concept

Freedom Quotes

58 of the best book quotes about freedom
  1. #1
    “Dobby is free.”
  2. #2
    “Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed.”
  3. #3
    It’s only after we’ve lost everything that we’re free to do anything.
  4. #4
    “I agree. Love shouldn’t be dictated.” “Nothing should be dictated!” An idiotic remark to a future king, but I was thinking of Lucinda.”
  5. #5
    “When you’ve understood this scripture, throw it away. If you can’t understand this scripture, throw it away. I insist on your freedom.”
  6. #6
    “Freely they stood who stood, and fell who fell.”
  7. #7
    “I formd them free, and free they must remain.”
  8. #8
    “Freedom now appeared, to disappear no more forever. It was heard in every sound and seen in every thing. It was very present to torment me with a sense of my wretched condition. I saw nothing without seeing it, I heard nothing without hearing it, and felt nothing without feeling it. It looked from every star, it smiled in every calm, breathed in every wind, and moved in every storm.”
  9. #9
    “It was a tiresome game, but I had to play it or feel a complete puppet.”
  10. #10
    “I prayed for freedom for twenty years, but received no answer until I prayed with my legs.”
  11. #11
    “War is peace.
    Freedom is slavery.
    Ignorance is strength.”
    author
    George Orwell
    book
    1984
    concepts
    FreedomWar
Books by Gail Carson LevineView All ››
Betsy Red Hoodie book
5.8
sheep · fractured fairy tales · Little Red Riding Hood stories
Betsy Red Hoodie
Ella Enchanted book
5.9
cinderella stories · magic · parties · perseverance · fairies · self-reliant princesses · princesses
Ella Enchanted
The Two Princesses of Bamarre book
5.5
bravery · self-reliant princesses · sisters · illness · adventure · princesses
The Two Princesses of Bamarre
  1. #12
    Where once you had the freedom to object, to think and speak as you saw fit, you now have censors and systems of surveillance coercing your conformity and soliciting your submission.
    author
    Alan Moore
    book
    V for Vendetta
    character
    V
    concept
    Freedom
  2. #13
    “Securing freedom and property to all men, and above all things, the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience.”
  3. #14
    “Be empty of worrying.
    Think of who created thought!
    Why do you stay in prison
    When the door is so wide open?”
  4. #15
    To me, freedom entitles you to do something, not to not do something.
  5. #16
    “To die hating them, that was freedom.”
    author
    George Orwell
    book
    1984
    concept
    Freedom
  6. #17
    “Just living is not enough,” said the butterfly, “one must have sunshine, freedom, and a little flower.”
  7. #18
    “Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four.”
    author
    George Orwell
    book
    1984
    concept
    Freedom
  8. #19
    But only in their dreams can men be truly free.
  9. #20
    “Oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever. The urge for freedom will eventually come. This is what has happened to the American Negro. Something within has reminded him of his birthright of freedom; something without has reminded him that he can gain it.”
  10. #21
    The caged bird sings with a fearful trill,
    of things unknown, but longed for still,
    and his tune is heard on the distant hill,
    for the caged bird sings of freedom.
  11. #22
    “I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in the stride toward freedom is not the White Citizens Councillor or the Ku Klux Klanner but the white moderate who is more devoted to order than to justice.”
  1. #23
    “The silver trump of freedom roused in my soul eternal wakefulness.”
  2. #24
    The country was in peril; he was jeopardizing his traditional rights of freedom and independence by daring to exercise them.
  3. #25
    “When you go free, nothing makes you happier, and when you hurt someone you care about, nothing can hurt more.”
  4. #26
    There is a huge amount of freedom that comes to you when you take nothing personally.
  5. #28
    “I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will.”
  6. #29
    I let go. Lost in oblivion. Dark and silent and complete. I found freedom. Losing all hope was freedom.
  7. #30
    “The war, however, and the rhetoric that accompanied it created an urgency in the black community to call in the long overdue debt their country owed them. “Men of every creed and every race, wherever they lived in the world” were entitled to “Four Freedoms”: freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear, Roosevelt said, addressing the American people in his 1941 State of the Union address.”
  8. #31
    “He who has conquered weakness, and has put away all selfish thoughts, belongs neither to oppressor nor oppressed. He is free.”
  9. #32
    “Did she die free?” asked Jem.
    “As the mountain air,” said Atticus.
  10. #33
    Human beings are free except when humanity needs them. Maybe humanity needs you. To do something. Maybe humanity needs me—to find out what you’re good for. We might both do despicable things, Ender, but if humankind survives, then we were good tools.
Books about religionView All ››
picture book
Santa's Prayer
When God Made Light book
5.0
picture book
When God Made Light
Hats of Faith book
4.9
board book
Hats of Faith
Ramadan book
4.8
board book
Ramadan
Diwali book
4.6
board book
Diwali
  1. #34
    “I have observed this in my experience of slavery, - that whenever my condition was improved, instead of its increasing my contentment, it only increased my desire to be free, and set me to thinking of plans to gain my freedom. I have found that, to make a contented slave, it is necessary to make a thoughtless one. It is necessary to darken his moral and mental vision, and, as far as possible, to annihilate the power of reason. He must be able to detect no inconsistencies in slavery; he must be made to feel that slavery is right; and he can be brought to that only when he ceased to be a man.”
  2. #35
    “The holes are all hidden and the Owsla have every rabbit in the place under orders. You can’t call your life your own: and in return you have safety—if it’s worth having at the price you pay.”
  3. #36
    “A city which belongs to just one man is no true city.”
    author
    Sophocles
    book
    Antigone
    character
    Haemon
    concept
    Freedom
  4. #37
    “She had not known the weight until she felt the freedom.”
  5. #38
    “It wasn’t northern agitators who pushed Negroes to question their country, as so many southern whites wanted to believe. It was their own pride, their patriotism, their deep and abiding belief in the possibility of democracy that inspired the Negro people. And why not? Who knew American democracy more intimately than the Negro people? They knew democracy’s every virtue, vice, and shortcoming, its voice and contour, by its profound and persistent absence in their lives. The failure to secure the blessings of democracy was the feature that most defined their existence in America. Every Sunday they made their way to their sanctuaries and fervently prayed to the Lord to send them a sign that democracy would come to them.”
  6. #39
    “All men are free and equal, in the grave.”
  7. #40
    “It has never occurred to you,” he said, “that you might have as much right to be here as anyone.”
  8. #41
    To be left alone on the tightrope of youthful unknowing is to experience the excruciating beauty of full freedom and the threat of eternal indecision
  9. #42
    “He said positive liberty is self-mastery—the rule of the self, by the self. To have positive liberty, he explained, is to take control of one’s own mind; to be liberated from irrational fears and beliefs, from addictions, superstitions and all other forms of self-coercion.”
  10. #43
    “We were the people who were not in the papers. We lived in the blank white spaces at the edges of print. It gave us more freedom.
    “We lived in the gaps between the stories.”
  11. #44
    “I know zoos are no longer in people’s good graces. Religion faces the same problem. Certain illusions about freedom plague them both.”
Books about slaveryView All ››
Abe's Honest Words book
7.0
picture book
Abe's Honest Words
Freedom Soup book
5.2
picture book
Freedom Soup
So Tall Within book
5.0
picture book
So Tall Within
The Bell Rang book
4.9
picture book
The Bell Rang
I Am Abraham Lincoln book
4.5
picture book
I Am Abraham Lincoln
Looking at Lincoln book
4.3
picture book
Looking at Lincoln
  1. #45
    “Decisions were a delight after the curse. I loved having the power to say yes or no, and refusing anything was a special pleasure.”
  2. #46
    But of course he is doing now of his own free will what we could not make him do before.
  3. #47
    “There is more than one kind of freedom,” said Aunt Lydia. “Freedom to and freedom from. In the days of anarchy, it was freedom to. Now you are being given freedom from. Don’t underrate it.”
  4. #48
    “No wife wanting new linoleum. No relatives pulling at him with watery old eyes. No one to care about, which is what makes him free enough to be a good con man.”
  5. #49
    “I didn’t say yes. I can say no to anything I say vile, and I don’t have to count the cost. But because you said yes, all that you can do, for all your crown and your trappings, and your guards—all that your can do is to have me killed.”
    author
    Sophocles
    book
    Antigone
    characters
    CreonAntigone
    concepts
    PowerFreedom
  6. #50
    “At long last he was unencumbered, emancipated from the stifling world of his parents and peers, a world of abstraction and security and material excess, a world in which he felt grievously cut off from the raw throb of existence.”
  7. #51
    “But in bed, before I fell asleep, I’d imagine what I would do if I were free of Lucinda’s curse. At dinner I’d paint lines of gravy on my face and hurl meat pasties at Manners Mistress. I’d pile Headmistress’s best china on my head and walk with a wobble and a swagger till every piece was smashed. Then I’d collect the smashed pottery and the smashed meat pasties and grind them into all my perfect stitchery.”
  8. #52
    “Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.”
  9. #53
    “It was on his grave, my friends, that I resolved, before God, that I would never own another slave, while it is possible to free him; that nobody, through me, should ever run the risk of being parted from home and friends, and dying on a lonely plantation, as he died. So, when you rejoice in your freedom, think that you owe it to that good old soul, and pay it back in kindness to his wife and children. Think of your freedom, every time you see uncle tom’s cabin; and let it be a memorial to put you all in mind to follow in his steps, and be as honest and faithful and Christian as he was.”
  10. #54
    “You call yourself a free spirit, a wild thing, and you’re terrified somebody’s gonna stick you in a cage--well, baby you’re already in that cage. You built it yourself. And it’s not bounded in the West by Tulip, Texas, or on the East by Somaliland--it’s wherever you go, because no matter where you run, you just end up running into yourself.”
  11. #55
    “Every faction conditions its members to think and act a certain way. And most people do it. For most people, it’s not hard to learn, to find a pattern of thought that works and stay that way.” She touches my uninjured shoulder and smiles. “But our minds move in a dozen different directions. We can’t be confined to one way of thinking, and that terrifies our leaders. It means we can’t be controlled. And it means that no matter what they do, we will always cause trouble for them.”
  12. #56
    “Take special care that your thoughts remain unfettered. One may be a free man and yet be bound tighter than a slave.”
  13. #57
    “I’ll fight when needed, revel when there’s occasion, mourn when there is grief, and die if my time comes … but I will not let anyone use me against my will.”
  14. #58
    “George said wonderingly, ‘S’pose they was a carnival or a circus come to town, or a ball game, . . . We’d just go to her . . . We wouldn’t ask nobody if we could. Jus’ say, ‘We’ll go to her,’ an’ we would. Jus’ milk the cow and sling some grain to the chickens an’ go to her.‘”
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