concept

innocence Quotes

44 of the best book quotes about innocence
  1. #1
    “They became acquainted with sorrow and loved sorrow; they thirsted for suffering, and said that truth could only be attained through suffering. Then science appeared. As they became wicked they began talking of brotherhood and humanitarianism, and understood those ideas. As they became criminal, they invented justice and drew up whole legal codes in order to observe it, and to ensure their being kept, set up a guillotine. They hardly remembered what they had lost, in fact refused to believe that they had ever been happy and innocent.”
  2. #2
    “’You see,’ said Candide to Martin, ‘that crime is sometimes punished. This rogue of a Dutch skipper has met with the fate he deserved.’
    ‘Yes,’ said Martin; ‘but why should the passengers be doomed also to destruction? God has punished the knave, and the devil has drowned the rest.’”
  3. #3
    “We were as twinn’d lambs that did frisk i’ the sun,
    And bleat the one at the other: what we changed
    Was innocence for innocence;”
  4. #4
    “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy . . . but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”
  5. #5
    “None of them imagined that a horrible ordeal was drawing nigh. Nobody suspected that by the end of that long day, every minute would matter.”
  6. #6
    “Four hundred vertical feet above, where the summit was still washed in bright sunlight under an immaculate cobalt sky, my compadres dallied to memorialize their arrival at the apex of the planet, unfurling flags and snapping photos, using up precious ticks of the clock.”
  7. #7
    “It wasn’t my fault. He hurt me. It wasn’t my fault. And I’m not going to let it kill me. I can grow.”
  8. #8
    “Sibyl? Oh, she was so shy and so gentle. There is something of a child about her. Her eyes opened wide in exquisite wonder when I told her what I thought of her performance, and she seemed quite unconscious of her power.”
  9. #9
    ″‘You fool,’ said Lupin softly. ‘Is a schoolboy grudge worth putting an innocent man back inside Azkaban?‘”
  10. #10
    “I want you to know, Stanley, that I respect you,” Mr. Pendanski said. “I understand you’ve made some bad mistakes in your life. Otherwise you wouldn’t be here. But everyone makes mistakes. You may have done some bad things, but that doesn’t mean you’re a bad kid.”
    Stanley nodded. It seemed pointless to try and tell his counselor that he was innocent. He figured that everyone probably said that.
  11. #11
    “I will love you as misfortune loves orphans, as fire loves innocence, and as justice loves to sit and watch while everything goes wrong.”
  1. #12
    “Arthur was happy. Like the man in Eden before the fall, he was enjoying his innocence and fortune.”
  2. #13
    ″...but it seems, in tragedy, that innocence is not enough.”
  3. #14
    “They had never been there in the dark. But there was enough moon for them to find their way into the castle, and he could tell her about his day in Washington. And apologize. It had been so dumb of him not to ask if Leslie could go, too.”
  4. #15
    “When you’re living in the reality of the forgiveness you been extended, you just don’t get angry with others easily. I suspect our sense of entitlement to anger is directly proportional to our perception of our own relative innocence.”
  5. #16
    “It would have been impossible to carry a bad name with a greater sweetness of innocence, and by the time I had got back to Bly with him I remained merely bewildered—so far, that is, as I was not outraged—by the sense of the horrible letter locked up in my room, in a drawer. As soon as I could compass a private word with Mrs. Grose I declared to her that it was grotesque.
    She promptly understood me. ‘You mean the cruel charge—?’
    ‘It doesn’t live an instant. My dear woman, LOOK at him!‘”
  6. #17
    “Suddenly, in these circumstances, I became aware that, on the other side of the Sea of Azof, we had an interested spectator... My heart had stood still for an instant with the wonder and terror of the question whether she too would see; and I held my breath while I waited for what a cry from her, what some sudden innocent sign either of interest or of alarm, would tell me. I waited, but nothing came...”
  7. #18
    “To gaze into the depths of blue of the child’s eyes and pronounce their loveliness a trick of premature cunning was to be guilty of a cynicism in preference to which I naturally preferred to abjure my judgment and, so far as might be, my agitation. I couldn’t abjure for merely wanting to, but I could repeat to Mrs. Grose—as I did there, over and over, in the small hours—that with their voices in the air, their pressure on one’s heart, and their fragrant faces against one’s cheek, everything fell to the ground but their incapacity and their beauty.”
  8. #19
    “I meant no harm. I most truly did not. But I had to grow bigger. So bigger I got.”
  9. #20
    “As you perceive, the only person responsible for the couple’s offense escaped; and not only escaped but became the executioner of the innocent.”
  10. #21
    “I didn’t know what to do or say. In a matter of seconds it seemed, I had gone from being angered by her strength, to being amazed by her innocence, and then frightened by her vulnerability. And now I felt numb, strangely weak, as if someone had unplugged me and the current running through me had stopped.”
  11. #22
    ″‘Then you must teach my daughter this same lesson. How to lose your innocence but not your hope. How to laugh forever.‘”

Books about grief

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Grandpa's Top Threes book
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6.4
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Ida, Always book
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6.0
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A Stopwatch from Grampa book
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5.3
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Something Very Sad Happened book
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5.0
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Where Lily Isn't book
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The Rough Patch book
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Dance Like a Leaf book
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4.8
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The Goodbye Book book
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  1. #23
    “When a child first catches adults out—when it first walks into his grave little head that adults do not have divine intelligence, that their judgments are not always wise, their thinking true, their sentences just—his world falls into panic desolation. The gods are fallen and all safety gone. ”
  2. #24
    “To see a wretched criminal squirming in the dock, suffering the tortures of the damned… was to me an exquisite pleasure. Mind you, I took no pleasure in seeing an innocent man there.”
  3. #25
    “Suddenly those stares made sense. My intentions didn’t matter. They didn’t know I didn’t want this. In their eyes, I was a threat. And I could see they wanted me gone.”
  4. #26
    “To tell you the truth, boss, I don’t know much of anything.”
  5. #27
    “I don’t want to repeat my innocence. I want the pleasure of losing it again.”
  6. #28
    “You are innocent until you understand.”
  7. #29
    “I am convinced that most people do not grow up. We find parking spaces and honor our credit cards. We marry and dare to have children and call that growing up. I think what we do is mostly grow old. We carry accumulation of years in our bodies, and on our faces, but generally our real selves, the children inside, are innocent and shy as magnolias.”
  8. #30
    “He wore his innocence like a comfortable old coat.”
  9. #31
    “STEVE
    I thought you you’re supposed to be innocent until you’re proven guilty?
    O’BRIEN
    That’s true, but in reality it depends on how the jury sees the case.”
  10. #32
    “None of my ten friends, even today, ascribes moral evil to Hitler, although most of them think (after the fact) that he made fatal strategical mistakes which even they themselves might have made at the time. His worst mistake was his selection of advisers—a backhand tribute to the Leader’s virtues of trustfulness and loyalty, to his very innocence of the knowledge of evil, fully familiar to those who have heard partisans of F. D. R. or Ike explain how things went wrong.”
  11. #33
    “I fooled myself. I had to. Everybody has to. If the good had been twice as good and the bad only half as bad, I still ought to have seen it, all through as I did in the beginning, because I am, as you say, sensitive. But I didn’t want to see it, because I would have then had to think about the consequences of seeing it, what followed from seeing it, what I must do to be decent. I wanted my home and family, my job, my career, a place in the community.”
  1. #34
    “Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”
  2. #35
    “There’s a lot of ugly things in this world, son. I wish I could keep ‘em all away from you. That’s never possible.”
  3. #36
    “So it took an eight-year-old child to bring ‘em to their senses...That proves something - that a gang of wild animals can be stopped, simply because they’re still human. Hmp, maybe we need a police force of children.”
  4. #37
    “Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man’s heart, and the fall through the air of a true, wise friend called Piggy.”
  5. #38
    “The other nine, decent, hard-working, ordinarily intelligent and honest men, did not know before 1933 that Nazism was evil. They did not know between 1933 and 1945 that it was evil. And they do not know it now. None of them ever knew, or now knows, Nazism as we knew and know it; and they lived under it, served it, and, indeed, made it.”
  6. #39
    “The fact is, I think, that my friends really didn’t know. They didn’t know because they didn’t want to know; but they didn’t know. They could have found out, at the time, only if they had wanted to very badly.”
  7. #40
    “It is, I suppose, the common grief of children at having to protect their parents from reality. It is bitter for the young to see what awful innocence adults grow into, that terrible vulnerability that must be sheltered from the rodent mire of childhood.”
  8. #41
    “I get glimpses of the horror of normalcy. Each of these innocents on the street is engulfed by a terror of their own ordinariness. They would do anything to be unique.”
  9. #42
    “There is likewise another great advantage in my scheme, that it will prevent those abortions, and that horrid practice of women murdering their bastard children, alas, too frequent among us, sacrificing the poor innocent babes, I doubt, more to avoid the expense than the shame.”
  10. #43
    “She had immense eyes that always seemed in danger of capsizing in their own innocence.”
  11. #44
    “Of what is great one must either be silent or speak with greatness. With greatness--that means cynically and with innocence.”

Books about mistakes

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The Mixed-Up Truck book
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5.8
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Madeline Finn and the Library Dog book
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5.5
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The Book of Mistakes book
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5.5
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Uh-oh, David! Sticker Book book
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A Whale of a Mistake book
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4.3
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Oopsie-do! book
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4.0
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Boy, Were We Wrong about the Weather! book
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It's Okay to Make Mistakes book
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