concept

Race Quotes

16 of the best book quotes about race
  1. #1
    “All my fond love thus do I blow to heaven.
    ‘Tis gone.
    Arise, black vengeance, from the hollow hell!”
    author
    Shakespeare
    book
    Othello
    character
    Othello
    concept
    Race
  2. #2
    “It wasn’t northern agitators who pushed Negroes to question their country, as so many southern whites wanted to believe. It was their own pride, their patriotism, their deep and abiding belief in the possibility of democracy that inspired the Negro people. And why not? Who knew American democracy more intimately than the Negro people? They knew democracy’s every virtue, vice, and shortcoming, its voice and contour, by its profound and persistent absence in their lives. The failure to secure the blessings of democracy was the feature that most defined their existence in America. Every Sunday they made their way to their sanctuaries and fervently prayed to the Lord to send them a sign that democracy would come to them.”
  3. #3
    “Negro life in America was a never-ending series of negotiations: when to fight and when to concede.”
  4. #4
    “Their dark skin, their gender, their economic status--none of those were acceptable excuses for not giving the fullest rein to their imaginations and ambitions.”
  5. #5
    If growing up is painful for the Southern Black girl, being aware of her displacement is the rust on the razor that threatens the throat. It is an unnecessary insult.
  6. #6
    “I knew from my own life experience that when someone shows genuine interest in your learning and development, even if only for ten minutes in a busy day, it matters. It matters especially for women, for minorities, for anyone society is quick to overlook.”
  7. #7
    “As fantastical as America’s space ambitions might have seemed, sending a man into space was starting to feel like a straightforward task compared to putting black and white students together in the same Virginia classrooms.”
  8. #8
    “Even as a professional in an integrated world, I had been the only black woman in enough drawing rooms and boardrooms to have an inkling of the chutzpah it took for an African American woman in a segregated southern workplace to tell her bosses she was sure her calculations would put a man on the Moon.”
Books by Margot Lee ShetterlyView All ››
Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race book
5.0
Coretta Scott King Award Winners · Female Scientists · famous people · outer space · jobs and careers · Martin Luther King, Jr. · historical figures · civil rights movement
Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race
Female Scientists · outer space · female role models · computers · math · African Americans
Hidden Figures Young Readers' Edition
  1. #9
    “What she wouldn’t have given for her father to see her—to see his baby girl who used to count the stars now sending men to travel among them. Joshua Coleman knew as if from second sight that Katherine, his brilliant, charismatic, inquisitive youngest child—a black girl from rural West Virginia, born at a time when the odds were more likely that she would die before age thirty-five than even finish high school—would somehow, someday, unite her story with the great epic of America.”
  2. #10
    “She, in spite of nature,
    Of years, of country, credit, every thing,
    To fall in love with what she feared to look on!
    It is a judgment maimed and most imperfect
    That will confess perfection so could err
    Against all rules of nature.”
  3. #11
    “The at-home mother’s life: it was a race with no finish line.”
  4. #12
    “What I wanted was for them to have a grand, sweeping narrative that they deserved, the kind of American history that belongs to the Wright Brothers and the astronauts, to Alexander Hamilton and Martin Luther King Jr. Not told as a separate history, but as part of the story we all know. Not at the margins, but at the very center, the protagonists of the drama. And not just because they are black, or because they are women, but because they are part of the American epic.”
  5. #13
    “They wore their professional clothes like armor. They wielded their work like weapons, warding off the presumption of inferiority because they were Negro or female.”
  6. #14
    “Wasn’t that the point of the book? For women to realize, We are just two people. Not that much separates us. Not nearly as much as I’d thought.”
    author
    Kathryn Stockett
    person
    Women
    book
    The Help
    character
    Skeeter
    concepts
    EqualityRace
  7. #15
    “Where my culture I’m told holds no significance
    I’ll wither and die in ignorance
    But my inner eye can c a race
    who reigned as kings in another place”
  8. #16
    “Since stepping reluctantly into public life, I’ve been held up as the most powerful woman in the world and taken down as an “angry black woman.” I’ve wanted to ask my detractors which part of that phrase matters to them the most—is it “angry” or “black” or “woman”?”
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