concept

fathers Quotes

92 of the best book quotes about fathers
  1. #1
    ″[Father’s] letters were certainly warm enough, filled with his worries about us and his longing to be back home. But a man cannot be a father in a letter.”
  2. #2
    “Every morning, no matter how late he had been up, my father rose at 5:30, went to his study, wrote for a couple of hours, made us all breakfast, read the paper with my mother, and then went back to work for the rest of the morning. Many years passed before I realized that he did this by choice, for a living, and that he was not unemployed or mentally ill.”
  3. #3
    “No matter how bright your star became, I never cared about the music half as much as I cared about you as a daughter... I want you to know that.”
  4. #4
    “My dad told me that when I was born my cheeks were so fat the doctors didn’t know which end to spank.”
  5. #5
    “He was my father and yet he was a stranger to me. I had never seen him.
    I thought to myself, How can we ever speak to one another? He’s as strange to me as a demon.”
  6. #6
    “Writing taught my father to pay attention; my father in turn taught other people to pay attention and then to write down their thoughts and observations.”
  7. #7
    “I just can’t make myself understand that God and the angels needed my father more than I did.”
  8. #8
    “The kindest words my father said to me
    Women like you drown oceans.”
  9. #9
    ’Later that night, Dad stopped the car out in the middle of the desert, and we slept under the stars. We had no pillows, but Dad said that was part of his plan. He was teaching us to have good posture. The Indians didn’t use pillows, either, he explained, and look how straight they stood. We did have our scratchy army-surplus blankets, so we spread them out and lay there, looking up at the field of stars. I told Lori how lucky we were to be sleeping out under the sky like Indians.
    ‘We could live like this forever,’ I said.
    ‘I think we’re going to,’ she said.”
  10. #10
    “As a Scot and a Presbyterian, my father believed that man by nature was a mess and had fallen from an original state of grace. […] As for my father, I never knew whether he believed God was a mathematician but he certainly believed God could count and that only by picking up God’s rhythms were we able to regain power and beauty. Unlike many Presbyterians, he often used the word ‘beautiful.‘”
  11. #11
    “My father was very sure about certain matters pertaining to the universe. To him, all good things—trout as well as eternal salvation—come by grace and grace comes by art and art does not come easy.”
  1. #12
    “I thought that if he was my own father, he ought to love me. I was a little girl then, and didn’t know any better.”
  2. #13
    “About all he had left at this point was his tremendous dignity . . . Ten children and a lot of hard luck had worn him down, had worn away most of the arrogance he came to this country with. But he still had dignity, and he would not let those deputies push him out the door. He led them.”
  3. #14
    “While a man’s father is alive, look at the bent of his will; when his father is dead, look at his conduct. If for three years he does not alter from the way of his father, he may be called filial.”
  4. #15
    ″‘And it will soon grow again, Dad,’ said one of the Small Foxes. ‘It will never grow again,’ said Mr. Fox. ‘I shall be tail-less for the rest of my life.‘”
  5. #16
    “Mr. Fox looked at the four Small Foxes and he smiled. What fine children I have, he thought. They are starving to death and haven’t had a drink for three days, but they are still undefeated. I must not let them down.”
  6. #17
    “I took onto Raynell like she was all them babies I had wanted and never had. . . . Like I’d been blessed to relive a part of my life. And if the lord see fit to keep up my strength . . . I’m gonna do her just like your daddy did you . . . I’m gonna give her the best of what’s in me.”
  7. #18
    “You can’t visit the sins of the father upon the child.”
  8. #19
    “Sometimes I wish I hadn’t known my daddy. . . . But I’ll say this for him . . . he felt a responsibility toward us. Maybe he ain’t treated us the way I felt he should have . . . but without that responsibility he could have walked off and left us.”
  9. #20
    “Now I thought he was mad cause I ain’t done my work. But I see where he was chasing me off so he could have the gal for himself. When I see what the matter of it was, I lost all fear of my daddy. Right there is where I became a man . . . at fourteen years of age.”
  10. #21
    “It’s my responsibility! You understand that? A man got to take care of his family. You live in my house . . . sleep you behind on my bedclothes . . . fill you belly up with my food . . . cause you my son. You my flesh and blood. Not cause I like you! Cause it’s my duty to take care of you!”
  11. #22
    “He was so pleased that he was not going to let anybody share a grain of his pleasure. His father had praised him. They must think that he was perfectly indifferent.”

Books about love

View All
More Than Balloons book
Board book
6.2
Add to list
The Rag Coat book
Picture book
6.1
Add to list
Three Little Words book
Picture book
6.0
Add to list
All the Places to Love book
Picture book
6.0
Add to list
Penguin and Pinecone book
Board book
6.0
Add to list
Spot Loves His Daddy book
Board book
6.0
Add to list
The Trumpet of the Swan book
Chapter book
6.0
Add to list
Wherever You Are book
Picture book
5.9
Add to list
  1. #23
    “Then having lighted his pipe he took out his watch. He looked at it attentively; he made, perhaps, some mathematical calculation. At last he said, triumphantly:
    ‘Well done!’ James had steered them like a born sailor.”
  2. #24
    “He would like to show his drawings to his dad, but he didn’t dare. When he was in first grade, he had told his dad that he wanted to be an artist when he grew up. He’d thought his dad would be pleased. He wasn’t.”
  3. #25
    “He wasn’t strong because he wasn’t afraid. No, he was strong because he kept doing it even though he was afraid.”
  4. #26
    “Suddenly his mother let out a great shuddering sob. ‘O my God. O my God.’ She said it over and over, her head down on her arms. His father moved to put his arm around her awkwardly, but he didn’t take his eyes off Jess.”
  5. #27
    “She sat down, wary, tired, astonished at the wealth of her own feeling for. She was full of need. But, she reminded herself, you’re a grown woman.”
  6. #28
    “Someone once said that every man is trying to live up to his father’s expectations or make up for their father’s mistakes....”
  7. #29
    “My father was the model of discipline and courage. Sure, he was stern, and sometimes judgmental, but I always felt like he meant well.”
  8. #30
    “All I ask is my rights as a father; and you’re the last man alive to expect me to let her go for nothing; for I can see you’re one of the straight sort, Governor. Well, what’s a five pound note to you? And what’s Eliza to me?”
  9. #31
    “I became terrified of him when he was angry. His face . . . would grow red, and he would shout, shout so loudly and furiously that it would, literally, paralyze me. I would not be able to think.”
  10. #32
    “He talked about how happy he was to be a father, and how much he looked forward to ending his operator career and raising his newborn son, Kai.”
  11. #33
    “His father sat down on the dirt beside him...He was crying now, crying so hard he could barely breathe. His father pulled Jess over on his lap as if he were Joyce Ann. ‘There. There,” he said, patting his head. ‘Shhh. Shhh.‘”
  1. #34
    “A man must fill his life with meaning, meaning is not automatically given to life. It is hard work to fill one’s life with meaning...A life filled with meaning is worthy of rest. I want to be worthy of rest”
  2. #35
    “A span of life is nothing. But the man who lives that span, he is something. He can fill that tiny span with meaning, so its quality is immeasurable though its quantity may be insignificant.”
  3. #36
    “Reb Saunders sat back slowly in his chair. And from his lips came a soft, tremulous sigh. He was silent for a moment, his eyes wide, dark, brooding, gazing upon his son. He nodded his head once, as if in final acknowledgment of his tortured victory.”
  4. #37
    “Jekyll had more than a father’s interest; Hyde had more than a son’s indifference.”
  5. #38
    “At the time of his death, my father remained a myth to me, both more and less than a man.”
  6. #39
    “When he reenlisted anyway, I thought, Okay. Now I know. Being a SEAL is more important to him than being a father or a husband.”
  7. #40
    “[My father] taught me with silence. . .to look into myself, to find my own strength, to walk around inside myself in company with my soul. . . . One learns of the pain of others by suffering one’s own pain … by turning inside oneself. . . . It makes us aware of how frail and tiny we are and of how much we must depend upon the Master of the Universe.”
  8. #41
    “Then he spoke his son’s name.”
  9. #42
    “You have become a small giant since the day Danny’s ball struck your eye. You do not see it. But I see it. And it is a beautiful thing to see.”
  10. #43
    ″‘Pooh – I have as much of mother as father in me!’ she said. ‘All my prettiness comes from her, and she was only a dairymaid.‘”
  11. #44
    “Just then his schoolboy son had crept softly in and gone up to the bedside. The dying man was still screaming desperately and waving his arms. His hand fell on the boy’s head, and the boy caught it, pressed it to his lips, and began to cry.”

Books about death

View All
Where the Red Fern Grows book
Chapter book
6.5
Add to list
Grandpa's Top Threes book
Picture book
6.4
Add to list
The Rag Coat book
Picture book
6.1
Add to list
The Remember Balloons book
Picture book
6.0
Add to list
Ida, Always book
Picture book
6.0
Add to list
Wherever You Are book
Picture book
5.9
Add to list
Uncle Monarch and the Day of the Dead book
Picture book
5.8
Add to list
  1. #45
    “Boys look to their dad or key men in their lives to learn who they are as men.”
  2. #46
    “Why are they sad and glad and bad? I do not know. Go ask your dad.”
  3. #47
    “The father’s job is to teach his children how to be warriors, to give them the confidence to get on the horse to ride into battle when it’s necessary to do so. If you don’t get that from your father, you have to teach yourself.”
  4. #48
    “‘There’s nobody to guide them through the process of becoming a man... to explain to them the meaning of manhood. And that’s a recipe for disaster.’”
  5. #49
    ″‘Where are you planning to sleep, the Arctic Circle?’ she asked. I thought, There or maybe the Peruvian Andes, since that’s where Dad once camped. I started to keep a notebook called How to Survive in the Wild.”
  6. #50
    ″‘See,’ I said, ‘you don’t have any family and neither do I. I’ve got the preacher, of course. But I don’t have a mama. I mean I have one, but I don’t know where she is. She left when I was three years old. I can’t hardly remember her. And I bet you don’t remember your mama much either. So we’re almost like orphans.‘”
  7. #51
    “My son is my most precious possession. I have nothing in the world compared to my son. I must know what he is reading.”
  8. #52
    “Forgive me…for everything…I have done…A─ a wiser father…may have done differently. I am not…wise.”
  9. #53
    “I have no choice,” he said again. “It’s like a dynasty. If the son doesn’t take the father’s place, the dynasty falls apart. The people expect me to be their rabbi. My family has been their rabbi for six generations now.”
  10. #54
    “All of a sudden it was hard for me to talk. I loved the preacher so much. I loved him because he loved Winn-Dixie. I loved him because he was going to forgive Winn-Dixie for being afraid. But most of all, I loved him for putting his arms around Winn-Dixie like that, like he was already trying to keep him safe.”
  11. #55
    “There are better ways to teach a child compassion.”
  1. #56
    “I think the preacher thinks about my mama all the time, too. He’s still in love with her...But he doesn’t tell me that. He won’t talk to me about her at all.”
  2. #57
    “Balt Van Tassel was an easy indulgent soul; he loved his daughter better even than his pipe, and, like a reasonable man and an excellent father, let her have her way in everything.”
  3. #58
    ″ It was hard to turn my head, but I did it and looked away. ”
  4. #59
    ″‘She loved you very much.’
    ‘But she left me,’ I told him.
    ‘She left us,’ said the preacher softly...‘She packed her bags and left us, and she didn’t leave one thing behind.‘”
  5. #60
    “My daddy is a good preacher and a nice man, but sometimes it’s hard for me to think about him as my daddy, because he spends so much time preaching or thinking about preaching or getting ready to preach. And so, in my mind, I think of him as ‘the preacher.‘”
  6. #61
    “I could see that Winn-Dixie was having a good effect on the preacher. He was making him poke his head out of his shell.”
  7. #62
    ″‘When I told you your mama took everything with her, I forgot one thing, one very important thing she left behind.’
    ‘What?’ I asked.
    ‘You,’ he said. ‘Thank God your mama left me you.‘”
  8. #63
    Italians have a little joke, that the world is so hard a man must have two fathers to look after him, and that’s why they have godfathers.
  9. #64
    “It was too much to bear, to be loved that much. I’d be surrounded by scores of guards at the palace, but I couldn’t imagine a place safer than my father’s arms.”
  10. #65
    “But he’d been with me the whole time. He’d always been proud of me. Circumstance had pulled us apart, but he was never not my father.”
  11. #66
    “If the lineal descendants of Ham are alone to be scripturally enslaved, it is certain that slavery at the south must soon become unscriptural; for thousands are ushered into the world, annually, who, like myself, owe their existence to white fathers, and those fathers most frequently their own masters.”
  1. #67
    “Is it really such a big deal for a boy to look like his father? Which is typical butthead thinking, because of course it’s a big deal, if your father happens to be in prison.”
  2. #68
    “All you got from him is your looks and your size. You’ve got your mother’s heart, and that’s what counts.”
  3. #69
    “And then Mae found herself sobbing. Her father was a mess . . . And there was nothing she could do for him. No, there was too much to do for him. She could quit her job. She could quit and help make the phone calls, fight the many fights to keep him well. This is what a good daughter would do. What a good child, an only child, would do.”
  4. #70
    “A girl’s relationship with her father is the most important male relationship of her life.”
  5. #71
    “My daddy said, that the first time you fall in love, it changes you forever and no matter how hard you try, that feeling just never goes away.”
  6. #72
    “The father’s job is to teach his children how to be warriors, to give them the confidence to get on the horse to ride into battle when it’s necessary to do so. If you don’t get that from your father, you have to teach yourself.”
  7. #73
    “Seeing my dad cry like that was just so terrible. What was going on between us, me being his son and him being my dad, is pushed down and something else is moving up in its place. It’s like a man looking down to see his son and seeing a monster instead.”
  8. #74
    “I shed my guilt when I accepted my decision on its own terms, without endlessly prosecuting old grievances, without weighing his sins against mine. Without thinking of my father at all. I learned to accept my decision for my own sake, because of me, not because of him. Because I needed it, not because he deserved it.”
  9. #75
    “I am not the child my father raised, but he is the father who raised her.”
  10. #76
    “I believed then--and part of me will always believe--that my father’s words ought to be my own.”
  11. #77
    Never could I expect to be so truly beloved and important; so always first and always right in any man’s eyes as I am in my father’s.
    author
    Jane Austen
    book
    Emma
    character
    Emma Woodhouse
    concepts
    fatherslove
  1. #78
    “Scrooge was better than his word. He did it all, and infinitely more; and to Tiny Tim, who did not die, he was a second father. He became as good a friend, as good a master, and as good a man, as the good old city knew, or any other good old city, town, or borough, in the good old world.”
  2. #79
    “Few sons are the equals of their fathers; most fall short, all too few surpass them.”
    author
    Homer
    book
    Odyssey
    concepts
    fatherschildren
  3. #80
    “Papa, I got two wild yunguns locked in the kitchen.”
  4. #81
    “Papa, I got two wild yunguns locked in the kitchen.”
  5. #82
    “I knew medicine only by its absence—specifically, the absence of a father growing up, one who went to work before dawn and returned in the dark to a plate of reheated dinner.”
  6. #83
    “Father, I am what you made me. I’ve become your daughter after all.”
  7. #84
    “On this new level you live, you have been living more comfortably every day, with new morals, new principles. You have accepted things you would not have accepted five years ago, a year ago, things that your father, even in Germany, could not have imagined.”
  8. #85
    “Why does a man want his children to be better than himself?”
  9. #86
    “Don’t get upset? You’re telling me that my dad is a guy who’s basically an evil overlord, and you want me not to get upset?”
  10. #87
    “He can be the husband and father Hoyt’s dirty work has never permitted him to be. He can be a whole new man. He can be free.”
  11. #88
    “I wanted to tell you that the man who is your father, the man who gave you life, has found a woman who is in heaven when she’s in his arms.”
  12. #89
    “I wanted to tell you that the man who is your father, the man who gave you life, has found a woman who is in heaven when she’s in his arms.”
  13. #90
    “I realized that the childish impression I had always had of my father, as Just Lawgiver, was entirely wrong. We were utterly dependent on this man, who was not only deluded and ignorant, but incompetent in every way. What was more, I knew that my mother was incapable of standing up to him. It was like walking into the cockpit of an airplane and finding the pilot and co-pilot passed out drunk in their seats.”
  14. #91
    “Standing ten yards away is Connor’s father, still holding the cell phone he had just called from.”
  15. #92
    “The boys departed, and the wind was favorable. They came to their father’s harbor, and then Geirroth, who stood foremost in the boat, sprang up on land and shoved the boar back out to sea and said: “Go wherever the trolls take you!”
Book Topics › daughters
Children's Books About Daughters
Book Topics › family
Children's Books About Family
Join Our Kids Book Club
Learn More