie struggles to care for her sisters in the wake of the accident that took their parents, while each of the younger sisters narrates a volume of the series.”
110
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“These sisters are not perfect and they may not always get along, but in times of need, they can always count on one another.
111
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“All presente and correct,′ the driver added. Ahead of us, the other Granada was already parked near the front entrance - but there was no sign of Dad or Nicola. Our driver switched off the lights and the engine. ‘You folks go in, I ‘ll bring the bags,’ he said as he got out.”
112
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“While Dad often made wisecracks about his origins, he always promised that one day the four of us would visit Australia, maybe even stay for a while.”
113
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The mom is trying to be a stand up comedian which is different. Would have been nice to have Dad in the picture a little more. He mostly gets talked about, but then calls the household near the end of the book.
114
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This is a very moving account of a young girl’s life in a children’s home. The story is set in Germany, shortly after WW2....Halinka has one good person in her life, her mother’s sister, who loves her but can rarely see her.

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