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Thomas Hardy Quotes

40 of the best book quotes from Thomas Hardy
  1. #1
    “Well, what I mean is that I shouldn’t mind being a bride at a wedding if I could be one without having a husband. But since a woman can’t show off in that way by herself I shan’t marry—at least yet.”
  2. #2
    “I shall be up before you are awake; I shall be afield before you are up; and I shall have breakfasted before you are afield. In short, I shall astonish you all.”
  3. #3
    “Your dear love, Bathsheba, is such a vast thing beside your pity that the loss of your pity as well as your love is no great addition to my sorrow, nor does the grain of your pity make it sensibly less.”
  4. #4
    “How sweet to be able to disdain, when most of us are glad to say, ‘Thank you!’ I seem to hear it. ‘No sir- I’m your better.‘”
  5. #5
    “I hate to be thought men’s property in that way—though possibly I shall be had some day.”
  6. #6
    “Thank God I am not married: what would she have done in the poverty now coming upon me!”
  7. #7
    “The first is that the bailiff is dismissed for thieving, and that I have formed a resolution to have no bailiff at all, but to manage everything with my own head and hands.”
  8. #8
    “This fevered hope had grown up again like a grain of mustard-seed during the quiet which followed the hasty conjecture that Troy was drowned.”
  9. #9
    “It appears that ordinary men take wives because possession is not possible without marriage, and that ordinary women accept husbands because marriage is not possible without possession.”
  10. #10
    “I’ve danced at your skittish heels, my beautiful Bathsheba, for many a long mile, and many a long day; and it is hard to begrudge me this one visit.”
  1. #11
    “I shall never forgive God for making me a woman, and dearly am I beginning to pay for the honour of owning a pretty face.”
  2. #12
    “Bathsheba loved Troy in the way that only self-reliant women love when they abandon their self-reliance.”
  3. #13
    “His being higher in learning and birth than the ruck o’ soldiers is anything but a proof of his worth. It shows his course to be down’ard.”
  4. #14
    “He wasn’t quite good enough for me.”
  5. #15
    “The sheep were not insured. –All the savings of a frugal life had been dispersed at a blow: his hopes of being an independent farmer were laid low—possibly for ever.”
  6. #16
    “Men are such constant fools! The rest may try to get over their passion with more or less success.”
  7. #17
    “I don’t love you and I much fear that I never shall love you as much as a woman ought to love a husband.”
  8. #18
    “Such women as you a hundred men always covet—your eyes will bewitch scores on scores into an unavailing fancy for you—you can only marry one of that many.”
  9. #19
    “In those earlier days she had always nourished a secret contempt for girls who were the slaves of the first good-looking young fellow who should choose to salute them.
  10. #20
    “Bathsheba burst into great sobs... but she determined to repress all evidences of feeling. She was conquered; but she would never own it as long as she lived.”

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  1. #21
    “There still faintly beamed from the woman’s features something of the freshness, and even the prettiness, of her youth; rendering it evident that the personal charms which Tess could boast were in main part her mother’s gift, and therefore unknightly, unhistorical.”
  2. #22
    ″‘Pooh – I have as much of mother as father in me!’ she said. ‘All my prettiness comes from her, and she was only a dairymaid.‘”
  3. #23
    “Pedigree, ancestral skeletons, monumental record, the D’Urberville lineaments, did not help Tess in her life’s battle as yet, even to the extent of attracting to her a dancing-partner over the heads of the commonest peasantry.”
  4. #24
    “She philosophically noted dates as they came past in the revolution of the year; the disastrous night of her life at Trantridge with its dark background of The Chase; also the dates of the baby’s birth and death; also her own birthday; and every other day individualized by incidents in which she had taken some share.”
  5. #25
    “Never in her life – she could swear it from the bottom of her soul – had she ever intended to do wrong; yet these hard judgments had come. Whatever her sins, they were not sins of intention, but of inadvertence, and why should she have been punished so persistently?”
  6. #26
    “O, you have torn my life all to pieces . . . made me be what I prayed you in pity not to make me be again!”
  7. #27
    “My life looks as if it had been wasted for want of chances! When I see what you know, what you have read, and seen, and thought, I feel what a nothing I am!”
  8. #28
    “Had she been ensconced here under other and more pleasant conditions she would have become alarmed; but, outside humanity, she had at present no fear.”
  9. #29
    “O why have you treated me so monstrously, Angel! I do not deserve it. I have thought it all over carefully, and I can never, never forgive you!”
  10. #30
    “She could not have borne their pity, and their whispered remarks to one another upon her strange situation; though she would almost have faced a knowledge of her circumstances by every individual there, so long as her story had remained isolated in the mind of each. It was the interchange of ideas about her that made her sensitiveness wince.”
  1. #31
    ″... but comfortable as her life had been there she could not go back. The anti-climax would be too intolerable; and her return might bring reproach upon her idolized husband.”
  2. #32
    “Thus, neither having the clue to the other’s secret, they were respectively puzzled at what each revealed, and awaited new knowledge of each other’s character and moods without attempting to pry into each other’s history.”
  3. #33
    “She hardly observed that a tear descended slowly upon his cheek, a tear so large that it magnified the pores of skin over which it rolled, like the object lens of a microscope.”
  4. #34
    “Every day, every hour, brought to him one more little stroke of her nature, and to her one more of his. Tess was trying to lead a repressed life, but she little divined the strength of her own vitality.”
  5. #35
    “These were the first words of antagonism. To fling elaborate sarcasms at Tess, however, was much life flinging them at a dog or cat. The charms of their subtlety passed by her unappreciated...”
  6. #36
    “There lay the pity of it. An immeasurable social chasm was to divide our heroine’s personality thereafter from that previous self of hers who stepped from her mother’s door to try her fortune at Trantridge poultry-farm.”
  7. #37
    “He was surprised to find this young woman – who though but a milkmaid had just that touch of rarity about her which might make her the envied of her housemates – shaping such sad imaginings.”
  8. #38
    “You are very good. But it strikes me that there is a want of harmony between your present mood of self-sacrifice and your past mood of self-preservation.”
  9. #39
    ″... nobody could love ‘ee more than Tess did! . . . She would have laid down her life for ‘ee. I could do no more.”
  10. #40
    “Do you regret that poor little act of justice to an absent one? O, Izz, don’t spoil it by regret!”
Book Topics › Feminism
Children's Books About Feminism

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