concept

Marriage Quotes

32 of the best book quotes about marriage
  1. #1
    “His ideas of marriage were, consequently, quite unlike those of the great majority of his acquaintances, for whom getting married was one of the numerous facts of social life. For Levin it was the chief affair of life, on which its whole happiness turned.”
  2. #2
    “When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.”
  3. #3
    “Say, Becky, was you ever engaged?”
    “What’s that?”
    “Why, engaged to be married.”
    “No.”
    “Would you like to?”
    “I reckon so. I don’t know. What is it like?”
    “Like? Why it ain’t like anything. You only just tell a boy you won’t ever have anybody but him, ever ever ever, and then you kiss and that’s all. Anybody can do it.”
  4. #4
    “I know what it is to live entirely for and with what I love best on earth. I hold myself supremely blest -- blest beyond what language can express; because I am my husband’s life as fully as he is mine.”
  5. #5
    “The French fashion — of the parents arranging their children’s future — was not accepted; it was condemned. The English fashion of the complete independence of girls was also not accepted, and not possible in Russian society. The Russian fashion of matchmaking by the officer of intermediate persons was for some reason considered disgraceful; it was ridiculed by everyone, and by the princess herself. But how girls were to be married, and how parents were to marry them, no one knew.”
  6. #6
    “As for my husband, she said, he’s just that. My husband. I want that to be perfectly clear. Till death do us part. It’s final.”
  7. #7
    “I love Sibyl Vane. I want to place her on a pedestal of gold and to see the world worship the woman who is mine. What is marriage? An irrevocable vow. You mock at it for that. Ah! don’t mock. It is an irrevocable vow that I want to take. Her trust makes me faithful, her belief makes me good. When I am with her, I regret all that you have taught me. I become different from what you have known me to be. I am changed, and the mere touch of Sibyl Vane’s hand makes me forget you and all your wrong, fascinating, poisonous, delightful theories.”
  8. #8
    “Why do we teach girls to aspire to marriage, yet we don’t teach boys to do the same?”
  1. #9
    When any two young people take it into their heads to marry, they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary to each other’s ultimate comfort.
  2. #10
    A woman is not to marry a man merely because she is asked, or because he is attached to her, and can write a tolerable letter.
    author
    Jane Austen
    book
    Emma
    concept
    Marriage
  3. #11
    “Do anything rather than marry without affection.”
  4. #12
    “It does good to no woman to be flattered [by a man] who does not intend to marry her; and it is madness in all women to let a secret love kindle within them, which, if unreturned and unknown, must devour the life that feeds it; and, if discovered and responded to, must lead, ignis-fatuus-like, into miry wilds whence there is no extrication.”
  5. #13
    “If she do bid me pack, I’ll give her thanks
    As though she bid me stay by her a week.
    If she deny to wed, I’ll crave the day
    When I shall ask the banns, and when be married.”
  6. #14
    “I hope to see you one day fitted with a husband.”
  7. #15
    “How can I live without thee, how forgoe
    Thy sweet Converse and Love so dearly joyn’d?”
  8. #16
    The more he talked the more he remembered, and then he thought to himself, “Those were happy days, but they may come again. Humpty Dumpty fell down stairs, and yet he married the princess; perhaps I may marry a princess too.” And the fir-tree thought of the pretty little birch-tree that grew in the forest, which was to him a real beautiful princess.
  1. #17
    “I think it ought not to be set down as certain that a man must be acceptable to every woman he may happen to like himself.”
  2. #18
    “I suppose that we women are such cowards that we think a man will save us from fears, and we marry him.”
  3. #19
    If I was wrong in yielding to persuasion once, remember that it was to persuasion exerted on the side of safety, not of risk. When I yielded, I thought it was to duty; but no duty could be called in aid here. In marrying a man indifferent to me, all risk would have been incurred and all duty violated.
  4. #20
    I lay it down as a general rule, Harriet, that if a woman doubts as to whether she should accept a man or not, she certainly ought to refuse him.
    author
    Jane Austen
    book
    Emma
    character
    Emma Woodhouse
    concept
    Marriage
  5. #21
    Men of sense, whatever you may choose to say, do not want silly wives.
    author
    Jane Austen
    book
    Emma
    character
    Mr. Knightley
    concept
    Marriage
  6. #22
    “Our society teaches a woman at a certain age who is unmarried to see it as a deep personal failure. While a man at a certain age who is unmarried has not quite come around to making his pick. It is easy to say, ‘But women can just say no to all this.’ But the reality is more difficult, more complex. We are all social beings. We internalize ideas from our socialization.”
  7. #23
    “I think, sweetest child, that we should strike a bargain, you and I: if Westley wants to marry you still, bless you both. If, for reasons unpleasant to mention, his pride will not let him, then you will marry me, as planned, and be the Queen of Florin.”
  8. #24
    “Her tone was surprisingly tender, and probably she sensed how important he really was to her, because when he did die, two years further on, she went right after, and most of the people who knew her well agreed it was the sudden lack of opposition that undid her.”
  1. #25
    “My mom used to tell me that whatever you do, marry someone who loves you more than you love him.”
  2. #26
    “From the very beginning—from the first moment, I may almost say—of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish distain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of the disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world on whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.”
  3. #27
    “When looking for a life partner, my advice to women is date all of them: the bad boys, the cool boys, the commitment-phobic boys, the crazy boys. But do not marry them. The things that make the bad boys sexy do not make them good husbands. When it comes time to settle down, find someone who wants an equal partner. Someone who thinks women should be smart, opinionated and ambitious. Someone who values fairness and expects or, even better, wants to do his share in the home. These men exist and, trust me, over time, nothing is sexier.”
  4. #28
    “When woman work outside the home and share breadwinning duties, couples are more likely to stay together. In fact, the risk of divorce reduces by about half when a wife earns half the income and a husband does half the housework.”
  5. #29
    “A lady’s imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.”
  6. #30
    A wife should be always a reasonable and agreeable companion, because she cannot always be young.
  7. #31
    “It was true; always had been. Friendships were like marriages in that way. Routines and patterns were poured early and hardened like cement.”
  8. #32
    “What if they were allowed to choose their own mate? And chose wrong?”
    author
    Lois Lowry
    book
    The Giver
    character
    Jonas
    concepts
    MarriageChoices
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