concept

gods Quotes

51 of the best book quotes about gods
  1. #1
    ″‘Excuse me,’ said the Cat very politely, ‘but this interests me. Does your friend from Calormen say the same?’
    ‘Assuredly,’ said the Calormene. ‘The enlightened Ape--Man, I mean--is in the right. Aslan means neither less nor more than Tash.’
    ‘Especially, Aslan means no more than Tash?’ suggested the Cat.
    ‘No more at all,’ said the Calormene, looking the Cat straight in the face.
    ‘Is that good enough for you, Ginger?’ said the Ape.
    ‘Oh certainly,’ said Ginger cooly, ‘Thank you very much. I only wanted to be quite clear. I think I am beginning to understand.‘”
  2. #2
    “In school, we learned about the world before ours, about the angels and gods that lived in the sky, ruling the earth with kind and loving hands. Some say those are just stories, but I don’t believe that.
    The gods rule us still. They have come down from the stars. And they are no longer kind.”
  3. #3
    “Fixed ideas of God and human nature are indispensable to the daily practice of men’s lives; but the practice of their lives prevents them from acquiring such ideas.”
  4. #4
    “’It is more likely,’ said he, ‘mankind have a little corrupted nature, for they were not born wolves, and they have become wolves; God has given them neither cannon of four-and-twenty pounders, nor bayonets; and yet they have made cannon and bayonets to destroy one another. Into this account I might throw not only bankrupts, but Justice which seizes on the effects of bankrupts to cheat the creditors.’”
  5. #5
    “’You see,’ said Candide to Martin, ‘that crime is sometimes punished. This rogue of a Dutch skipper has met with the fate he deserved.’
    ‘Yes,’ said Martin; ‘but why should the passengers be doomed also to destruction? God has punished the knave, and the devil has drowned the rest.’”
  6. #6
    “The blessed gods
    Purge all infection from our air whilst you
    Do climate here!
  7. #7
    “Not Helen’s face, nor Paris, was in fault; But by the gods was this destruction brought.”
    author
    Virgil
    book
    The Aenid
    character
    Venus
    concepts
    Godsfatedestruction
  8. #8
    “Can heav’nly minds such high resentment show, Or exercise their spite in human woe?”
  9. #9
    “Gods of the liquid realms, on which I row! If, giv’n by you, the laurel bind my brow, Assist to make me guilty of my vow! A snow-white bull shall on your shore be slain; His offer’d entrails cast into the main, And ruddy wine, from golden goblets thrown, Your grateful gift and my return shall own.”
  10. #10
    “‘I certainly admire your attitude,’ Talkative said. ‘For you speak with conviction; and I might add, what else is so pleasant and so profitable as to talk about the things of God? For instance, if a man delights in such wonderful things as that, what could be more pleasurable to talk about than the history or mystery of such things? Or if a man loves to talk about miracles, wonders, or signs, where else will he find such things so delightfully recorded and so sweetly penned as in the Holy Scripture?’ ‘That is true,’ Faithful admitted, ‘but the real purpose of such discussion is that we should be benefited by such things in our talk. That should be our intended focus.‘”
  1. #11
    Funny thing, watching gods realize they’ve been mortal all along.
  2. #12
    “It is a serious thing to live in a society of possible gods and goddesses, to remember that the dullest most uninteresting person you can talk to may one day be a creature which, if you saw it now, you would be strongly tempted to worship, or else a horror and a corruption such as you now meet, if at all, only in a nightmare.”
  3. #13
    “Thy life is safe while any god saves mine.”
  4. #14
    “A blight is on our harvest in the ear, A blight upon the grazing flocks and herds, A blight on wives in travail; and withal Armed with his blazing torch the God of Plague Hath swooped upon our city emptying The house of Cadmus, and the murky realm Of Pluto is full fed with groans and tears.”
  5. #15
    “These are their religious principles:—That the soul of man is immortal, and that God of His goodness has designed that it should be happy; and that He has, therefore, appointed rewards for good and virtuous actions, and punishments for vice, to be distributed after this life.”
  6. #16
    “Ah, woe is me! where shall I fly, where find Succor from gods or men?”
  7. #17
    “They both distrust the advice of heaven; but what harm will it do to try?”
  8. #18
    “It is high time for thee to understand the true nature both of the world, whereof thou art a part; and of that Lord and Governor of the world, from whom, as a channel from the spring, thou thyself didst flow: and that there is but a certain limit of time appointed unto thee, which if thou shalt not make use of to calm and allay the many distempers of thy soul, it will pass away and thou with it, and never after return.”
  9. #19
    “Yea, for these laws were not ordained of Zeus, And she who sits enthroned with gods below, Justice, enacted not these human laws. Nor did I deem that thou, a mortal man, Could’st by a breath annul and override The immutable unwritten laws of Heaven.”
  10. #20
    “And as for death, if there be any gods, it is no grievous thing to leave the society of men.”

Books by Neil Gaiman

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  1. #21
    “But, whether true or false, my opinion is that in the world of knowledge the idea of good appears last of all, and is seen only with an effort; and, when seen, is also inferred to be the universal author of all things beautiful and right, parent of light and of the lord of light in this visible world, and the immediate source of reason and truth in the intellectual; and that this is the power upon which he who would act rationally either in public or private life must have his eye fixed.”
  2. #22
    “But if it be so that there be no gods, or that they take no care of the world, why should I desire to live in a world void of gods, and of all divine providence?”
  3. #23
    “But gods there be certainly, and they take care for the world; and as for those things which be truly evil, as vice and wickedness, such things they have put in a man’s own power, that he might avoid them if he would: and had there been anything besides that had been truly bad and evil, they would have had a care of that also, that a man might have avoided it.”
  4. #24
    “This was a man who moved like the gods were watching: every gesture he made was upright and correct. There was no one else it could be but Hector”
  5. #25
    “Maybe her gods are kinder than ours, and she will find rest”
  6. #26
    “Around the hero everything becomes a tragedy; around the demigod everything becomes a satyr-play; and around God everything becomes—what? perhaps a ‘world’?”
  7. #27
    ″‘Just because I do not accept the teachings of the devotaries does not mean I’ve discarded a belief in right and wrong.
    ...
    Must someone, some unseen thing, declare what is right for it to be right? I believe that my own morality -- which answers only to my heart -- is more sure and true than the morality of those who do right only because they fear retribution.‘”
  8. #28
    “They were fire-makers! They were gods! ”
  9. #29
    “I know you think mortality is evidence that they don’t care, but giving us the ability to grow and change and progress and then finish? That was the greatest gift two ageless, eternal, very very stuck gods could think to give the children they love more than anything.”
  10. #30
    “God is saying to you what He said to Sarai, ‘I want you to change your name to Princess’ - not literally, but in your attitude. You have to shake off the negative things people have said about you. Shake off the low self-esteem and the inferiority and start carrying yourself like a princess. Start walking like a princess. Start talking like a princess. Start thinking like a princess. Start waving like a princess!”
  1. #31
    “Where there is no judge on earth, the appeal lies to God in heaven.”
  2. #32
    “‘Think about it, Cath. That’s what makes a god—or a mother. There’s nothing more intoxicating than creating something from nothing. Creating something from yourself.’”
  3. #33
    “This was a place of deep silence and brooding shadows, and the gods who lived here had no names.”
  4. #34
    As flies to wanton boys are we to th’ gods;
    They kill us for their sport.
  5. #35
    Now, gods, stand up for bastards!
  6. #36
    “We rode here in their minds, and we took root.”
  7. #37
    “Gods die. And when they truly die they are unmourned and unremembered. Ideas are more difficult to kill than people, but they can be killed, in the end.”
  8. #38
    “The rising and setting of the sun was once attributed to Helios and a flaming chariot. Earthquakes and tidal waves were the wrath of Poseidon. Science has now proven those gods to be false idols. Soon all gods will be proven to be false idols. Science has now provided answers to almost every question man can ask.”
  9. #39
    ″‘Gods are great,’ said Atsula, slowly, as if she were comprehending a great secret. ‘But the heart is greater. For it is from our hearts they come, and to our hearts they shall return . . .‘”
  10. #40
    “Its like bees and honey. Each bee makes only a tiny, tiny drop of honey. It takes thousands of them, millions perhaps, all working together to make the pot of honey you have on your breakfast table. Now imagine that you could eat nothing but honey. That’s what it’s like for my kind of people…we feed on belief, on prayers, on love. It takes a lot of people believing just the tiniest bit to sustain us.”

Books about love

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More Than Balloons book
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6.2
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The Rag Coat book
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6.1
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Three Little Words book
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6.0
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All the Places to Love book
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6.0
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Spot Loves His Daddy book
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6.0
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The Trumpet of the Swan book
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6.0
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Penguin and Pinecone book
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Charlotte and the Rock book
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  1. #41
    “This is not a good country for gods.”
  2. #42
    “Mrs. Turner, like all other believers had built an altar to the unattainable – Caucasian characteristics for all. Her god would smite her, would hurl her from pinnacles and lose her in deserts, but she would not forsake his altars. Behind her crude words was a belief that somehow she and others through worship could attain her paradise – a heaven of staighthaired, thin-lipped, high-nose boned white seraphs. The physical impossibilities in no way injured faith. That was the mystery and the mysteries are the chores of gods. Beyond her faith was a fanaticism to defend the altars of her gods. It was distressing to emerge from her inner temple and find these black desecrators howling with laughter before the door. Oh, for an army, terrible with banners and swords! ”
  3. #43
    “This is very similar to the suggestion put forward by the Quirmian philosopher Ventre, who said, “Possibly the gods exist, and possibly they do not. So why not believe in them in any case? If it’s all true you’ll go to a lovely place when you die, and if it isn’t then you’ve lost nothing, right?” When he died he woke up in a circle of gods holding nasty-looking sticks.”
  4. #44
    “Gods always behave like the people who make them.”
  5. #45
    “The gods do not limit men. Men limit men.”
  6. #46
    “Loud, heap miseries upon us yet entwine our arts with laughters low!”
  7. #47
    “But the pearls were accidents, and the finding of one was luck, a little pat on the back by God or the gods or both.”
  8. #48
    “The gods wrote in the world a law for all to follow, but it cannot apply to me because I’m their equal. Therefore I will live outside this law and grow without limit. To be limited is evil.”
  9. #49
    “Man became man by living in the hands of the gods.”
  10. #50
    “Just as anyone who listens to the muse will hear, you can write out of your own intention or out of inspiration. There is such a thing. It comes up and talks. And those who have heard deeply the rhythms and hymns of the gods, can recite those hymns in such a way that the gods will be attracted.”
  11. #51
    “Heed my words, all classes of men, you greater and lesser children of Heimdall. You summoned me, Odin, to tell what I recall of the oldest deeds of gods and men.”
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