concept

education Quotes

100+ of the best book quotes about education
  1. #1
    “Education must be a lifelong pursuit. The person who doesn’t read is not better off than the person who can’t.”
  2. #2
    “Television is the command center of the new epistemology. There is no audience so young that it is barred from television. There is no poverty so abject that it must forgo television. There is no education so exalted that it is not modified by television.”
  3. #3
    “It was school that kept me going in those dark days. When I was in the street it felt as though every man I passed might be a Talib. We hid our school bags in our shawls. My father always said that the most beautiful thing in a village in the morning is the sight of a child in a school uniform, but now we were afraid to wear them.”
  4. #4
    “There is no subject of public interest—politics, news, education, religion, science, sports—that does not find its way to television. Which means that all public understanding of these subjects is shaped by the biases of television.”
  5. #5
    “School wasn’t the only thing my aunts missed out on. In the morning when my father was given a bowl of cream with his tea, his sisters were given only tea. If there were eggs, they would only be for the boys. When a chicken was slaughtered for dinner, the girls would get the wings and the neck while the luscious breast meat was enjoyed by my father, his brother, and my grandfather. ‘From early on I could feel I was different from my sisters,’ my father says.”
  6. #6
    “As we crossed the Malakand Pass I saw a young girl selling oranges. She was scratching marks on a piece of paper with a pencil to account for the oranges she had sold, as she could not read or write. I took a photo of her and vowed I would do everything in my power to help educate girls just like her. This was the war I was going to fight.”
  7. #7
    “Education is neither Eastern nor Western, it is human.”
  8. #8
    “Peace in every home, every street, every village, every country – this is my dream. Education for every boy and every girl in the world. To sit down on a chair and read my books with all my friends at school is my right. To see each and every human being with a smile of happiness is my wish.”
  9. #9
    “My father wanted us to be inspired by our great hero, but in a manner fit for our times - with pens, not swords. Just as Khattak had wanted the Pashtuns to unite against a foreign enemy, so we needed to unite against ignorance.”
  10. #10
    “My parents never once suggested I should withdraw from school, ever. Though we loved school, we hadn’t realized how important education was until the Taliban tried to stop us. Going to school, reading and doing our homework wasn’t just a way of passing time, it was our future.”
  11. #11
    “Education had been a great gift for him. He believed that lack of education was the root of all the Pakistan’s problems. Ignorance allowed politicians to fool people and bad administrators to be reelected. He believed schooling should be available for all, rich and poor, boys and girls.”
  12. #12
    ″‘Let us pick up our books and our pens,’ I said. ‘They are our most powerful weapons. One child, one teacher, one book and one pen can change the world.‘”
  13. #13
    “The Taliban could take our pens and books, but they could not stop our minds from thinking.”
  1. #14
    “The final stage is come when Man by eugenics, by pre-natal conditioning, and by an education and propaganda based on a perfect applied psychology, has obtained full control over himself.”
  2. #15
    “You taught me language, and my profit on ’t
    Is I know how to curse. The red plague rid you
    For learning me your language! ”
  3. #16
    “Educate, then, at any rate; for the age of implicit self-sacrifice and instinctive virtues is already flitting far away from us, and the time is fast approaching when freedom, public peace, and social order itself will not be able to exist without education.”
  4. #17
    “A society has no chance of success if its women are uneducated, Laila. No chance.”
  5. #18
    “Marriage can wait, education cannot.”
  6. #19
    “Education never ends, Watson. It is a series of lessons, with the greatest for the last.”
  7. #20
    “There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil—a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome.”
  8. #21
    “We modern, urban, educated folks yell at traffic and umpires and bills and banks and machines- especially machines. Machines and relatives get most of the yelling.”
  9. #22
    “And your education! Is not that also social, and determined by the social conditions under which you educate, by the intervention, direct or indirect, of society, by means of schools, etc.? The Communists have not invented the intervention of society in education; they do but seek to alter the character of that intervention, and to rescue education from the influence of the ruling class.”
  10. #23
    “Educated men are so impressive!”
  11. #24
    “But . . . you born with two strikes on you before you come to the plate. You got to guard it closely . . . always looking for the curve-ball on the inside corner. You can’t afford to let none get past you. You can’t afford a call strike. If you going down . . . you going down swinging.”
  12. #25
    “You don’t have to teach me to write,” said Zero. “Just to read. I don’t have anybody to write to.”
    “Sorry,” Stanley said again.
    His muscles and hands weren’t the only parts of his body that had toughened over the past several weeks. His heart had hardened as well.
  13. #26
    “Education is experience, and the essence of experience is self-reliance.”

Books about politics

View All
Abe's Honest Words book
Picture book
7.0
Add to list
Grace Goes to Washington book
Picture book
5.5
Add to list
Champions of Change book
Picture book
Add to list
Shirley Chisholm Is a Verb book
Picture book
Add to list
Corazon Aquino book
Picture book
Add to list
Who Is Ruth Bader Ginsburg? book
Board book
5.0
Add to list
Elizabeth Warren's Big, Bold Plans book
Picture book
4.9
Add to list
  1. #27
    “You think education is something to be done when all else fails?”
  2. #28
    ″‘The best thing for being sad,’ replied Merlyn, beginning to puff and blow, ‘is to learn something. That is the only thing that never fails.‘”
  3. #29
    “We are always falling in love or quarreling, looking for jobs or fearing to lose them, getting ill and recovering, following public affairs. If we let ourselves, we shall always be waiting for some distraction or other to end before we can really get down to our work.′
  4. #30
    “What did it mean that number 2 pencils, conjugations without context, Pythagorean theorems, handshakes, and head nods were the difference between life and death, were the curtains drawing down between the world and me? I could not retreat, as did so many, into the church and its mysteries. My parents rejected all dogmas. We spurned the holidays marketed by the people who wanted to be white. We would not stand for their anthems. We would not kneel before their God.”
  5. #31
    “His being higher in learning and birth than the ruck o’ soldiers is anything but a proof of his worth. It shows his course to be down’ard.”
  6. #32
    “If you do not find a remedy to these evils it is a vain thing to boast of your severity in punishing theft, which, though it may have the appearance of justice, yet in itself is neither just nor convenient; for if you suffer your people to be ill-educated, and their manners to be corrupted from their infancy, and then punish them for those crimes to which their first education disposed them, what else is to be concluded from this but that you first make thieves and then punish them?”
  7. #33
    “Since no one can read, every candidate is designated by a symbol. Wisely these men choose to represent themselves with useful things - knife, bottle, matches, cooking pot.”
  8. #34
    [I have learned] “Not to be offended with other men’s liberty of speech, and to apply myself unto philosophy.”
  9. #35
    “The magistrates never engage the people in unnecessary labour, since the chief end of the constitution is to regulate labour by the necessities of the public, and to allow the people as much time as is necessary for the improvement of their minds, in which they think the happiness of life consists.”
  10. #36
    [I have learned] “Moreover, to endure labour; nor to need many things; when I have anything to do, to do it myself rather than by others; not to meddle with many businesses; and not easily to admit of any slander.”
  11. #37
    “Give thyself leisure to learn some good thing, and cease roving and wandering to and fro.”
  12. #38
    “Neither the uneducated and uninformed of the truth, nor yet those who never make an end of their education, will be able ministers of State; not the former, because they have no single aim of duty which is the rule of all their actions, private as well as public; nor the latter, because they will not act at all except upon compulsion, fancying that they are already dwelling apart in the islands of the blest.”
  13. #39
    “The basis of education comes from the family!”
  1. #40
    “If I am right, certain professors of education must be wrong when they say that they can put a knowledge into the soul which was not there before, like sight into blind eyes.”
  2. #41
    “That educated didn’t mean smart. He had a point. Nothing in my education or knowledge of the future had helped me to escape. Yet in a few years an illiterate runaway named Harriet Tubman would make nineteen trips into this country and lead three hundred fugitives to freedom.”
  3. #42
    “A person can be highly educated, professionally successful, and financially literate.”
  4. #43
    “You make it sound as if Bert is a hero. I’d like to think that, but I can’t. A schoolteacher is a public servant: I think he should do what the law and the school-board want him to. If the superintendent says, ‘Miss Brown, you’re to teach from Whitley’s Second Reader,’ I don’t feel I have to give him an argument.”
  5. #44
    “I am concerned that too many people are focused too much on money and not on their greatest wealth, which is their education.”
  6. #45
    “There are obviously two educations. One should teach us how to make a living and the other how to live. Surely these should never be confused in the mind of any man who has the slightest inkling of what culture is.”
  7. #46
    “There are three things which every artificer must possess if he is to effect anything,—nature, education, practice. Nature is to be judged by capacity, education by knowledge, practice by its fruit.”
  8. #47
    “‘I think perhaps education doesn’t do us much good unless it is mixed with sweat.’”
  9. #48
    “Everything can be explained to the people, on the single condition that you want them to understand.”
  10. #49
    “And to all our little first grade friends only today starting on the road to knowledge and education, may your tiny feet find the pathways of learning steady and forever before you.”
  11. #50
    “I always wanted to be a real singer, the kind that comes out on the stage all dressed up. But I didn’t have no education and I didn’t know the first way about how to start in being a stage singer.”
  12. #51
    “Some of the American whites, moreover, are just as far behind in this respect as are the Negroes who have had less opportunity to learn better.”
  13. #52
    “The mere imparting of information is not education. ”

Books about books

View All
Duncan the Story Dragon book
Picture book
5.8
Add to list
The Wall in the Middle of the Book book
Picture book
5.8
Add to list
The Children Who Loved Books book
Picture book
5.8
Add to list
My Pet Book book
Picture book
5.8
Add to list
The Detective Dog book
Picture book
5.7
Add to list
How This Book Was Made book
Picture book
5.6
Add to list
The Dump Man's Treasures book
Picture book
5.6
Add to list
  1. #53
    “Real education means to inspire people to live more abundantly, to learn to begin with life as they find it and make it better,”
  2. #54
    “Philosophers have long conceded, however, that every man has two educators: ‘that which is given to him, and the other that which he gives himself. Of the two kinds the latter is by far the more desirable. Indeed all that is most worthy in man he must work out and conquer for himself. It is that which constitutes our real and best nourishment. What we are merely taught seldom nourishes the mind like that which we teach ourselves.”
  3. #55
    “The purpose of the salon was partly to entertain and partly to educate the guests. By sharing ideas and debating philosophical points, artists found new inspiration for their work.”
  4. #56
    “I stayed in school. I was not the smartest or even particularly outstanding but I was there and staying out of trouble and I intended to finish.”
  5. #57
    “If I am occasionally a little over-dressed, I make up for it by being always immensely over-educated.”
  6. #58
    “It takes careful observation, and education, and reflection, and communication with others, just to scratch the surface of your beliefs.”
  7. #59
    “There is little point in teaching anything backwards. The whole object of life, Headmistress, is to go forwards.”
  8. #60
    “Books! What have such as I, who am a warrior of the wilderness, though a man without a cross, to do with books? I never read but in one, and the words that are written there are too simple and too plain to need much schooling...”
  9. #61
    “To everyone else, school was prison. To Lena, it was freedom.”
  10. #62
    “Rejection is an opportunity for your selection.”
  11. #63
    They agreed that it was neither possible nor necessary to educate people who never questioned anything.
  12. #64
    “I possess the most valuable experience, the experience of the race, for in spite of going to college I’ve managed to pick up a good education.”
  13. #65
    “A big part of the tutor’s job was to steer the players away from the professors and courses most likely to lead to lack of performance. The majority of the football team wound up majoring in ‘Criminal Justice.’ What Criminal Justice had going for it was that it didn’t require any math or language skills. Criminal Justice classes were also almost always filled with other football players.”
  1. #66
    “Exactly what I’m trying to do here with you now: to make you responsible young men and young ladies. But you, you prefer to play with bugs. You refuse to study your arithmetic, and you prefer writing slanted sentences instead of straight ones. Does that make any sense?”
  2. #67
    “There’s no such thing as neutral education. Education either functions as an instrument to bring about conformity or freedom.”
  3. #68
    “Banking education treats students as objects of assistance; problem posing education makes them critical thinkers.”
  4. #69
    “And since people ‘receive’ the world as passive entities, education should make them more passive still, and adapt them to the world. The educated individual is the adapted person, because he or she is better ‘fit’ for the world”
  5. #70
    “Education must begin with the solution of the teacher-student contradiction, by reconciling the poles of the contradiction so that both are simultaneously teachers and students.”
  6. #71
    “Many of these leaders, however (perhaps due to the natural and understandable biases against pedagogy) have ended up using the ‘educational’ methods employed by the oppressor. They deny pedagogical action in the liberation process, but they use propaganda to convince.”
  7. #72
    “Liberating education consists in acts of cognition, and transferals of information.”
  8. #73
    “There is a time in every man’s education when he arrives at the conviction that envy is ignorance; that imitation is suicide; that he must take himself for better, for worse, as his portion; that though the wide universe is full of good, no kernel of nourishing corn can come to him but through his toil bestowed on that plot of ground which is given to him to till.”
  9. #74
    “I think we’ve outgrown full-time education ... Time to test our talents in the real world, d’you reckon?”
  10. #75
    “Prejudices, it is well known, are most difficult to eradicate from the heart whose soil has never been loosened or fertilised by education: they grow there, firm as weeds among stones.”
  11. #76
    “O teach me how I should forget to think.”
  12. #77
    “Even trained for years as they all had been in precision of language, what words could you use which would give another the experience of sunshine?”
  13. #78
    As I ate she began the first of what we later called “my lessons in living.” She said that I must always be intolerant of ignorance but understanding of illiteracy. That some people, unable to go to school, were more educated and even more intelligent than college professors. She encouraged me to listen carefully to what country people called mother wit. That in those homely sayings was couched the collective wisdom of generations.
  1. #79
    “No comma, no period, no adjective or adverb was beneath his interest. He made no distinction between grammar and content, between form and substance. A poorly written sentence was a poorly conceived idea, and in his view the grammatical logic was as much in need of correction. “Tell me,” he would say, “why have you placed this comma here? What relationship between these phrases are you hoping to establish?”
  2. #80
    The quality of strength lined with tenderness is an unbeatable combination, as are intelligence and necessity when unblunted by formal education.
  3. #81
    He was a simple man who had no inferiority complex about his lack of education, and even more amazing no superiority complex because he had succeeded despite that lack.
  4. #82
    “When I am king they shall not have bread and shelter only, but also teachings out of books, for a full belly is little worth where the mind is starved.”
  5. #83
    “Now I understand that one of the important reasons for going to college and getting an education is to learn that the things you’ve believed in all your life aren’t true, and that nothing is what it appears to be.”
  6. #84
    I always thought education was learning to think for yourself.
  7. #85
    “If you had a heart attack this minute and had to call a doctor, that doctor would be a university graduate. If you got sued for selling someone a rotten second-hand car, you’d have to get a lawyer and he’d be a university graduate, too. Do not despise clever people, Mr. Wormwood.”
  8. #86
    I’ve successfully lobbied and testified for stalking laws in several states, but I would trade them all for a high school class that would teach young men how to hear “no,” and teach young women that it’s all right to explicitly reject.
  9. #87
    We must learn and then teach our children that niceness does not equal goodness.
  10. #88
    “Being twenty-nine, she was by Chinese standards well into old-maid territory, and even though her busybody relatives were perpetually trying to set her up, she had spent the better part of her twenties focused on getting through grad school, finishing her dissertation, and jump-starting her career in academia.”
  11. #89
    “How is this to be avoided, among ordinary men, even highly educated ordinary men? Frankly, I do not know. I do not see, even now. Many, many times since it all happened I have pondered that pair of great maxims, *Principiis obsta* and *Finem respice*—‘Resist the beginnings’ and ‘Consider the end.’ But one must foresee the end in order to resist, or even see, the beginnings. One must foresee the end clearly and certainly and how is this to be done, by ordinary men or even by extraordinary men?”
  12. #90
    “Getting an education was a bit like a communicable sexual disease. It made you unsuitable for a lot of jobs and then you had the urge to pass it on.”
  13. #91
    “College costs money--a lot. Yet education in itself is not of much value. For example, we can look to the general public’s almost complete disregard for anything that educated people have to say about global warming, shrinking oil reserves, pollution, or the threat of nuclear annihilation. But if this is true, why does something as worthless as a college diploma cost so much money?”
  1. #92
    “Right,” said Dr. Brodsky. “It’s association, the oldest educational method in the world. And what really causes you to feel ill.”
  2. #93
    “The same love of pleasure, fostered by the whole tendency of their education, gives a trifling turn to the conduct of women in most circumstances.”
  3. #94
    “The management of the temper, the first, and most important branch of education, requires the sober steady eye of reason.”
  4. #95
    “Would ye, O my sisters, really possess modesty . . . ye must acquire that soberness of mind, which the exercise of duties, and the pursuit of knowledge, alone inspire, or ye will remain in a doubtful dependent situation, and only be loved whilst ye are fair!”
  5. #96
    “Let woman share the rights and she will emulate the virtues of man.”
  6. #97
    “Besides, how should a woman void of reflection be capable of educating her children?”
  7. #98
    “The fact is, that men expect from education, what education cannot give.”
  8. #99
    “If then a practical end must be assigned to a University course, I say it is that of training good members of society... It is the education which gives a man a clear, conscious view of their own opinions and judgements, a truth in developing them, an eloquence in expressing them, and a force in urging them.”
  9. #100
    “It is the education which gives a man a clear conscious view of his own opinions and judgments, a truth in developing them, an eloquence in expressing them and a force in urging them.”
  10. #101
    “In the pearl he saw Coyotito sitting at a little desk in a school, just as Kino had once seen it through an open door. And Coyotito was dressed in a jacket, and he had on a white collar and a broad silken tie
  11. #102
    “My son will read and open the books, and my son will write and will know writing. And my son will make numbers, and these things will make us free because he will know—he will know and through him we will know.”
  12. #103
    “It’s a universal law– intolerance is the first sign of an inadequate education. An ill-educated person behaves with arrogant impatience, whereas truly profound education breeds humility.”
  13. #104
    “Love as education is one of the great powers of the world, but it hangs in a delicate suspension; it achieves its harmony as seldom as does love by the senses. Frustrated, it creates even greater havoc, for like all love it is a madness.”
  14. #105
    “When you find a writer who really is saying something to you, read everything that writer has written and you will get more education and depth of understanding out of that than reading a scrap here and a scrap there and elsewhere. Then go to people who influenced that writer, or those who were related to him, and your world builds together in an organic way that is really marvelous.”
Book Topics › culture
Children's Books About Culture
Book Topics › learning
Children's Books About Learning
Book Topics › women's rights
Children's Books About Women's Rights
Join Our Kids Book Club
Learn More