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prejudices Quotes

47 of the best book quotes about prejudices
  1. #1
    “Soldiers and civilians, intensely propagandized by their government, usually carried their own caustic prejudices about their enemies, seeing them as brutish, subhuman beasts or fearsome ‘Anglo-Saxon devils.’ This racism, and the hatred and fear it fomented served as an accelerant for the abuse of Allied prisoners.”
  2. #2
    “’My friend,’ said the orator to him, ‘do you believe the Pope to be Anti-Christ?’
    ‘I have not heard it,’ answered Candide; ‘but whether he be, or whether he be not, I want bread.’
    ‘Thou dost not deserve to eat,’ said the other. ‘Begone, rogue; begone, wretch; do not come near me again.’
    The orator’s wife, putting her head out of the window, and spying a man that doubted whether the Pope was Anti-Christ, poured over him a full.... Oh, heavens! to what excess does religious zeal carry the ladies.
  3. #3
    “I know you now, old enemies of mine!
    Falsehood! . . . Have at you! Ha! and Compromise!
    Prejudice, Treachery!. . .
    Surrender, I?
    Parley? No, never! You too, Folly,—you?
    I know that you will lay me low at last;
    Let be! Yet I fall fighting, fighting still!”
  4. #4
    “Maybe at birth everyone should be given to a family of a different race to be raised. Maybe that would solve racism once and for all.”
  5. #5
    “I couldn’t understand why he was home all day, when Mama had to go out working. I was ashamed of him for that and, in a deeper way, for being what had led to our imprisonment, that is, for being so unalterably Japanese.”
  6. #6
    “The band teacher knew I had more experience than anyone else competing that year . . . But he was afraid to use me. He had to go speak to the board about it, and to some of the parents, to see if it was allowable for an Oriental to represent the high school in such a visible way.”
  7. #7
    “I smiled and sat down, suddenly aware of what being of Japanese ancestry was going to be like. I wouldn’t be faced with physical attack, or with overt shows of hatred. Rather, I would be seen as someone foreign, or as someone other than American, or perhaps not be seen at all.”
  8. #8
    “It would have been impossible, completely and entirely, for any woman to have written the plays of Shakespeare in the age of Shakespeare.”
  9. #9
    “I have been living in this country nine years longer than you have. Do you realize that? Yet I am prevented by law from becoming a citizen. I am prevented by law from owning land. I am now separated from my family without cause.”
  1. #10
    “Thus our tender minds, fettered by the prejudices and habits of a just servitude, are unable to expand themselves, or to attain that well-proportioned greatness which we admire in the ancients.”
  2. #11
    “It’s funny how you forget the rules. She was not supposed to be inside here. Every time a rumor got going about a group of Negroes coming to worship with us on Sunday morning, the deacons stood locked-arms across the church stems to turn them away. We loved them in the Lord, Brother Gerald said, but they had their own places.”
  3. #12
    ″. . . I looked around me, and it was like seeing everything through a train’s thick window. A blur passed before me. A moving wave of color. ‘I am not one of you,’ I thought.”
  4. #13
    ″‘But you should have told me where you were, love!’
    Sophie knew she should have. She had taken Martha’s view of Fanny, whole and entire, when she should have known Fanny better. She was ashamed.”
  5. #14
    ″[Mrs. Pentstemmon] had said Sophie was a witch. Oddly enough, Sophie accepted this without any trouble at all. That explained the popularity of certain hats, she thought. It explained Jane Farrier’s Count Whatsit. It possibly explained the jealousy of the Witch of the Waste. It was as if Sophie had always known this. But she had thought it was not proper to have a magic gift because she was the eldest of three. Lettie had been far more sensible about such things.”
  6. #15
    “She wipes her memory instantly and with purpose; it’s a way of preserving herself.”
  7. #16
    “You know, my whole life changed after I fell in love. It was like the sun started shining on me for the first time, and for the first time in my life I began to smile. I was loved, I was loved, and I didn’t care what anyone thought. I wasn’t worried about getting caught, but I did notice that Peter’s friends were terrified of me; they stayed clear anytime I came near them. They’d walk away from me if they saw me walking down the road coming toward them, and if they came into the store, they wouldn’t even look at me. That started to worry me a little but I didn’t worry much.”
  8. #17
    “He hath disgraced me, and
    hindered me half a million; laughed at my losses,
    mocked at my gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my
    bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine
    enemies; and what’s his reason? I am a Jew.”
  9. #18
    “Prejudice, a dirty word, and faith, a clean one, have something in common: they both begin where reason ends.”

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  1. #19
    “You deny them hope. Any man in this world, Atticus, any man who has a head and arms and legs, was born with hope in his heart. You won’t find that in the Constitution, I picked that up in church somewhere. They are simple people, most of them, but that doesn’t make them subhuman.”
  2. #20
    “The arousing of prejudice, pity, anger, and similar emotions has nothing to do with the essential facts, but is merely a personal appeal to the man who is judging the case.”
  3. #21
    ″Should we distrust the man because his manners are not our manners, and that his skin is dark?”
  4. #22
    “What they were seeing was black.”
  5. #23
    “The genius of apartheid was convincing people who were the overwhelming majority to turn on each other. Apart hate, is what it was. You separate people into groups and make them hate one another so you can run them all.”
  6. #24
    “‘Heaven protect me from a prejudice so unworthy of my reason!’ returned Duncan, at the same time conscious of such a feeling, and that as deeply rooted as if it had been engrafted in his nature.”
  7. #25
    “I am not a prejudiced man, nor one who vaunts himself on his natural privileges, though the worst enemy I have on earth, and he is an Iroquois, daren’t deny that I am genuine white.”
  8. #26
    “Twould have been a cruel and an unhuman act for a white-skin; but ‘tis the gift and natur’ of an Indian, and I suppose it should not be denied.”
  9. #27
    “Do you have a different name for killing when you wear a uniform to do it?”
  1. #28
    ″‘And I tell you that he who is born a Mingo will die a Mingo,’ returned the other, positively. ‘A Mohawk! No give me a Delaware...‘”
  2. #29
    “Negroes do not, strictly or legally speaking, exist in any other [country]. ”
  3. #30
    “You can only be destroyed by believing that you really are what the white world calls a nigger.”
  4. #31
    “Human beings are poor examiners, subject to superstition, bias, prejudice, and a PROFOUND tendency to see what they want to see rather than what is really there.”
  5. #32
    “Prejudices, it is well known, are most difficult to eradicate from the heart whose soil has never been loosened or fertilised by education: they grow there, firm as weeds among stones.”
  6. #33
    “This was a great revelation—not that I was white but that it seemed like June might not want me here because of my skin color. I hadn’t known this was possible—to reject people for being white.”
  7. #34
    “T. Ray did not think colored women were smart. Since I want to tell the whole truth, which means the worst parts, I thought they could be smart, but not as smart as me, me being white. Lying on the cot in the honey house, though, all I could think was August is so intelligent, so cultured, and I was surprised by this. That’s what let me know I had some prejudice buried inside me.”
  8. #35
    “But I will tell you this secret thing, which not one of them saw, not even August, the thing that brought me the most cause for gladness. It was how Sugar-Girl said what she did, like I was truly one of them. Not one person in the room said, ‘Sugar-Girl, really, talking about white people like that and we have a white person present.’ They didn’t even think of me being different.”
  9. #36
    ″‘We can’t think of changing our skin,’ he said. ‘Change the world—that’s how we gotta think.‘”

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  1. #37
    How quick come the reasons for approving what we like.
  2. #38
    See how elastic our prejudices grow when once love comes to bend them.
  3. #39
    “I remember hearing you once say, Mr. Darcy, that you hardly ever forgave, that your resentment once created was unappeasable. You are very cautious, I suppose, as to its being created.”
    “I am,” said he, with a firm voice.
    “And never allow yourself to be blinded by prejudice?”
    “I hope not.”
  4. #40
    “Well sped, my boy, before the world had dubbed your ambition insolence, had held your ideals unattainable, and taught you to cringe and bow.”
  5. #41
    “The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what’s true.”
  6. #42
    “Nurse: Yes, now (Medea) knows at a terrible first hand what it is to miss one’s native land.”
  7. #43
    “Medea: Because I have a little knowledge,
    some are filled with jealousy,
    others think me secretive, and crazy. ”
  8. #44
    “We cannot merely pray to You, O God, To root out prejudice, For You have already given us eyes With which to see the good in all men If we would only use them rightly.”
  9. #45
    “Jason: So…this is not the first time
    I have seen irrevocable damage done
    by a barbarous rage.”
  10. #46
    “The Syrians and Lebanese are called ‘those foreigners’ even though most of them have acquired Antiguan citizenship.”
  11. #47
    “Show me a man or a woman alone and I’ll show you a saint. Give me two and they’ll fall in love. Give me three and they’ll invent the charming thing we call ‘society’. Give me four and they’ll build a pyramid. Give me five and they’ll make one an outcast. Give me six and they’ll reinvent prejudice. Give me seven and in seven years they’ll reinvent warfare. Man may have been made in the image of God, but human society was made in the image of His opposite number, and is always trying to get back home.”
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