concept

virtue Quotes

54 of the best book quotes about virtue
  1. #1
    “Gentle severity, repulses mild,
    Full of chaste love and pity sorrowing;
    Graceful rebukes, that had the power to bring
    Back to itself a heart by dreams beguiled;
    A tender voice, whose accents undefiled
    Held sweet restraints, all duty honoring;
    The bloom of virtue; purity’s clear spring
    To cleanse away base thoughts and passions wild;
    Divinest eyes to make a lover’s bliss,
    Whether to bridle in the wayward mind
    Lest its wild wanderings should the pathway miss,
    Or else its griefs to soothe, its wounds to bind;
    This sweet completeness of thy life it is
    Which saved my soul; no other peace I find.”
  2. #2
    “My friend, you see how perishable are the riches of this world; there is nothing solid but virtue, and the happiness of seeing Cunegonde once more.”
  3. #3
    “I doubt whether men were more virtuous in aristocratic ages than in others; but they were incessantly talking of the beauties of virtue, and its utility was only studied in secret.”
  4. #4
    “The rarer action is
    In virtue than in vengeance.”
  5. #5
    “Let there be a careful attention to perform the funeral rites to parents, and let them be followed when long gone with the ceremonies of sacrifice;— then the virtue of the people will resume its proper excellence.”
  6. #6
    “Fine words and an insinuating appearance are seldom associated with true virtue.”
  7. #7
    “The superior man does not, even for the space of a single meal, act contrary to virtue. In moments of haste, he cleaves to it. In seasons of danger, he cleaves to it.”
  8. #8
    “The virtuous rest in virtue; the wise desire virtue.”
  9. #9
    “I tell you that virtue is not given by money, but that from virtue comes money and every other good of man, public as well as private.”
  10. #10
    “If the people be led by laws, and uniformity sought to be given them by punishments, they will try to avoid the punishment, but have no sense of shame. ‘If they be led by virtue, and uniformity sought to be given them by the rules of propriety, they will have the sense of shame, and moreover will become good.”
  1. #11
    “He who exercises government by means of his virtue may be compared to the north polar star, which keeps its place and all the stars turn towards it.”
  2. #12
    “Courage, however, and adventure, and delight in the uncertain, in the unattempted—COURAGE seemeth to me the entire primitive history of man.”
  3. #13
    “For fear—that is man’s original and fundamental feeling; through fear everything is explained, original sin and original virtue.”
  4. #14
    “Let thy virtue be too high for the familiarity of names, and if thou must speak of it, be not ashamed to stammer about it.”
  5. #15
    “Be not virtuous beyond your powers! And seek nothing from yourselves opposed to probability! Walk in the footsteps in which your fathers’ virtue hath already walked! How would ye rise high, if your fathers’ will should not rise with you?”
  6. #16
    “The points required in Happiness are found in combination of our account of it. For some think it is virtue, others practical wisdom, others a kind of scientific philosophy; others that it is these, or else some one of them, in combination with pleasure, or at least not independently of it; while others again take in external prosperity. ”
  7. #17
    “That public virtue, which among the ancients was denominated patriotism, is derived from a strong sense of our own interest in the preservation and prosperity of the free government of which we are members. Such a sentiment, which had rendered the legions of the republic almost invincible, could make but a very feeble impression on the mercenary servants of a despotic prince; and it became necessary to supply that defect by other motives, of a different, but not less forcible nature—honor and religion.”
  8. #18
    “Modesty is not one of my virtues. At the time, virtue was not one of my virtues.”
  9. #19
    “For to constitute Happiness, there must be, as we have said, complete virtue and a complete life.”
  10. #20
    “Here at present I felt afresh—for I had felt it again and again—how my equilibrium depended on the success of my rigid will, the will to shut my eyes as tight as possible to the truth that what I had to deal with was, revoltingly, against nature. I could only get on at all by taking “nature” into my confidence and my account, by treating my monstrous ordeal as a push in a direction unusual, of course, and unpleasant, but demanding, after all, for a fair front, only another turn of the screw of ordinary human virtue.”

Books by William Shakespeare

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  1. #21
    “They define virtue thus—that it is a living according to Nature, and think that we are made by God for that end; they believe that a man then follows the dictates of Nature when he pursues or avoids things according to the direction of reason.”
  2. #22
    “This day I shalt have to do with an idle curious man, with an unthankful man, a railer, a crafty, false, or an envious man; an unsociable uncharitable man. All these ill qualities have happened unto them, through ignorance of that which is truly good and truly bad. But I that understand the nature of that which is good, that it only is to be desired, and of that which is bad, that it only is truly odious and shameful: who know moreover, that this transgressor, whosoever he be, is my kinsman, not by the same blood and seed, but by participation of the same reason, and of the same divine particle; How can I either be hurt by any of those, since it is not in their power to make me incur anything that is truly reproachful?”
  3. #23
    “The racehorse, by virtue of his awesome physical gifts, freed the jockey from himself. When a horse and a jockey flew over the track together, there were moments in which the man’s mind wedded itself to the animal’s body to form something greater than the sum of both parts.”
  4. #24
    “They have made Virtue also a goddess, which, indeed, if it could be a goddess, had been preferable to many. And now, because it is not a goddess, but a gift of God, let it be obtained by prayer from Him, by whom alone it can be given.”
  5. #25
    “For even in the likeness of the sufferings, there remains an unlikeness in the sufferers; and though exposed to the same anguish, virtue and vice are not the same thing.”
  6. #26
    “Romans, make way. The good Andronicus,
    Patron of virtue, Rome’s best champion,
    Successful in the battles that he fights,
    With honour and with fortune is return’d.”
  7. #27
    “Fearlessness, singleness of soul, the will
    Always to strive for wisdom; opened hand
    And governed appetites; and piety,
    And love of lonely study; humbleness,
    Uprightness, heed to injure nought which lives,
    Truthfulness, slowness unto wrath, a mind
    That lightly letteth go what others prize;
    And equanimity, and charity
    Which spieth no man’s faults; and tenderness
    Towards all that suffer; a contented heart,
    Fluttered by no desires; a bearing mild,
    Modest, and grave, with manhood nobly mixed,
    With patience, fortitude, and purity;
    An unrevengeful spirit, never given
    To rate itself too high;--such be the signs,
    O Indian Prince! of him whose feet are set
    On that fair path which leads to heavenly birth!”
  8. #28
    “A young person cannot judge what is allegorical and what is literal; anything that he receives into his mind at that age is likely to become indelible and unalterable; and therefore it is most important that the tales which the young first hear should be models of virtuous thoughts.”
  9. #29
    “It is difficult to recognize pride as a sin when it is held up on every side as a virtue, urged as profitable, and rewarded as an achievement.”
  10. #30
    “It is difficult to recognize pride as a sin when it is held up on every side as a virtue, urged as profitable, and rewarded as an achievement.”
  1. #31
    “Birth means nothing where there is no virtue.”
  2. #32
    “It is absurd to hold that a man ought to be ashamed of being unable to defend himself with his limbs, but not of being unable to defend himself with speech and reason, when the use of rational speech is more distinctive of a human being than the use of his limbs.And if it be objected that one who uses such power of speech unjustly might do great harm, that is a charge which may be made in common against all good things except virtue, and above all against the things that are most useful, as strength, health, wealth, generalship. A man can confer the greatest of benefits by a right use of these, and inflict the greatest of injuries by using them wrongly.”
  3. #33
    “Humanity will find in itself the power to live for virtue even without believing in immortality. It will find it in love for freedom, for equality, for fraternity.”
  4. #34
    “Or we fall in love with someone who incarnates the virtues or vices opposite our own. An orderly man who plans his days marries a spontaneous woman who lets things lie where they fall, lives in the moment, and is perpetually late for appointments.”
  5. #35
    “Let not the piece of virtue which is set Betwixt us, as the cement of our love To keep it builded, be the ram to batter The fortress of it. For better might we Have loved without this mean, if on both parts This not be cherished.”
  6. #36
    “Age or virtue may give men a just precedency.”
  7. #37
    “None of my ten friends, even today, ascribes moral evil to Hitler, although most of them think (after the fact) that he made fatal strategical mistakes which even they themselves might have made at the time. His worst mistake was his selection of advisers—a backhand tribute to the Leader’s virtues of trustfulness and loyalty, to his very innocence of the knowledge of evil, fully familiar to those who have heard partisans of F. D. R. or Ike explain how things went wrong.”
  8. #38
    “Skepticism has become a virtue. Cynicism and demand for proof has become enlightened thought. Is it any wonder that humans now feel more depressed and defeated than they have at any point in human history?”
  9. #39
    “Men imagine that they communicate their virtue or vice only by overt actions, and do not see that virtue or vice emit a breath every moment.”
  10. #40
    “Virtues are, in the popular estimate, rather the exception than the rule.”

Books about happiness

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Wonder book
Chapter book
6.3
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Emma book
Board book
6.0
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You Are My Happy book
Picture book
6.0
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Be Happy! book
Board book
5.9
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The Best Bear in All the World book
Chapter book
5.8
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Augustus and His Smile book
Picture book
5.8
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If I Had a Little Dream book
Picture book
5.8
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Pom Pom Panda Gets the Grumps book
Board book
5.3
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  1. #41
    “There is no vice so simple but assumes
    Some mark of virtue on his outward parts.”
  2. #42
    “Invincible: abasht the Devil stood,
    And felt how awful goodness is, and saw
    Vertue in her shape how lovly, saw, and pin’d
    His loss.”
  3. #43
    “As the Nazi emphasis on nonintellectual virtues (patriotism, loyalty, duty, purity, labor, simplicity, ‘blood,’ ‘folk-ishness’) seeped through Germany, elevating the self-esteem of the ‘little man,’ the academic profession was pushed from the very center to the very periphery of society. Germany was preparing to cut its own head off. By 1933 at least five of my ten friends (and I think six or seven) looked upon ‘intellectuals’ as unreliable and, among these unreliables, upon the academics as the most insidiously situated.”
  4. #44
    “Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall.”
  5. #45
    “Then, Isabel, live chaste, and, brother, die.
    More than our brother is our chastity.”
  6. #46
    “Virtue and vice are concepts invented by human beings, words for a morality which human beings arbitrarily devised.”
  7. #47
    “Courage, the universal virtue, is comprehended by us all—but these portraits of courage do not dispel the mysteries of politics.”
  8. #48
    “If we lived in a State where virtue was profitable, common sense would make us good, and greed would make us saintly. And we’d live like animals or angels in the happy land that /needs/ no heroes.”
  9. #49
    “We value virtue but do not discuss it. The honest bookkeeper, the faithful wife, the earnest scholar get little of our attention compared to the embezzler, the tramp, the cheat.”
  10. #50
    “Knowledge is one thing, virtue is another; good sense is not conscience, refinement is not humility, nor is largeness and justness of view faith.”
  11. #51
    “War, not peace, produces virtue. War, not peace, purges vice. War, and preparation for war, call forth all that is noble and honorable in a man. It unites him with his brothers and binds them in selfless love, eradicating in the crucible of necessity all which is base and ignoble.”
  12. #52
    “For what can be more noble than to slay oneself? Not literally. Not with a blade in the guts. But to extinguish the selfish self within, that part which looks only to its own preservation, to save its own skin. ”
  13. #53
    “Let us presuppose this much, that the best way of life both separately for each individual and in common for cities is that accompanied by virtue—virtue that is equipped to such an extent as to allow them to take part in actions that accord with virtue.”
  14. #54
    “They had been brought up to think that the domestic virtues were self-evident and universal; they had been starved of the knowledge that most attracts the young mind: that the crown of life is the exercise of choice”
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