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Friedrich Nietszche Quotes

42 of the best book quotes from Friedrich Nietszche
  1. #1
    “He who fights with monsters should be careful lest he thereby become a monster. And if thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will also gaze into thee.”
  2. #2
    “Courage, however, and adventure, and delight in the uncertain, in the unattempted—COURAGE seemeth to me the entire primitive history of man.”
  3. #3
    “I have departed from the house of the scholars, and the door have I also slammed behind me. Too long did my soul sit hungry at their table: not like them have I got the knack of investigating, as the knack of nut-cracking. Freedom do I love, and the air over fresh soil; rather would I sleep on ox-skins than on their honours and dignities.”
  4. #4
    “It is true we love life; not because we are wont to live, but because we are wont to love. There is always some madness in love. But there is always, also, some method in madness.”
  5. #5
    “Hearken rather, my brethren, to the voice of the healthy body; it is a more upright and pure voice. More uprightly and purely speaketh the healthy body, perfect and square-built; and it speaketh of the meaning of the earth.”
  6. #6
    “Lift up your hearts, my brethren, high, higher! And do not forget your legs! Lift up also your legs, ye good dancers, and better still if ye stand upon your heads!”
  7. #7
    “‘Zarathustra’ is my brother’s most personal work; it is the history of his most individual experiences, of his friendships, ideals, raptures, bitterest disappointments and sorrows. Above it all, however, there soars, transfiguring it, the image of his greatest hopes and remotest aims.”
  8. #8
    “For fear—that is man’s original and fundamental feeling; through fear everything is explained, original sin and original virtue.”
  9. #9
    “My shadow calleth me? What matter about my shadow! Let it run after me! I—run away from it.”
  10. #10
    “Call me however what thou wilt—I am who I must be. I call myself Zarathustra.”

Books about love

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More Than Balloons book
Board book
6.2
The Rag Coat book
Picture book
6.1
The Trumpet of the Swan book
Chapter book
6.0
Three Little Words book
Picture book
6.0
Spot Loves His Daddy book
Board book
6.0
Penguin and Pinecone book
Board book
6.0
All the Places to Love book
Picture book
6.0
Wherever You Are book
Picture book
5.9
  1. #11
    “In my domain shall no one come to grief; my cave is a good haven. And best of all would I like to put every sorrowful one again on firm land and firm legs.”
  2. #12
    “Mine eagle is awake, and like me honoureth the sun. With eagle-talons doth it grasp at the new light. Ye are my proper animals; I love you. But still do I lack my proper men!”
  3. #13
    “He whom the flame of jealousy encompasseth, turneth at last, like the scorpion, the poisoned sting against himself.”
  4. #14
    “Is not wounded vanity the mother of all tragedies? Where, however, pride is wounded, there there groweth up something better than pride.”
  5. #15
    “For nothing is more precious to me, and rarer, than honesty.”
  6. #16
    “I became weary of the poets, of the old and of the new: superficial are they all unto me, and shallow seas. They did not think sufficiently into the depth; therefore their feeling did not reach to the bottom.”
  7. #17
    “Ah, my friends! I should have something more to say unto you! I should have something more to give unto you! Why do I not give it? Am I then a niggard?”
  8. #18
    “Of all that is written, I love only what a person hath written with his blood. Write with blood, and thou wilt find that blood is spirit.”
  9. #19
    “Ye are only bridges: may higher ones pass over upon you! Ye signify steps: so do not upbraid him who ascendeth beyond you into HIS height!”
  10. #20
    “Let thy virtue be too high for the familiarity of names, and if thou must speak of it, be not ashamed to stammer about it.”

Books about pride

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  1. #21
    “Of all that is written, I love only what a person hath written with his blood. Write with blood, and thou wilt find that blood is spirit.”
  2. #22
    “Be not virtuous beyond your powers! And seek nothing from yourselves opposed to probability! Walk in the footsteps in which your fathers’ virtue hath already walked! How would ye rise high, if your fathers’ will should not rise with you?”
  3. #23
    “The greater part of the conscious thinking of a philosopher is secretly influenced by his instincts, and forced into definite channels.”
  4. #24
    “To talk much about oneself may also be a means of concealing oneself.”
  5. #25
    “Objection, evasion, joyous distrust, and love of irony are signs of health; everything absolute belongs to pathology.”
  6. #26
    “Love brings to light the noble and hidden qualities of a lover—his rare and exceptional traits: it is thus liable to be deceptive as to his normal character.”
  7. #27
    “It seems that in order to inscribe themselves upon the heart of humanity with everlasting claims, all great things have first to wander about the earth as enormous and awe-inspiring caricatures.”
  8. #28
    “HOW COULD anything originate out of its opposite? For example, truth out of error?
  9. #29
    “The fundamental belief of metaphysicians is THE BELIEF IN ANTITHESES OF VALUES.”
  10. #30
    “In spite of all the value which may belong to the true, the positive, and the unselfish, it might be possible that a higher and more fundamental value for life generally should be assigned to pretence, to the will to delusion, to selfishness, and cupidity. It might even be possible that WHAT constitutes the value of those good and respected things, consists precisely in their being insidiously related, knotted, and crocheted to these evil and apparently opposed things—perhaps even in being essentially identical with them.”
  1. #31
    “The sense of the tragic increases and declines with sensuousness.”
  2. #32
    “The belly is the reason why man does not so readily take himself for a God.”
  3. #33
    “TO RECOGNISE UNTRUTH AS A CONDITION OF LIFE; that is certainly to impugn the traditional ideas of value in a dangerous manner, and a philosophy which ventures to do so, has thereby alone placed itself beyond good and evil.”
  4. #34
    “The spectacle of the Tartuffery of old Kant, equally stiff and decent, with which he entices us into the dialectic by-ways that lead (more correctly mislead) to his “categorical imperative”—makes us fastidious ones smile, we who find no small amusement in spying out the subtle tricks of old moralists and ethical preachers.”
  5. #35
    “It has gradually become clear to me what every great philosophy up till now has consisted of—namely, the confession of its originator, and a species of involuntary and unconscious auto-biography.”
  6. #36
    “But this is an old and everlasting story: what happened in old times with the Stoics still happens today, as soon as ever a philosophy begins to believe in itself. It always creates the world in its own image; it cannot do otherwise; philosophy is this tyrannical impulse itself, the most spiritual Will to Power, the will to “creation of the world,” the will to the causa prima.”
  7. #37
    “A living thing seeks above all to DISCHARGE its strength—life itself is WILL TO POWER; self-preservation is only one of the indirect and most frequent RESULTS thereof.”
  8. #38
    “Insanity in individuals is something rare—but in groups, parties, nations, and epochs it is the rule.”
  9. #39
    “Around the hero everything becomes a tragedy; around the demigod everything becomes a satyr-play; and around God everything becomes—what? perhaps a ‘world’?”
  10. #40
    “Not only our reason, but also our conscience, truckles to our strongest impulse—the tyrant in us.”
  11. #41
    “I want to have goblins about me, for I am courageous.”
  12. #42
    “Poets act shamelessly towards their experiences: they exploit them.”
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