concept

death Quotes

100+ of the best book quotes about death
  1. #1
    “The Bear lay on the ground, moving feebly. Then it mumbled in its throaty voice, bewildered to the last, ‘I--I don’t--understand,’ laid its big head down on the grass as quietly as a child going to sleep, and never moved again.”
  2. #2
    “She ruled in beauty o’er this heart of mine,
    A noble lady in a humble home,
    And now her time for heavenly bliss has come,
    ’Tis I am mortal proved, and she divine.
    The soul that all its blessings must resign,
    And love whose light no more on earth finds room
    Might rend the rocks with pity for their doom,
    Yet none their sorrows can in words enshrine;
    They weep within my heart; no ears they find
    Save mine alone, and I am crushed with care,
    And naught remains to me save mournful breath.
    Assuredly but dust and shade we are;
    Assuredly desire is mad and blind;
    Assuredly its hope but ends in death.”
  3. #3
    “Don’t wait until people are dead to give them flowers.”
  4. #4
    “Remember that all worlds draw to an end and that noble death is a treasure which no one is too poor to buy.”
  5. #5
    “While they continued to write and talk, we saw the wounded and dying. While they taught that duty to one’s country is the greatest thing, we already knew that death-throes are stronger.”
  6. #6
    “And if you’ve ever wondered what happens when a person close to you is taken too soon - and it’s always too soon - you may find other truths here, truths that may break the grip of sadness in your life, that may set you free from guilt, that may even bring you back to this world from wherever you are hiding. And then you will never feel alone.”
  7. #7
    “But finally it was time for me to return to my mortal world. It was reluctantly that the Lord said good-bye to me and added, “We will save a place at the banquet table for you. You will be eating with us soon, though, if you just remember to watch for the tests and hold to the dragon-ness within that softskin body. Now fare you well.”
  8. #8
    ″‘Yes,’ she said. ‘I’ll bring you home.‘”
  9. #9
    “I thought that if I did not eat and drink then death would simply follow, but in practice I found that thirst becomes such a frantic obsession that it takes a greater resolve than mine to resist it.”
  10. #10
    “No fear of that... Have you not guessed?... There was a real railway accident ... Your father and mother and all of you are--as you used to call it in the Shadow-Lands--dead. The term is over: the holidays have begun. The dream is ended: this is the morning.”
  11. #11
    “We often made fun of them and played jokes on them, but in our hearts we trusted them. The idea of authority, which they represented, was associated in our minds with a greater insight and a more humane wisdom. But the first death we saw shattered this belief. We had to recognize that our generation was more to be trusted than theirs. They surpassed us only in phrases and cleverness. The first bombardment showed us our mistake, and under it the world as they had taught it to us broke in pieces.”
  12. #12
    “Wilbur never forgot Charlotte. Although he loved her children and grandchildren dearly, none of the new spiders ever quite took her place in his heart.”
  13. #13
    “Nobody, of the hundreds of people that had visited the Fair, knew that a grey spider had played the most important part of all. No one was with her when she died.”
    author
    E.B. White
    book
    Charlotte's Web
    character
    Charlotte
    concept
    death
  14. #14
    “‘I read somewhere that 75 billion humans beings have lived and died since the beginning of history, and I believe their souls are out there somewhere.’ He looked straight up into the sky. ‘It makes me think of that John Lennon song. You know, ‘We all shine on in the moon and the stars and the sun.””
  15. #15
    “Our knowledge of life is limited to death.”
  16. #16
    “Too many, Thomas thought. Too many by far. His joy dribbled away, turned into a deep mourning for the twenty people who’d lost their lives. Despite the alternative, despite knowing that if they hadn’t tried to escape, all of them might’ve died, it still hurt, even though he hadn’t known them very well. Such a display of death—how could it be considered a victory?”
  17. #17
    “That is the inescapable math of tragedy and the multiplication of grief. Too many good people die a little when they lose someone they love. One death begets two or twenty or one hundred. It’s the same all over the world.”
  18. #18
    “You think the dead we loved truly ever leave us? You think that we don’t recall them more clearly in times of great trouble?”
  19. #19
    “We always see it too late. Why do they never tell us that you are poor devils like us, that your mothers are just as anxious as ours, and that we have the same fear of death.”
  20. #20
    “Do not pity the dead, Harry, pity the living, and above all those who live without love.”
  21. #21
    ″‘Precious, precious, precious!’ Gollum cried. ‘My Precious! O my Precious!’ And with that, even as his eyes were lifted up to gloat on his prize, he stepped too far, toppled, wavered for a moment on the brink, and then with a shriek he fell. Out of the depths came his last wail precious, and he was gone.”
  22. #22
    “It is the unknown we fear when we look upon death and darkness, nothing more.”
  23. #23
    “This book is to be neither an accusation nor a confession, and least of all an adventure, for death is not an adventure to those who stand face to face with it.”
  24. #24
    “As you see it it is, while the seeing lasts, dark nightmare-history, time-as-coffin; but where the water was rigid there will be fish, and men will survive on their flesh till spring. It’s coming, my brother. . . . Though you murder the world, transmogrify life into I and it, strong searching roots will crack your cave and rain will cleanse it: The world will burn green, sperm build again.”
  25. #25
    A couple of years after his wife died. It was too much to love in the apartment without her, everything reminded him, so when an apartment opened up in the floor above me he moved in.”
  26. #26
    “Finally there is nothing here for death to take away.”
  27. #27
    “So may you all.”
  28. #28
    “The Way of the samurai is found in death.”
  29. #29
    “Families can go years without hearing a thing, only to find their sons and daughters waiting on the front doorstep, home on leave or sometimes blissfully discharged. But usually you receive a letter made of heavy paper, stamped with the king’s crown seal below a short thank-you for your child’s life. Maybe you even get a few buttons from their torn, obliterated uniforms.”
  30. #30
    “It seemed to me that everyone knows they will die one day. My feeling was nobody can stop death; it doesn’t matter if it comes from a Talib or cancer. So I should do whatever I want to do.”
  31. #31
    “Children (the ignorant) pursue external pleasures; (thus) they fall into the wide-spread snare of death. But the wise, knowing the nature of immortality, do not seek the permanent among fleeting things.”
  32. #32
    “There is this doubt regarding what becomes of a man after death. Some say he exists, others that he does not exist. This knowledge I desire, being instructed by thee.”
  33. #33
    “So we drove on toward death through the cooling twilight.”
  34. #34
    “i am hopelessly
    a lover and
    a dreamer and
    that will be the
    death of me”
  35. #35
    “I just can’t make myself understand that God and the angels needed my father more than I did.”
  36. #36
    “I’m dying, Landon.”
  37. #37
    “It was, I remembered thinking, the most difficult walk anyone had to make.
    In every way, a walk to remember.”
  38. #38
    “Not the blood, sir. But all of a man’s water, ultimately, belongs to his people—to his tribe. It’s a necessity when you live near the Great Flat. All water’s precious there, and the human body is composed of some seventy percent water by weight. A dead man, surely, no longer requires that water”
  39. #39
    “She said, ‘If you go slowly, you risk getting sunstroke. But if you go too fast, you work up a sweat and then catch a chill inside the church.’ She was right. There was no way out.”
  40. #40
    “Maman died today. Or yesterday maybe, I don’t know. I got a telegram from the home: ‘Mother deceased. Funeral tomorrow. Faithfully yours.’ That doesn’t mean anything. Maybe it was yesterday.”
  41. #41
    “I was assailed by memories of a life that wasn’t mine anymore, but one in which I’d found the simplest and most lasting joys.”
  42. #42
    “Yet I fall fighting, fighting still!”
  43. #43
    “But a lot of times, people die how they live. And so last words tell me a lot about who people were, and why they became the sort of people biographies get written about. Does that make sense?”
  44. #44
    “She was alive, and they were dead. She had to try to make her life big.”
  45. #45
    “What is an “instant” death anyway? How long is an instant? Is it one second? Ten? The pain of those seconds must have been awful as her heart burst and her lungs collapsed and there was no air and no blood to her brain and only raw panic. What the hell is instant? Nothing is instant. Instant rice takes five minutes, instant pudding an hour. I doubt that an instant of blinding pain feels particularly instantaneous.”
  46. #46
    Gil-galad was an Elven-king.
    Of him the harpers sadly sing:
    The last whose realm was fair and free
    Between the Mountains and the Sea.
    His sword was long, his lance was keen,
    His shining helm afar was seen;
    The countless stars of heaven’s field
    Were mirrored in his silver shield.
    But long ago he rode away,
    And where he dwelleth none can say;
    For into darkness fell his star
    In Mordor where the shadows are.
  47. #47
    “I never wanted to go away, and the hard part now is leaving you all. I’m not afraid, but it seems as if I should be homesick for you even in heaven.”
  48. #48
    “‘I’m sorry,’ Laila says, marveling at how every Afghan story is marked by death and loss and unimaginable grief. And yet, she sees, people find a way to survive, to go on.”
  49. #49
    “But since Death comes,
    I meet him still afoot . . .
    And sword in hand!”
  50. #50
    “For with eyes made clear by many tears, and a heart softened by the tenderest sorrow, she recognized the beauty of her sister’s life--uneventful, unambitious, yet full of the genuine virtues which ‘smell sweet, and blossom in the dust’, the self-forgetfulness that makes the humblest on earth remembered soonest in heaven, the true success which is possible to all. ”
  51. #51
    “Living’s heavy work, but off to one side, the way we are, it’s useless, too. It don’t make sense. If I known how to climb back on the wheel, I’d do it in a minute. You can’t have living without dying. So you can’t call it living, what we got. We just are, we just be, like rocks beside the road.”
  52. #52
    “There are certain kinds of deaths that one should not be expected to relive, certain kinds of connections so deep that when they are broken you feel the snap of the link inside you.”
  53. #53
    “They hadn’t come here to fear. They hadn’t come to die. They had come to win.”
  54. #54
    “Then once, around midnight, I came to a hall in ruins. The cows in their pens lay burbling blood through their nostrils, with javelin holes in their necks. None had been eaten. The watchdogs lay like dark wet stones, with their heads cut off, teeth bared. The fallen hall was a square of flames and acrid smoke, and the people inside (none of them had been eaten either) were burned black, small, like dwarfs turned dark and crisp.”
  55. #55
    “And then there stole into my fancy, like a rich musical note, the thought of what sweet rest there must be in the grave.”
  56. #56
    ″... No war can be won without young men dying. Those things which are precious are saved only by sacrifice.”
  57. #57
    “I showed, not in word only but in deed, that, if I may be allowed to use such an expression, I cared not a straw for death, and that my great and only care was lest I should do an unrighteous or unholy thing.”
  58. #58
    “A certain fear of death, dull and oppressive, came to him. ”
  59. #59
    “The problem with happy endings, I said, is that they’re either not really happy, or not really endings, you know? In real life, some things get better and some things get worse. And then eventually you die.”
  60. #60
    “For the record, he who does fear death also dies only once, but whatever.”
  61. #61
    “It was as if I was bulletproof or something. How many times had I cheated death?”
  62. #62
    “When Bump died Memo went wild with grief...her womb stirring at the image of his restoration. Yet she saw down a dark corridor that he was laid out dead, gripping in his fingers the glowing ball he had caught.”
  63. #63
    “Later the dog whined loudly. And still later it crept close to the man and caught the scent of death. This made the animal bristle and back away. A little longer it delayed, howling under the stars that leaped and danced and shone brightly in the cold sky. Then it turned and trotted up the trail in the direction of the camp it knew, where were the other food providers and fire providers. ”
  64. #64
    “My fatal course is finish’d; and I go, A glorious name, among the ghosts below.”
    author
    Virgil
    book
    The Aenid
    character
    Dido
    concepts
    glorydeathfame
  65. #65
    “Though we tremble before uncertain futures may we meet illness, death and adversity with strength may we dance in the face of our fears.”
  66. #66
    “If certain, when this life was out,
    That yours and mine should be,
    I ’d toss it yonder like a rind,
    And taste eternity.”
  67. #67
    “The Carriage held but just Ourselves –
    And Immortality.”
  68. #68
    “We slowly drove – He knew no haste”
  69. #69
    “To die will be an awfully big adventure.”
  70. #70
    “Death ain’t nothing but a fastball on the outside corner.”
  71. #71
    “Because I could not stop for Death.”
  72. #72
    “‘Everybody wants to talk about how Khalil died,’ I say. ‘But this isn’t about how Khalil died. It’s about the fact that he lived. His life mattered. Khalil lived!’ I look at the cops again. ‘You hear me? Khalil lived!’”
  73. #73
    “Dewey Dell rises, heaving to her feet. She looks down at the face. It is like a casting of fading bronze upon the pillow, the hands alone still with any semblance of life: a curled, gnarled inertness; a spent yet alert quality from which weariness, exhaustion, travail had not yet departed, as though they doubted even yet the actuality of rest, guarding with horned and penurious alertness the cessation which they know cannot last.”
  74. #74
    Suppose you fell over with this fish. Is there anything you could do? Sure. Pray. It’d be like falling out of an airplane without a parachute and hoping you’ll land in a haystack. The only thing that’d save you would be God, and since He pushed you overboard in the first place, I wouldn’t give a nickel for your chances.
  75. #75
    “Death is like the insect
    Menacing the tree,
    Competent to kill it,
    But decoyed may be.”
  76. #76
    “‘When people don’t express themselves, they die one piece at a time. You’d be shocked at how many adults are really dead inside - walking through their days with no idea who they are, just waiting for a heart attack or cancer or a Mack truck to come along and finish the job. It’s the saddest thing I know.’”
  77. #77
    “Four of my teammates died not so much because Rob Hall’s systems were faulty […] but because on Everest it is the nature of systems to break down with a vengeance.”
  78. #78
    “The reason for living was to get ready to stay dead a long time.”
  1. #79
    “Dr. Y. Hiraiwa, professor of Hiroshima University of Literature and Science, and one of my church members, was buried by the bomb under the two storied house with his son, a student of Tokyo University. Both of them could not move an inch under tremendously heavy pressure. And the house already caught fire. His son said, ‘Father, we can do nothing except make our mind up to consecrate our lives for the country. Let us give Banzai to our Emperor.’ Then the father followed after his son, ‘Tenno-heika, Banzai, Banzai, Banzai!’ . . . In thinking of their experience of that time Dr. Hiraiwa repeated, ‘What a fortunate that we are Japanese! It was my first time I ever tasted such a beautiful spirit when I decided to die for our Emperor.”
  2. #80
    “It hurts to live after someone has died. It just does. It can hurt to walk down a hallway or open the fridge. It hurts to put on a pair of socks, to brush your teeth. Food tastes like nothing. Colors go flat. Music hurts, and so do memories. You look at something you’d otherwise find beautiful—a purple sky at sunset or a playground full of kids—and it only somehow deepens the loss. Grief is so lonely this way.”
  3. #81
    “Most of us were simply wrapped too tightly in the grip of summit fever to engage in thoughtful reflection about the death of someone in our midst.”
  4. #82
    “Would you like to hear my story, Bella? It doesn’t have a happy ending – but which of ours does? If we had happy endings, we’d all be under gravestones now.”
  5. #83
    “The dead air shapes the dead darkness, further away than seeing shapes the dead earth.”
  6. #84
    “Mortality had remained a conveniently hypothetical concept, an idea to ponder in the abstract. Sooner or later the divestiture of such a privileged innocence was inevitable, but when it finally happened the shock was magnified by the sheer superfluity of the carnage…”
  7. #85
    “No man that hath sovereign power can justly be put to death, or otherwise in any manner by his subjects punished. For seeing every subject is author of the actions of his sovereign, he punisheth another for the actions committed by himself.”
  8. #86
    “To be, or not to be: that is the question:
    Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
    Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
    And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
    No more; and by a sleep to say we end
    The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
    That flesh is heir to, ‘tis a consummation
    Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep;
    To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub;
    For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
    When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
    Must give us pause: there’s the respect
    That makes calamity of so long life;
    For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
    The oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
    The pangs of despised love, the law’s delay,
    The insolence of office and the spurns
    That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
    When he himself might his quietus make
    With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
    To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
    But that the dread of something after death,
    The undiscover’d country from whose bourn
    No traveller returns, puzzles the will
    And makes us rather bear those ills we have
    Than fly to others that we know not of?
    Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
    And thus the native hue of resolution
    Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought,
    And enterprises of great pith and moment
    With this regard their currents turn awry,
    And lose the name of action.--Soft you now!
    The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
    Be all my sins remember’d!”
    author
    Shakespeare
    book
    Hamlet
    concepts
    deathlife
  9. #87
    “He was the only person making his way into the city; he met hundreds and hundreds who were fleeing, and every one of them seemed to be hurt in some way. The eyebrows of some were burned off and skin hung from their faces and hands. Others, because of pain, held their arms up as if carrying something in both hands. Some were vomiting as they walked. Many were naked or in shreds of clothing. On some undressed bodies, the burns had made patterns—of undershirt straps and suspenders and, on the skin of some women (since white repelled the heat from the bomb and dark clothes absorbed it and conducted it to the skin), the shapes of flowers they had had on their kimonos. Many, although injured themselves, supported relatives who were worse off. Almost all had their heads bowed, looked straight ahead, were silent, and showed no expression whatsoever.”
  10. #88
    “They will want to know
    How was the audit done?
    And I shall say that it was done,
    For once,
    By those who knew the worth
    Of what was spent that day.”
  11. #89
    “Over everything—up through the wreckage of the city, in gutters, along the riverbanks, tangled among tiles and tin roofing, climbing on charred tree trunks—was a blanket of fresh, vivid, lush, optimistic green; the verdancy rose even from the foundations of ruined houses. Weeds already hid the ashes, and wild flowers were in bloom among the city’s bones. The bomb had not only left the underground organs of the plants intact; it had stimulated them.”
  12. #90
    “At first I would not go because there might be something I could do and I would not go because there might be something I could do and I would have to haul her back.”
  13. #91
    “Life... is a paradise to what we fear of death.”
  14. #92
    “This private estate was far enough away from the explosion so that its bamboos, pines, laurel, and maples were still alive, and the green place invited refugees—partly because they believed that if the Americans came back, they would bomb only buildings; partly because the foliage seemed a center of coolness and life, and the estate’s exquisitely precise rock gardens, with their quiet pools and arching bridges, were very Japanese, normal, secure; and also partly (according to some who were there) because of an irresistible, atavistic urge to hide under leaves.”
  15. #93
    “He kills her in her own humor.”
  16. #94
    ″‘Emigrate or degenerate! The choice is yours!‘”
  17. #95
    “Progress is difficult to define, your honor. As Quell would have it, they come to me with progress reports, but all I see is change, and bodies burnt.”
  18. #96
    ″‘There are evils beyond death,‘said his sister. ‘Fly you high, Henry. Fly you high.‘”
  19. #97
    “How shall I explain the dying that was done?
    Shall I say that each one did the math, and wrote
    The value of his days
    Against the bloody margin, in an understated hand?”
  20. #98
    “Poor Death, no match for the mighty altered carbon technologies of data storage and retrieval arrayed against him. Once we lived in terror of his arrival. Now we flirt outrageously with his sombre dignity, and beings like these won’t even let him in the tradesman’s entrance.”
  21. #99
    “After I finished. I couldn’t stop because there would be nothing left after I stopped.”
  22. #100
    “I think it’s something about the inevitability. How nothing can keep them apart-not her selfishness, or his evil, or even death, in the end...”
  23. #101
    “The legacy of World War Terminus had diminished in potency; those who could not survive the dust had passed into oblivion years ago, and the dust, weaker now and confronting the strong survivors, only deranged minds and genetic properties.”
  24. #102
    “Dead men are heavier than broken hearts.”
  25. #103
    “O, here
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!”
  26. #104
    “It is still a matter of wonder how the Martians are able to slay men so swiftly and so silently. Many think that in some way they are able to generate an intense heat in a chamber of practically absolute non-conductivity. This intense heat they project in a parallel beam against any object they choose, by means of a polished parabolic mirror of unknown composition, much as the parabolic mirror of a lighthouse projects a beam of light. But no one has absolutely proved these details”
  27. #105
    “Gerry was gone and he would never be back. That was the reality.”
  28. #106
    “They were best friends, lovers and soul mates destined to be together, everyone thought. But as it happened, one day destiny greedily changed its mind.”
  29. #107
    Death is easy when you’ve already tried to find it.
  30. #108
    “By the toll of a billion deaths man has bought his birthright of the earth, and it is his against all comers; it would still be his were the Martians ten times as mighty as they are. For neither do men live nor die in vain.”
  31. #109
    “She had felt relief, relief that his pain was gone, and relief that she had been there with him to witness the peace of his passing. She felt relieved to have known him, to love him and to be loved by him...”
  32. #110
    “Her best friend was gone and nobody understood that no amount of makeup, fresh air or shopping was going to fill the hole in her heart.”
  33. #111
    “Share everything.
    Play fair.
    Don’t hit people.
    Put things back where you found them.
    Clean up your own mess.
    Don’t take things that aren’t yours.
    Say you’re sorry when you hurt somebody.
    Wash your hands before you eat.
    Flush.
    Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.
    Live a balanced life-learn some and think some and draw and paint and sing and dance and play and work every day some.
    Take a nap every afternoon.
    When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together.
    Be aware of wonder. Remember the little seed in the Styrofoam cup: The roots go down and the plant goes up and nobody really knows how or why, but we are all like that.
    Goldfish and hamsters and white mice and even little seed in the Styrofoam up-they all die. So do we.
    And then remember the Dick-and-Jane books and the first word you learned-the biggest word of all-LOOK.”
  34. #112
    I am the Reaper and death is my shadow.
    author
    Pierce Brown
    person
    reaper
    book
    Red Rising
    character
    Darrow
    concept
    death
  35. #113
    ″‘DON’T THINK OF IT AS DYING,’ said Death, ‘JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH.‘”
  36. #114
    “Alright . . . Mr. Death. See now . . . I’m gonna tell you what I’m gonna do. I’m gonna take and build me a fence around this yard. See? I’m gonna build me a fence around what belongs to me. And then I want you to stay on the other side. See?”
  37. #115
    “Oh, the dead! she murmured, one pitied them, one brushed them aside, one had even a little contempt for them. They are at our mercy.”
  38. #116
    “Freedom or death lay at this table. Her past and future were seated on a glass throne.”
  39. #117
    “It is plain then that the good or ill fortunes of their friends do affect the dead somewhat.”
  40. #118
    “Dad paused, hesitating before speaking. ‘I just think that funerals are a lot like death itself. You can have your wishes, your plans, but at the end of the day, it’s out of your control.’”
  41. #119
    “I shouldn’t have to care. I shouldn’t have to work this hard. I realize now that dying is easy. Living is hard.”
  42. #120
    “What scared Stanley the most about dying wasn’t his actual death. He figured he could handle the pain. It wouldn’t be much worse than what he felt now. In fact, maybe at the moment of his death he would be too weak to feel pain. Death would be a relief. What worried him the most was the thought of his parents not knowing what happened to him, not knowing whether he was dead or alive. He hated to imagine what it would be like for his mother and father, day after day, month after month, not knowing, living on false hope. For him, at least, it would be over. For his parents, the pain would never end.”
  43. #121
    “I’d like to go by climbing a birch tree,
    And climb black branches up a snow-white trunk
    Toward heaven, till the tree could bear no more,
    But dipped its top and set me down again.
    That would be good both going and coming back.
    One could do worse than be a swinger of birches.”
  44. #122
    “As soon as his father walked in, that night, Nwoye knew that Ikemefuna had been killed, and something seemed to give way inside him, like the snapping of a tightened bow. He did not cry. He just hung limp.”
  45. #123
    “Is that what death would feel like? The nicest, warmest, heaviest never-ending nap? If that’s what it’s like, I wouldn’t mind. If that’s what dying is like, I wouldn’t mind that at all.”
  46. #124
    “As [Ekwefi] buried one child after another her sorrow gave way to the despair and then to grim resignation. The birth of her children, which should be a woman’s crowning glory, became for Ekwefi mere physical agony devoid of promise. The naming ceremony after seven market weeks became an empty ritual.”
  47. #125
    “I stand in front of the mirror and study my face.…It is the face of a sad, lonely girl something bad has happened to. I wonder if my face will ever look the same again, or if I’ll always see it in my reflection - Finch, Eleanor, loss, heartache, guilt, death.”
  48. #126
    “There’s something comforting in that. To go down as a family. No one left behind.”
  49. #127
    “When the Dementors approached him, he heard the last moments of his mother’s life, her attempts to protect him, Harry, from Lord Voldemort, and Voldemort’s laughter before he murdered her...”
  50. #128
    “But she’s wrong about hell. You don’t have to wait until you’re dead to get there.”
  51. #129
    “For my part, I should prefer death to hopeless bondage.”
  52. #130
    “I take it back, Woodrow,” Augustus said. “I have no doubt you’ll miss me. You’ll probably die of boredom this winter and I’ll never get to Clara’s orchard
  53. #131
    “I can well imagine an atheist’s last words: ‘White, white! L-L-Love! My God!‘—and the deathbed leap of faith. Whereas the agnostic, if he stays true to his reasonable self, if he stays beholden to dry, yeastless factuality, might try to explain the warm light bathing him by saying, ‘Possibly a f-f-failing oxygenation of the b-b-brain,’ and, to the very end, lack imagination and miss the better story.
  54. #132
    “We’re all going to want cookies if the world comes to an end,” Mrs. Nesbitt agreed. “And chips and pretzels. If the world is coming to an end, why should I care about my blood pressure?”
    “Okay, we’ll die fat,” Mom said.”
  55. #133
    You said you were death itself. Are you evil, then, or are you simply stronger and more awake than others?
  56. #134
    “You are not a grenade, not to us. Thinking about you dying makes us sad, Hazel, but you are not a grenade. You are amazing. You can’t know, sweetie, because you’ve never had a baby become a brilliant young reader with a side interest in horrible television shows.”
  57. #135
    It is nothing to die. It is frightful not to live.
  58. #136
    “Suddenly I’m having one of those moments that you have after losing someone - when you feel as if you’ve been kicked in the stomach and all your breath is gone, and you might never get it back. I want to sit down in the dirty, littered ground right now and cry until I can’t cry anymore.”
  59. #137
    “Death, taxes and childbirth! There’s never any convenient time for any of them.”
  60. #138
    “Are we then to call no man happy while he lives, and, as Solon would have us, look to the end? And again, if we are to maintain this position, is a man then happy when he is dead?”
  61. #139
    “I would say to you: Would you ever forgive me for that accident, for the death of your sister; would you ever forgive me, for I could never forgive myself!”
  62. #140
    ″‘How could any Lord have made this world?’ she asked. With her mind she had always seized the fact that there is no reason, order, justice: but suffering, death, the poor. There was no treachery too base for the world to commit; she knew that. No happiness lasted; she knew that.”
  63. #141
    “How aimless it was, how chaotic, how unreal it was, she thought, looking at her empty coffee cup. Mrs. Ramsay dead; Andrew killed; Prue dead too—repeat it as she might, it roused no feeling in her.”
  64. #142
    “Widows happen. Every day—don’t they, Your Highness?”
  65. #143
    “For men and women alike, this journey is a the trajectory between birth and death, a human life lived. No one escapes the adventure. We only work with it differently.”
  66. #144
    “Her tone was surprisingly tender, and probably she sensed how important he really was to her, because when he did die, two years further on, she went right after, and most of the people who knew her well agreed it was the sudden lack of opposition that undid her.”
  67. #145
    “Rue’s death has forced me to confront my own fury against the cruelty, the injustice they inflict upon us. But here, even more strongly than at home, I feel my impotence. There’s no way to take revenge on the Capitol. Is there?”
  68. #146
    “Life isn’t fair, it’s just fairer than death, that’s all.”
  69. #147
    “With my mother’s death all settled happiness, all that was tranquil and reliable, disappeared from my life. There was to be much fun, many pleasures, many stabs of Joy; but no more of the old security. It was sea and islands now; the great continent had sunk like Atlantis.”
  70. #148
    “True knowledge comes from the upward path which leads to the eternal fire; error, defeat and death result from following the lower path of worldly attachment.”
  71. #149
    “There was only this perfect sympathy of movement, of turning this earth of theirs over and over to the sun, this earth which formed their home and fed their bodies and made their gods . . . Some time, in some age, bodies of men and women had been buried there, houses had stood there, had fallen, and gone back into the earth. So would also their house, some time, return into the earth, their bodies also. Each had his turn at this earth. They worked on, moving together—together—producing the fruit of this earth.”
  72. #150
    “Methinks, by most, ‘twill be confess’d
    That Death is never quite a welcome guest.”
    author
    Goethe
    book
    Faust
    character
    Mephistopheles
    concept
    death
  73. #151
    “Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die!”
  74. #152
    “There is an unfair responsibility that comes with being an only child - you grow up knowing you aren’t allowed to disappoint, you’re not even allowed to die. There isn’t a replacement toddling around; you’re it. It makes you desperate to be flawless, and it also makes you drunk with the power. In such ways are despots made.”
  75. #153
    “Do I want to live? . . . [W]ould you like to live with your soul in the grave?”
  76. #154
    “Those who put themselves in His hands will become perfect, as He is perfect- perfect in love, wisdom, joy, beauty, health, and immortality. The change will not be completed in this life, for death is an important part of the treatment. How far the change will have gone before death in any particular Christian is uncertain.”
  77. #155
    “Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you!”
  78. #156
    “July 1, 1964, I lay in bed waiting for the bees to show up, thinking of what Rosaleen had said when I told her about their nightly visitations.
    ‘Bees swarm before death,’ she’d said.”

Books by William Shakespeare

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  1. #157
    “I’m tired of being enclosed here. I’m wearying to escape into that glorious world, and to be always there: not seeing it dimly through tears, and yearning for it through the walls of an aching heart: but really with it, and in it.”
  2. #158
    “I wanted him to know that I saw him, a guy who, even with a tear-streaked face, seemed to have two tiny smiles framing his eyes like parentheses . . . to remind the world he was alive.”
  3. #159
    “‘Are you possessed with a devil,’ he pursued, savagely, ‘to talk in that manner to me when you are dying? Do you reflect that all those words will be branded in my memory, and eating deeper eternally after you have left me?‘”
  4. #160
    “But I know what it’s like to want to die. How it hurts to smile. How you try to fit in but you can’t. You hurt yourself on the outside to try to kill the thing on the inside.”
  5. #161
    “Death alone from death can save. Love is death, and so is brave. Love can fill the deepest grave. Love loves on beneath the wave.”
  6. #162
    “He was living proof of one of my worst fears: Your parents really could die and leave you alone in the world.”
  7. #163
    “Death was a friend, and sleep was death’s brother.”
  8. #164
    “All in vain; because Death, in approaching him had stalked with his black shadow before him, and enveloped the victim.”
  9. #165
    “Death is at your side from the time you’re born, m’hija. You need to be friends with Death. That’s what makes you love Life. And when it’s your time to die, you won’t be scared. Because, m’hija, Death is your friend.”
  10. #166
    “Death is a debt to nature due,
    Which I have paid, and so must you.”
  11. #167
    “Every day in the United States, nearly 200,000 people are sickened by foodborne disease, 900 are hospitalized, and fourteen die. . . . Most of these cases are never reported to the authorities or properly diagnosed.”
  12. #168
    “All goes onward and outward, nothing collapses,
    And to die is different from what any one supposed, and luckier.”
  13. #169
    “Often, in the beginning, you will think that you are wasting time, but you must go on, be determined and persevere in it until death, despite all the difficulties.”
  14. #170
    Man cannot possess anything as long as he fears death. But to him who does not fear it, everything belongs. If there was no suffering, man would not know his limits, would not know himself.
  15. #171
    “Why am I not dead? I should be dead. It would best for everyone if I were dead.”
  16. #172
    “This day shall be thy birth-day, and thy grave.”
  17. #173
    “He who seeking his own happiness does not punish or kill beings who also long for happiness, will find happiness after death.”
  18. #174
    “Everyone dies alone, Eragon. Whether you are a king on a battlefield or a lowly peasant lying in bed among your family, no one can accompany you into the void.”
  19. #175
    ″‘How terrible,’ said Eragon, ‘to die alone, separate even from the one who is closest to you.‘”
  20. #176
    “It’s easy to talk to a horse if you understand his language. Horses stay the same from the day they are born until the day they die. They are only changed by the way people treat them.”
  21. #177
    “The death of something living is the price of our survival, and we pay it again and again. We have no choice. It is the one solemn promise every life on earth is born and bound to keep.”
  22. #178
    “The loss of a life: unwelcome. Immoral? I don’t know.”
  23. #179
    “When Alex left for Alaska,” Franz remembers, “I prayed. I asked God to keep his finger on the shoulder of that one; I told him that boy was special. But he let Alex die. So on December 26, when I learned what happened, I renounced the Lord. I withdrew my church membership and became an atheist. I decided I couldn’t believe in a God who would let something that terrible happen to a boy like Alex. After I dropped off the hitchhikers,” Franz continues,” I turned my van around, drove back to the store, and bought a bottle of whiskey. And then I went out into the desert and drank it. I wasn’t used to drinking, so it made me real sick. Hoped it’d kill me, but it didn’t. Just made me real, real sick.”
  24. #180
    “There is no more exciting sport than flying, for if you lose, you die.”
  25. #181
    “Who is it who decides that one man should live and another should die? My life wasn’t worth any more than his, but he’s the one who’s buried, while I get to enjoy at least a few more hours above the ground. Is it chance, random and cruel, or is there some purpose or pattern to all this, even if it lies beyond our ken?”
  26. #182
    “Being dead is not worse than being alive. It is different, though. You could say the view is larger.”
  27. #183
    “Anger has no old age but only death; The dead alone can feel no touch of spite.”
  28. #184
    “We rise again in the grass. In the flowers. In songs.”
  29. #185
    “For death is gain to him whose life, like mine, Is full of misery.”
  30. #186
    “We tell ourselves that pestilence is a mere bogy of the mind, a bad dream that will pass away. But it doesn’t always pass away and, from one bad dream to another, it is men who pass away.”
  31. #187
    “No youths have sung the marriage song for me, My bridal bed No maids have strewn with flowers from the lea, ‘Tis Death I wed.”
  32. #188
    “When I knew my mother would be dead in a few months, I had two choices . . .” She looked at him. “I could distance myself from the pain or get closer to it. Maybe because I’d lost my dad without getting a chance to tell him what he meant to me, I decided to get closer. I got so close, her pain and fear became my own. We shared everything and loved each other like we never had when death was some distant thing.”
  33. #189
    “The mass nature of wartime death is useful in many ways. It serves as spectacle, as diversion from the real movements of the War.”
  34. #190
    “There was the woman I was before my mom died and the one I was now, my old life sitting on the surface of me like a bruise.”
  35. #191
    “No man is mad enough to court his death.”
    author
    Sophocles
    book
    Antigone
    character
    The Chorus
    concepts
    madmendeath
  36. #192
    “The rosy gleam of his lip, the fevered gleam of his eyes. There was not a line anywhere on his face, nothing creased or graying; all crisp. He was spring, golden and bright. Envious death would drink his blood, and grow young again.”
  37. #193
    “It is curious how sometimes the memory of death lives on for so much longer than the memory of the life that it purloined. Over the years, as the memory of Sophie Mol [...] slowly faded, the Loss of Sophie Mol grew robust and alive.”
  38. #194
    “Die then, and love the dead if thou must; No woman shall be the master while I live.”
    author
    Sophocles
    book
    Antigone
    character
    Creon
    concepts
    deathwomancurse
  39. #195
    “Because I could not stop for Death
    He kindly stopped for me”
  40. #196
    Death may beget life, but oppression can beget nothing other than itself.
  41. #197
    “Thou must hasten therefore; not only because thou art every day nearer unto death than other, but also because that intellective faculty in thee, whereby thou art enabled to know the true nature of things, and to order all thy actions by that knowledge, doth daily waste and decay: or, may fail thee before thou die.”
  42. #198
    “Only Rahel noticed Sophie Mol’s secret cartwheel in her coffin.”
  43. #199
    “That death, so full of suffering for us both, suffering that still overwhelmed my life, was yet a severe mercy. A mercy as severe as death, a severity as merciful as love.”
  44. #200
    “Ah, if he could only die temporarily!”
  45. #201
    “The War was over, except for some one like Mrs Foxcroft at the Embassy last night eating her heart out because that nice boy was killed and now the old Manor House must go to a cousin; or Lady Bexborough who opened a bazaar, they said, with the telegram in her hand, John, her favourite, killed; but it was over; thank Heaven – over.”
  46. #202
    “The people out here were meant to go down first. We’re expendable.”
  47. #203
    “I looked at the stars, and considered how awful it would be for a man to turn his face up to them as he froze to death, and see no help or pity in all the glittering multitude.”
  48. #204
    “Their feelings about blackness were tied to feelings...about putrefaction and death.”
  49. #205
    “Really it was a miracle thinking of the war, and thousands of poor chaps, with all their lives before them, shovelled together, already half forgotten; it was a miracle.”
  50. #206
    “She felt somehow very like him—the young man who had killed himself. She felt glad that he had done it; thrown it away. The clock was striking. The leaden circles dissolved in the air. He made her feel the beauty; made her feel the fun. But she must go back. She must assemble.”
  51. #207
    “Marley was dead.”
  52. #208
    “Scrooge knew he was dead? Of course he did. How could it be otherwise? Scrooge and he were partners for I don’t know how many years. Scrooge was his sole executor, his sole administrator, his sole assign, his sole residuary legatee, his sole friend, and sole mourner. And even Scrooge was not so dreadfully cut up by the sad event, but that he was an excellent man of business on the very day of the funeral, and solemnised it with an undoubted bargain.”
  53. #209
    “I see a vacant seat,” replied the Ghost, “in the poor chimney-corner, and a crutch without an owner, carefully preserved. If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, the child will die.”
  54. #210
    “You may be an undigested bit of beef, a blot of mustard, a crumb of cheese, a fragment of an underdone potato. There’s more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are!”
  55. #211
    “Some day...after I am dead, you may perhaps come to learn the right and wrong of this. I cannot tell you.”
  56. #212
    “At the time of his death, my father remained a myth to me, both more and less than a man.”
  57. #213
    “He dreamed of never-ending life for those he deemed worthy, and death or forced sterilization for everyone else. He’d later praise Hitler for the “energetic measures” he took in that direction”
  58. #214
    ″...‘you heard the story of Hill House and decided not to stay. How would you leave, tonight?’ He looked around at them again, quickly. ‘The gates are locked. Hill House has a reputation for insistent hospitality; it seemingly dislikes letting its guests get away. The last person who tried to leave Hill House in darkness—it was eighteen years ago, I grant you—was killed at the turn in the driveway, where his horse bolted and crushed him against the big tree. Suppose I tell you about Hill House, and one of you wants to leave? Tomorrow, at least, we could see that you got safely to the village.‘”
  59. #215
    A father, sister, and mother, were gained, and lost, in that one moment.
  60. #216
    It is a common thing for the countenances of the dead, even in that fixed and rigid state, to subside into the long-forgotten expression of sleeping infancy, and settle into the very look of early life; so calm, so peaceful, do they grow again, that those who knew them in their happy childhood, kneel by the coffin’s side in awe, and see the Angel even upon earth.
  61. #217
    “From my vantage point, hidden behind the flowers, I’m level with the king’s box and slightly behind it. Mare Barrow, a few yards from the king. What would my family think, or Kilorn for that matter? This man sends us to die, and I’ve willingly become his servant. It makes me sick.”
  62. #218
    He looked like death; not death as it shows in shroud and coffin, but in the guise it wears when life has just departed; when a young and gentle spirit has, but an instant, fled to Heaven, and the gross air of the world has not had time to breathe upon the changing dust it hallowed.
    author
    Charles Dickens
    book
    Oliver Twist
    character
    Oliver
    concept
    death
  63. #219
    ″‘I’d bow, but I might fall over,’ I say to Queen Elara, and immediately I wish I could call back the words. She’s a Silver, I can’t talk to her that way. She could put me in the stocks, take away my rations, punish me, punish my family. No, I realize in my growing horror. She’s the queen. She could just kill me. She could kill us all.”
  64. #220
    “It is as if I had been going downhill while I imagined I was going up. And that is really what it was. I was going up in public opinion, but to the same extent life was ebbing away from me. And now it is all done and there is only death.”
  65. #221
    “She philosophically noted dates as they came past in the revolution of the year; the disastrous night of her life at Trantridge with its dark background of The Chase; also the dates of the baby’s birth and death; also her own birthday; and every other day individualized by incidents in which she had taken some share.”
  66. #222
    “It was an odd thing, but true, that the death of an enemy could affect you as much almost as much as the death of a friend.”
  67. #223
    “Suddenly some force struck him in the chest and side, making it still harder to breathe, and he fell through the hole and there at the bottom was a light.”
  68. #224
    “Just then his schoolboy son had crept softly in and gone up to the bedside. The dying man was still screaming desperately and waving his arms. His hand fell on the boy’s head, and the boy caught it, pressed it to his lips, and began to cry.”
  69. #225
    “Besides considerations as to the possible transfers and promotions likely to result from Ivan Ilych’s death, the mere fact of the death of a near acquaintance aroused, as usual, in all who heard of it the complacent feeling that, “it is he who is dead and not I.”
  70. #226
    We need be careful how we deal with those about us, when every death carries to some small circle of survivors, thoughts of so much omitted, and so little done.
    book
    Oliver Twist
    character
    Oliver
    concept
    death
  71. #227
    “He was much changed and grown even thinner since Pyotr Ivanovich had last seen him, but, as is always the case with the dead, his face was handsomer and above all more dignified than when he was alive.”
  72. #228
    “He sought his former accustomed fear of death and did not find it. ‘Where is it? What death?’ There was no fear because there was no death.
    In place of death there was light.”
  73. #229
    “He suffered ever the same unceasing agonies and in his loneliness pondered always on the same insoluble question: ‘What is this? Can it be that it is Death?’ And the inner voice answered: ‘Yes, it is Death.‘”
  74. #230
    “Death! Strange that there should be such a word, and such a thing, and we ever forget it; that one should be living, warm and beautiful, full of hopes, desires and wants, one day, and the next be gone, utterly gone, and forever!”
  75. #231
    “‘Ride with an outlaw, die with him,’ [Gus] added. ‘I admit it’s a harsh code. But you rode on the other side long enough to know how it works. I’m sorry you crossed the line, though.‘”
  76. #232
    ″‘So that’s what it is!’ he suddenly exclaimed aloud. ‘What joy!‘”