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racial injustice Quotes

34 of the best book quotes about racial injustice
  1. #1
    “I have been living in this country nine years longer than you have. Do you realize that? Yet I am prevented by law from becoming a citizen. I am prevented by law from owning land. I am now separated from my family without cause.”
  2. #2
    ″ ‘Being black doesn’t mean being stupid.’ Lord, how good it felt to speak her mind. She was through with ‘yessing’ people.”
  3. #3
    “I’m a Southerner, born and bred, but that doesn’t mean I approve of all that goes on here, and there are a lot of other white people who feel the same.”
  4. #4
    ″[Little Man] ran frantically along the road looking for a foothold and, finding one, hopped onto the bank, but not before the bus had sped past enveloping him in a scarlet haze while laughing white faces pressed against the bus windows.”
  5. #5
    “Maybe one day whites and blacks can be real friends, but right now the country ain’t built that way . . . The trouble is, down here in Mississippi, it costs too much to find out . . . So I think you’d better not try.”
  6. #6
    “They also said that slavery was good for us because it taught us to be good Christians—like the white people.” She sighed deeply, her voice fading into a distant whisper. “But they didn’t teach us Christianity to save our souls, but to teach us obedience. They were afraid of slave revolts and they wanted us to learn the Bible’s teachings about slaves being loyal to their masters.”
  7. #7
    “With the passage of time, I became increasingly aware of how all of the adults around me were living with constant fear and apprehension . . . I was feeling more and more vulnerable as I watched them continually struggle to solve the mystery of what white folks expected of them. They behaved as though it were an awful sin to overlook even one of those unspoken rules and step out of ‘their place,’ to cross some invisible line. And yet lots of discussions in my household were about how to cross that line, when to cross that line, and who could cross that line without getting hurt.”
  8. #8
    “Black folks aren’t born expecting segregation, prepared from day one to follow its confining rules. Nobody presents you with a handbook when you’re teething and says, ‘Here’s how you must behave as a second-class citizen.’ Instead, the humiliating expectations and traditions of segregation creep over you, slowly stealing a teaspoonful of your self-esteem each day.”
  9. #9
    “I ran to my room and fell onto the bed, burying my face in the pillow to hide the sobs that wrenched my insides. All my disappointment over not getting into Central High and the mob chase as well as the big sudden changes in my life over the past few weeks came crashing in on me.”
  10. #10
    “You’ll make this your last cry. You’re a warrior on the battlefield for your Lord. God’s warriors don’t cry, ‘cause they trust that he’s always by their side.”
  11. #11
    “It felt as though we always had a white foot pressed against the back of our necks.”
  1. #12
    “After three full days inside Central, I know that integration is a much bigger word than I thought.”
  2. #13
    “It felt as though we always had a white foot pressed against the back of our necks.”
  3. #14
    “You’ve gotta learn to defend yourself. You kids should have been given some training in self-defense . . . It’s never too late. It takes a warrior to fight a battle and survive. This here is a battle if I’ve ever seen one.”
  4. #15
    “It is a common custom, in the part of Maryland from which I ran away, to part children from their mothers at a very early age. Frequently, before the child has reached its twelfth month, its mother is taken from it, and hired out on some farm a considerable distance off, and the child is placed under the care of an old woman, too old for field labor. For what this separation is done, I do not know, unless it be to hinder the development of the child’s affection toward its mother, and to blunt and destroy the natural affection of the mother for the child. This is the inevitable result.”
  5. #16
    “In any society built on institutionalized racism, race-mixing doesn’t merely challenge the system as unjust, it reveals the system as unsustainable and incoherent. Race-mixing proves that races can mix—and in a lot of cases, want to mix. Because a mixed person embodies that rebuke to the logic of the system, race-mixing becomes a crime worse than treason.”
  6. #17
    “I speak advisedly when I say this,—that killing a slave, or any colored person, in Talbot county, Maryland, is not treated as a crime, either by the courts or the community.”
  7. #18
    “If the lineal descendants of Ham are alone to be scripturally enslaved, it is certain that slavery at the south must soon become unscriptural; for thousands are ushered into the world, annually, who, like myself, owe their existence to white fathers, and those fathers most frequently their own masters.”
  8. #19
    “We cannot be free until they are free.”
  9. #20
    “White people cannot, in the generality, be taken as models of how to live.”
  10. #21
    “Negroes do not, strictly or legally speaking, exist in any other [country]. ”
  11. #22
    “You can only be destroyed by believing that you really are what the white world calls a nigger.”

Books about slavery

View All
Abe's Honest Words book
Picture book
7.0
Before She Was Harriet book
Picture book
5.5
Words Set Me Free book
Picture book
5.3
Freedom Soup book
Picture book
5.1
So Tall Within book
Picture book
5.0
The Bell Rang book
Picture book
4.9
  1. #23
    “The really terrible thing, old buddy, is that you must accept them.”
  2. #24
    “Neither civilized reason nor Christian love would cause any of those people to treat you as they presumably wanted to be treated; only the fear of your power to retaliate would cause them to do that, or seem to do it, which was (and is) good enough.”
  3. #25
    “We black men have failed to protect our women since the time of slavery. We stay here in the South and are broken, or we run away and leave them alone to look after the children and themselves.”
  4. #26
    “Y’all asking a lot, Mr. Wiggins, from a poor old n***** who never had nothing.”
  5. #27
    “They sentence you to death because you were at the wrong place at the wrong time, with no proof that you had anything at all to do with the crime other than being there when it happened. Yet six months later they come and unlock your cage and tell you, We, us, white folks all, have decided it’s time for you to die, because this is a convenient date and time.”
  6. #28
    “I teach because it is the only thing that an educated black man can do in the South today. I don’t like it; I hate it.”
  7. #29
    “Me, Mr. Wiggins. Me. Me to take the cross. Your cross, nannan’s cross, my own cross. Me, Mr. Wiggins. This old stumbling n*****. Y’all axe a lot, Mr. Wiggins.”
  8. #30
    ″ Twelve white men say a black man must die, and another white man sets the date and time without consulting one black person. Justice? ”
  9. #31
    “So each time a male child is born, they hope he will be the one to change this vicious circle—which he never does. Because even though he wants to change it, and maybe even tries to change it, it is too heavy a burden because of all the others who have run away and left their burdens behind.”
  10. #32
    “And when I sat at Elijah’s table and watched the baby, the women, and the men, and we talked about God’s—or Allah’s—vengeance, I wondered, when that vengeance was achieved, What will happen to all that beauty then?”
  11. #34
    “Black has become a beautiful color—not because it is loved ... because it is feared.”
Book Topics › discrimination
Children's Books About Discrimination

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