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cancer Quotes

29 of the best book quotes about cancer
  1. #1
    “I’m dying, Landon.”
  2. #2
    “Mom sobbed something into Dad’s chest that I wish I hadn’t heard, and that I hope she never finds out that I did hear. She said, ‘I won’t be a mom anymore.‘”
  3. #3
    “That was the worst part about having cancer, sometimes: The physical evidence of disease separates you from other people.”
  4. #4
    “He went over and sat next to her on the side facing the window. She ran her hand through his hair, lifting it out of his eyes, and he could see how skinny her arm was, almost like it was just bone and skin.”
  5. #5
    ″ ‘What’s the use of you if you can’t heal her?’ Conor said, pounding away. ‘Just stupid stories and getting me into trouble and everyone looking at me like I’ve got a disease.’ ”
  6. #6
    ″ ‘You be as angry as you need to be,’ she said. ‘Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise. Not your grandma, not your dad, no one. And if you need to break things, then by God, you break them good and hard.’ ”
  7. #7
    ″ ‘You know that is not true,’ the monster said. ‘You know that your truth, the one that you hide, Conor O’Malley, is the thing you are most afraid of.’ ”
  1. #8
    “The world was then full of disease germs, as today it is full of carcinogens.”
  2. #9
    “You told me! I told you!”
  3. #10
    “I—want to—knowwwww! ... Somebody must be lyin’! I want to know!”
  4. #11
    “Born poor, raised poor, expect to die poor unless I manage to get us something out of what Big Daddy leaves when he dies of cancer!”
  5. #12
    “Aw, Brick, you—BREAK MY HEART! ”
  6. #13
    “Shouldn’t terminal illness, then, be the perfect gift to that young man who had wanted to understand death?”
  7. #14
    “I had a nagging sense that there was still far too much unresolved for me, that I wasn’t done studying.”

Books about cancer

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How Do You Care for a Very Sick Bear? book
Picture book
4.5
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Echo's Sister book
Chapter book
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When a Kid Like Me Fights Cancer book
Picture book
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Cancer Hates Kisses book
Picture book
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Halfway Normal book
Chapter book
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The Great Googlini book
Chapter book
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Wild Blues book
Chapter book
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  1. #15
    “My life had been building potential, potential that would now go unrealized. I had planned to do so much, and I had come so close. I’ve spent almost a third of my life preparing for it. I had mapped out this whole forty-year career for myself—the first twenty as a surgeon-scientist, the last twenty as a writer. But now that I am likely well into my last twenty years, I don’t know which career I should be pursuing. If I had some sense of how much time I have left, it’d be easier. If I had two years, I’d write. If I had ten, I’d get back to surgery and science. If only I knew how many months or years I had left. Tell me three months, I’d spend time with family. Tell me one year, I’d write a book. Give me ten years, I’d get back to treating diseases. The truth that you live one day at a time didn’t help: What was I supposed to do with that day?”
  2. #16
    “I sat, staring at a photo of Lucy and me from medical school, dancing and laughing; it was so sad, those two, planning a life together, unaware, never suspecting their own fragility.”
  3. #17
    “Whenever you read a cancer booklet or website or whatever, they always list depression among the side effects of cancer. But, in fact, depression is not a side effect of cancer. Depression is a side effect of dying. (Cancer is also a side effect of dying. Almost everything is, really.)”
  4. #18
    “People talk about the courage of cancer patients, and I do not deny that courage. I have been poked and stabbed and poisoned for years, and still I trod on.”
  5. #19
    “I hated hurting him. Most of the time, I could forget about it, but the inexorable truth is this: They might be glad to have me around, but I was the alpha and the omega of my parents’ suffering.”
  6. #20
    “Any part of me that identified with being handsome was slowly being erased—though, in fairness, I was happy to be uglier and alive.”
  7. #21
    “Medical training is relentlessly future-oriented, all about delayed gratification; you’re always thinking about what you’ll be doing five years down the line. But now I don’t know what I’ll be doing five years down the line. I may be dead. I may not be. I may be healthy. I may be writing. I don’t know. And so it’s not all that useful to spend time thinking about the future—that is, beyond lunch.”
  1. #22
    “Even if I’m dying, until I actually die, I am still living.”
  2. #23
    “The tricky part of illness is that, as you go through it, your values are constantly changing. You try to figure out what matters to you, and then you keep figuring it out. It felt like someone had taken away my credit card and I was having to learn how to budget. You may decide you want to spend your time working as a neurosurgeon, but two months later, you may feel differently. Two months after that, you may want to learn to play the saxophone or devote yourself to the church. Death may be a one-time event, but living with terminal illness is a process.”
  3. #24
    “I’m not really putting this very well. My point is this: This book contains precisely zero Important Life Lessons, or Little-Known Facts About Love, or sappy tear-jerking Moments When We Knew We Had Left Our Childhood Behind for Good, or whatever. And, unlike most books in which a girl gets cancer, there are definitely no sugary paradoxical single-sentence-paragraphs that you’re supposed to think are deep because they’re in italics. Do you know what I’m talking about? I’m talking about sentences like this:
    The cancer had taken her eyeballs, yet she saw the world with more clarity than ever before.
    Barf. Forget it. For me personally, things are in no way more meaningful because I got to know Rachel before she died. If anything, things are less meaningful. All right?”
  4. #25
    “She wanted so to be tranquil, to be someone who took walks in the late-afternoon sun, listening to the birds and crickets and feeling the whole world breathe. Instead, she lived in her head like a madwoman locked in a tower, hearing the wind howling through her hair and waiting for someone to come and rescue her from feeling things so deeply that her bones burned. She had plenty of evidence that she had a good life. She just couldn’t feel the life she had. It was as though she had cancer of the perspective.”
  5. #26
    “Romance has killed more people than cancer. Okay, maybe not killed, but dulled more lives. Removed more hope, sold more medication, caused more tears.”
  6. #27
    “Why don’t they tell the truth? Why don’t they tell how a pigpen looks after the sow’s eaten her children? Or how it is for a girl when her baby won’t come out? Or that cancer has a smell to it?”
  7. #28
    “I bet not one of them will tell you what cancer smells like. I can, though. It stinks. Like meat gone bad and dirty clothes and bog water all mixed together. Why doesn’t anyone tell you that?”
  8. #29
    “She remembered walking back from there last month, half-drunk with a gaggle of half-friends from her dorm, and when one of them asked her (only half-giving a shit) where she’d planned to go for Christmas break, Darby had answered bluntly: that it would require an act of God Himself to make her come back home to Utah. And apparently He’d been listening, because He’d blessed Darby’s mother with late-stage pancreatic cancer.”

Books about grief

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Grandpa's Top Threes book
Picture book
6.4
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Ida, Always book
Picture book
6.0
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A Stopwatch from Grampa book
Picture book
5.3
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Where Lily Isn't book
Picture book
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Something Very Sad Happened book
Picture book
5.0
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The Rough Patch book
Picture book
5.0
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Dance Like a Leaf book
Picture book
4.8
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The Goodbye Book book
Picture book
4.8
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Book Topics › illness
Children's Books About Illness
Book Topics › time
Children's Books About Time
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