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Imagination Quotes

29 of the best book quotes about imagination
  1. #1
    “Because when you are imagining, you might as well imagine something worth while.”
  2. #2
    “It’s delightful when your imaginations come true, isn’t it?”
  3. #3
    When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves or figments of their imagination, indeed, everything and anything except me.
  4. #4
    “Imagination is the only weapon in the war with reality.”
  5. #5
    “Isabel was a young person of many theories; her imagination was remarkably active. It had been her fortune to possess a finer mind than most of the persons among whom her lot was cast . . .”
  6. #6
    “There’s nothing wrong with occasionally staring out the window and thinking nonsense, as long as the nonsense is yours.
  7. #7
    Because, you see, if the man were an invention—a fabrication—how much easier to make him disappear!
  8. #8
    I have had a great many troubles, but most of them never happened.
  9. #9
    “Isn’t it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?”
  1. #10
    “If you were only one inch tall, you’d ride a worm to school.
    The teardrop of a crying ant would be your swimming pool.”
  2. #11
    Anything one man can imagine, other men can make real.
  3. #12
    “Her imagination was by habit ridiculously active; when the door was not open it jumped out the window.”
  4. #13
    She rubbed another match on the wall. It burst into a flame, and where its light fell upon the wall it became as transparent as a veil, and she could see into the room. The table was covered with a snowy white table-cloth, on which stood a splendid dinner service, and a steaming roast goose, stuffed with apples and dried plums. And what was still more wonderful, the goose jumped down from the dish and waddled across the floor, with a knife and fork in its breast, to the little girl. Then the match went out, and there remained nothing but the thick, damp, cold wall before her.
  5. #14
    “Isn’t it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive--it’s such an interesting world. It wouldn’t be half so interesting if we know all about everything, would it? There’d be no scope for imagination then, would there?But am I talking too much? People are always telling me I do. Would you rather I didn’t talk? If you say so I’ll stop. I can STOP when I make up my mind to it, although it’s difficult.”
  6. #15
    “A lady’s imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.”
  7. #16
    “But the elastic heart of youth cannot be compressed into one constrained shape long at a time. Tom presently began to drift insensibly back into the concerns of his life again. What if he turned his back, now, and disappeared mysteriously? . . . [H]e would join the Indians . . . He would be a pirate! That was it! Now his future lay plain before him, and glowing with unimaginable splendor.”
  8. #17
    “It’s all very well to read about sorrows and imagine yourself living through them heroically, but it’s not so nice when you really come to have them, is it?”
  9. #18
    “I call people rich when they are able to gratify their imagination.”
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More Than Balloons book
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Penguin and Pinecone book
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All the Places to Love book
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All the Places to Love
The Trumpet of the Swan book
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  1. #19
    “If something is there, you can only see it with your eyes open, but if it isn’t there, you can see it just as well with your eyes closed. That’s why imaginary things are often easier to see than real ones.”
  2. #20
    ″[I]t is an overactive imagination that turns men into cowards, not a surfeit of fear, as most believe.”
  3. #21
    “All great fighting is the same, Eragon, even as all great warriors are the same. Past a certain point, it does not matter whether you wield a sword, a claw, a tooth, or a tail. It is true, you must be capable with your weapon, but anyone with the time and the inclination can acquire technical proficiency. To achieve greatness, though, that requires artistry. That requires imagination and thoughtfulness, and it is those qualities that the best warriors share, even if, on the surface, they appear completely different.”
  4. #22
    “To achieve greatness, though, that requires artistry. That requires imagination and thoughtfulness, and it is those qualities that the best warriors share, even if, on the surface, they appear completely different.”
  5. #23
    “If we, citizens, do not support our artists, then we sacrifice our imagination on the altar of crude reality and we end up believing in nothing and having worthless dreams.”
  6. #24
    “The lower you are, the higher your mind will want to soar.”
  7. #25
    She lighted another match, and then she found herself sitting under a beautiful Christmas-tree. . . . Thousands of tapers were burning upon the green branches, and colored pictures, like those she had seen in the show-windows, looked down upon it all. The little one stretched out her hand towards them, and the match went out.
  8. #26
    “Life is infinitely stranger than anything which the mind of man could invent. We would not dare to conceive the things which are really mere commonplaces of existence. If we could fly out of that window hand in hand, hover over this great city, gently remove the roofs, and and peep in at the queer things which are going on, the strange coincidences, the plannings, the cross-purposes, the wonderful chains of events, working through generations, and leading to the most outre results, it would make all fiction with its conventionalities and foreseen conclusions most stale and unprofitable.”
  9. #27
    Her little hands were almost frozen with the cold. Ah! perhaps a burning match might be some good, if she could draw it from the bundle and strike it against the wall, just to warm her fingers. She drew one out—“scratch!” how it sputtered as it burnt! It gave a warm, bright light, like a little candle, as she held her hand over it. It was really a wonderful light. It seemed to the little girl that she was sitting by a large iron stove, with polished brass feet and a brass ornament. How the fire burned! and seemed so beautifully warm that the child stretched out her feet as if to warm them, when, lo! the flame of the match went out, the stove vanished, and she had only the remains of the half-burnt match in her hand.
  10. #28
    “The pedagogue’s mouth watered, as he looked upon this sumptuous promise of luxurious winter fare. In his devouring mind’s eye, he pictured to himself every roasting-pig running about with a pudding in his belly, and an apple in his mouth; the pigeons were snugly put to bed in a comfortable pie, and tucked in with a coverlet of crust; the geese were swimming in their own gravy; and the ducks pairing cosily in dishes, like snug married couples, with a decent competency of onion sauce.”
  11. #29
    “Formulate and stamp indelibly on your mind a mental picture of yourself as succeeding. Hold this picture tenaciously. Never permit it to fade. Your mind will seek to develop the picture. . . . Do not build up obstacles in your imagination.”
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Sweet Dreams book
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Book Topics › fiction
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