concept

knowledge Quotes

100+ of the best book quotes about knowledge
  1. #1
    “Most times, it’s just a lot easier not to let the world know what’s wrong.”
  2. #2
    “It’s especially hard to admit that you made a mistake to your parents, because, of course, you know so much more than they do.”
  3. #3
    “Our knowledge of life is limited to death.”
  4. #4
    “What shall we do if we take ignorance to be knowledge?”
  5. #5
    “Pay close attention to everything, notice what no one else notices. Then you’ll know what no one else knows, and that’s always useful.”
  6. #6
    “They enter into blind darkness who worship Avidya (ignorance and delusion); they fall, as it were, into greater darkness who worship Vidya (knowledge).”
  7. #7
    “There is this doubt regarding what becomes of a man after death. Some say he exists, others that he does not exist. This knowledge I desire, being instructed by thee.”
  8. #8
    “He who has not turned away from evil conduct, whose senses are uncontrolled, who is not tranquil, whose mind is not at rest, he can never attain this Atman even by knowledge.”
  9. #9
    “In my immature brain, I didn’t understand the difference between intelligence and knowledge. So I assumed I was an idiot.”
  10. #10
    “In America religion is the road to knowledge, and the observance of the divine laws leads man to civil freedom.”
  11. #11
    “Your challenge as a #GIRLBOSS is to dive headfirst into things without being too attached to the results. When your goal is to gain experience, perspective, and knowledge, failure is no longer a possibility. Failure is your invention. I believe that there is a silver lining in everything, and once you begin to see it, you’ll need sunglasses to combat the glare. It is she who listens to the rest of the world who fails, and it is she who has enough confidence to define success and failure for herself who succeeds.”
  12. #12
    “Right is right, and wrong is wrong, and a body ain’t got no business doing wrong when he ain’t ignorant and knows better.”
  13. #13
    “Until then, when I thought of writers, what first came to mind was Mom, hunched over her typewriter, clattering away on her novels and plays and philosophies of life and occasionally receiving a personalized rejection letter. But a newspaper reporter, instead of holing up in isolation, was in touch with the rest of the world. What the reporter wrote influenced what people thought about and talked about the next day; he knew what was really going on. I decided I wanted to be one of the people who knew what was really going on.”
  14. #14
    “I’m older than you, and must know better.”
  15. #15
    “This is the true division between Silvers and Reds: the color of our blood. This simple difference somehow makes them stronger, smarter, better than us.”
  16. #16
    “My father was very sure about certain matters pertaining to the universe. To him, all good things—trout as well as eternal salvation—come by grace and grace comes by art and art does not come easy.”
  17. #17
    “Let every sluice of knowledge be opened and set a-flowing.”
  18. #18
    “Intelligence takes chance with limited data in an arena where mistakes are not only possible but also necessary.”
  19. #19
    “One way or the other, I have a very valuable piece of information. And if they know I have it, they might do something to alter the force field so I can’t see the aberration anymore. So I lie.”
  20. #20
    “Envy is ignorance,
    Imitation is Suicide.”
  21. #21
    “Coach Graham worked in a no-coddling zone. Self-esteem? He knew there was really only one way to teach kids how to develop it: You give them something they can’t do, they work hard until they find they can do it, and you just keep repeating the process.’’
  22. #22
    “The dog was disappointed and yearned back toward the fire. This man did not know cold. Possibly all the generations of his ancestry had been ignorant of cold, of real cold, of cold one hundred and seven degrees below freezing point. But the dog knew; all its ancestry knew, and it had inherited the knowledge”
  23. #23
    “What we know matters but who we are matters more.”
  24. #24
    “The best books... are those that tell you what you know already.”
  25. #25
    “But if thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought.”
  26. #26
    “I am tired of knowing nothing and being reminded of it all the time.”
  27. #27
    “When you know a thing, to hold that you know it; and when you do not know a thing, to allow that you do not know it;— this is knowledge.”
  1. #28
    “Until they become conscious they will never rebel, and until after they have rebelled they cannot become conscious.”
  2. #29
    “If a man keeps cherishing his old knowledge, so as continually to be acquiring new, he may be a teacher of others.”
  3. #30
    “In general, the greater the understanding, the greater the delusion; the more intelligent, the less sane.”
  4. #31
    “So I left him, saying to myself, as I went away: Well, although I do not suppose that either of us knows anything really beautiful and good, I am better off than he is,—for he knows nothing, and thinks that he knows; I neither know nor think that I know.”
    author
    Plato
    book
    Apology
    character
    Socrates
    concepts
    beautyknowledgegood
  5. #32
    “A clever mind is not a heart. Knowledge doesn’t really care, wisdom does.”
  6. #33
    “Isn’t it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive--it’s such an interesting world. It wouldn’t be half so interesting if we know all about everything, would it? There’d be no scope for imagination then, would there? But am I talking too much? People are always telling me I do. Would you rather I didn’t talk? If you say so I’ll stop. I can stop when I make up my mind to it, although it’s difficult.”
  7. #34
    “My idea of good company...is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.′
    ‘You are mistaken,’ said he gently, ‘that is not good company, that is the best.”
  8. #35
    “Adams […] told me that he recognized these innocent-looking puffs of water vapor to be the crowns of robust thunderheads.”
  9. #36
    ″We will define a habit as the intersection of knowledge, skill, and desire. Knowledge is the theoretical paradigm, the what to do and the why. Skill is the how to do. And desire is the motivation, the want to do. In order to make something a habit in our lives, we have to have all three.″
  10. #37
    “A man may have knowledge like an angel and yet not be Christian. So your sign of knowledge as evidence is not valid. Indeed, to know is a thing that pleases talkers and boasters, but to do is what pleases God.”
  11. #38
    “I know my own sin. I know that I deserve my punishment. I do not begrudge it.”
  12. #39
    “Lord, we know what we are, but know not what we may be.”
  13. #40
    “The lion and the giraffe and the wombat and the rest do what they do and are what they are. And somehow manage to make it there in the cage, living the unexamined life. But to be human is to know and care and ask. To keep rattling the bars of the cage of existence hollering, ‘What’s it for?’ at the stones and stars, and making prisons and palaces out of the echoing answers. That’s what we do and that’s what we are. And that’s why a zoo is a nice place to visit but I wouldn’t want to live there.”
  14. #41
    “Learning is knowledge and knowledge is freedom and power. He knew that. He had forgotten that, somehow. But he knew it once more.”
  15. #42
    “I cannot describe to you the agony that these reflections inflicted upon me; I tried to dispel them, but sorrow only increased with knowledge.”
  16. #43
    “By degrees I made a discovery of still greater moment. I found that these people possessed a method of communicating their experience and feelings to one another by articulate sounds. I perceived that the words they spoke sometimes produced pleasure or pain, smiles or sadness, in the minds and countenances of the hearers. This was indeed a godlike science, and I ardently desired to become acquainted with it.”
  17. #44
    “Natural philosophy is the genius that has regulated my fate; I desire, therefore, in this narration, to state those facts which led to my predilection for that science.”
  18. #45
    “Father laughed, which upset Bruno even more; there was nothing that made him more angry than when a grown-up laughed at him for not knowing something, especially when he was trying to find out the answer by asking questions.”
  19. #46
    “For some reason, you will no longer be the person you believed you once were. You’ll detect slow and subtle shifts going on all around you, more importantly shifts in you. Worse, you’ll realize it’s always been shifting, like a shimmer of sorts, a vast shimmer, only dark like a room. But you won’t understand why or how. You’ll have forgotten what granted you this awareness in the first place
  20. #47
    “The senseless is the major factor in our lives.”
    author
    Ayn Rand
    book
    The Fountainhead
    character
    Toohey
    concept
    knowledge
  21. #48
    “One may know how to conquer without being able to do it.”
  22. #49
    “It was the greatest sensation of existence: not to trust, but to know.”
  23. #50
    “The way to deeper knowledge of God is through the lonely valleys of soul poverty and abnegation of all things.”
  24. #51
    “You attain to knowledge by argument;
    You attain a craft or skill by practice;”
  25. #52
    “When she was walking me to the door, the librarian stopped at her desk and said, ‘Now I know that knowledge is a food, but I couldn’t help noticing you never went to eat. You must be very hungry.’ She handed me a paper bag and gave me another smile. ”
  26. #53
    “The way of success is the way of continuous pursuit of knowledge.”
  27. #54
    “An educated man is not, necessarily, one who has an abundance of general or specialized knowledge. An educated man is one who has so developed the faculties of his mind that he may acquire anything he wants, or its equivalent, without violating the rights of others.”

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  1. #55
    “But we loved the Science of Things. We wished to know. We wished to know about all the things which make the earth around us. We asked so many questions that the Teachers forbade it.”
  2. #56
    “We sat still and we held our breath. For our face and our body were beautiful. Our face was not like the faces of our brothers, for we felt no pity when looking upon it. Our body was not like the bodies of our brothers, for our limbs were straight and thin and hard and strong. And we thought that we could trust this being who looked upon us from the stream, and that we had nothing to fear with this being.”
  3. #57
    “It is possible to fly without motors, but not without knowledge and skill.”
  4. #58
    “We are old now, yet we were young this morning, when we carried our glass box through the streets of the City to the Home of the Scholars.”
  5. #59
    “Know thyself deathless and able to know all things, all arts, sciences, the way of every life. Become higher than the highest height and lower than the lowest depth. Amass in thyself all senses of animals, fire, water, dryness and moistness. Think of thyself in all places at the same time, earth, sea, sky, not yet born, in the womb, young, old, dead, and in the after death state.”
  6. #60
    “It is my mind which thinks, and the judgment of my mind is the only searchlight that can find the truth.”
  7. #61
    “No single one can possess greater wisdom than the many Scholars who are elected by all men for their wisdom. Yet we can. We do.”
  8. #62
    “True knowledge comes from the upward path which leads to the eternal fire; error, defeat and death result from following the lower path of worldly attachment.”
  9. #63
    “There was no pain in their eyes and no knowledge of the agony of their body. There was only joy in them, and pride, a pride holier than it is fit for human pride to be.”
  10. #64
    “If you are mighty and powerful, then gain respect through knowledge and through your gentleness of speech. Don’t order things except as it is fitting. The one who provokes others gets into trouble. Don’t be haughty lest you be humbled. But also, don’t be mute lest you be chided.”
  11. #65
    “I wished to know the meaning of things. I am the meaning.”
  12. #66
    “We cannot change what we are not aware of, and once we are aware, we cannot help but change.”
  13. #67
    “But the upside of painful knowledge is so much greater than the downside of blissful ignorance.
  14. #68
    “I often make the mistake of thinking that something that is obvious to me is just as obvious to everyone else.”
  15. #69
    “I am the mate and companion of people, all just as immortal and fathomless as myself,
    (They do not know how immortal, but I know.)”
  16. #70
    New knowledge is the most valuable commodity on earth. The more truth we have to work with, the richer we become.
  17. #71
    [I have learned]“To read with diligence; not to rest satisfied with a light and superficial knowledge, nor quickly to assent to things commonly spoken of.”
  18. #72
    “Knowledge is happiness, because to have knowledge—broad, deep knowledge—is to know true ends from false, and lofty things from low.”
  19. #73
    Everything I know, I know because of love.
  20. #74
    “I wait full knowledge ere I judge.”
  21. #75
    “But, whether true or false, my opinion is that in the world of knowledge the idea of good appears last of all, and is seen only with an effort; and, when seen, is also inferred to be the universal author of all things beautiful and right, parent of light and of the lord of light in this visible world, and the immediate source of reason and truth in the intellectual; and that this is the power upon which he who would act rationally either in public or private life must have his eye fixed.”
  22. #76
    “He will require to grow accustomed to the sight of the upper world. And first he will see the shadows best, next the reflections of men and other objects in the water, and then the objects themselves; then he will gaze upon the light of the moon and the stars and the spangled heaven; and he will see the sky and the stars by night better than the sun or the light of the sun by day?”
  23. #77
    “Thou must hasten therefore; not only because thou art every day nearer unto death than other, but also because that intellective faculty in thee, whereby thou art enabled to know the true nature of things, and to order all thy actions by that knowledge, doth daily waste and decay: or, may fail thee before thou die.”
  24. #78
    “If I am right, certain professors of education must be wrong when they say that they can put a knowledge into the soul which was not there before, like sight into blind eyes.”
  25. #79
    “The prison-house is the world of sight, the light of the fire is the sun, and you will not misapprehend me if you interpret the journey upwards to be the ascent of the soul into the intellectual world according to my poor belief, which, at your desire, I have expressed—whether rightly or wrongly God knows.”
  26. #80
    “You have shown me a strange image, and they are strange prisoners.”
  27. #81
    “His priority did not seem to be to teach them what he knew, but rather to impress upon them that nothing, not even centaurs’ knowledge, was foolproof.”
  1. #82
    “No man knows till he experiences it, what it is like to feel his own life-blood drawn away into the woman he loves.”
  2. #83
    “Remember my friend, that knowledge is stronger than memory, and we should not trust the weaker.”
  3. #84
    “That educated didn’t mean smart. He had a point. Nothing in my education or knowledge of the future had helped me to escape. Yet in a few years an illiterate runaway named Harriet Tubman would make nineteen trips into this country and lead three hundred fugitives to freedom.”
  4. #85
    “The world will break your heart ten ways to Sunday, that’s guaranteed.
    And I can’t begin to explain that- or the craziness inside myself and everybody else, but guess what? Sunday is my fav day again”
  5. #86
    “As the child’s mind was growing into knowledge, his mind was growing into memory.”
  6. #87
    “The old Once-ler still lives here. Ask him. He knows.”
  7. #88
    “It is said that the Devil has all the best tunes.
    This is broadly true. But Heaven has the best choreographers.”
  8. #89
    “You never even hear any hints dropped on a campus that wisdom is supposed to be the goal of knowledge.”
  9. #90
    “...I realized that I knew less about loneliness than I had thought - and much less than I would know when he went away.”
  10. #91
    “Don’t be addicted to money. Work to learn, don’t work for money. Work for knowledge.”
  11. #92
    “For most of us it is essential that we should make a living...In the complications of modern life and with our increased accumulation of knowledge, it doubtless helps greatly to compress some years of experience into far fewer years by studying for a particular trade or profession in an institution; but that fact should not blind us to another—namely, that in so doing we are learning a trade or a profession, but are not getting a liberal education as human beings.”
  12. #93
    “You have never heard me talk much. But an intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend his time with fools.”
  13. #94
    “Too many scholars think of research as purely a cerebral pursuit. If we do nothing with the knowledge we gain, then we have wasted our study. Books can store information better than we can--what we we do that books cannot is interpret. So if one is not going to draw conclusions, then one might as well just leave the information in the texts.”
  14. #95
    “How little we know of what there is to know. I wish that I were going to live a long time instead of going to die today because I have learned much about life in these four days; more, I think than in all other time. I’d like to be an old man to really know. I wonder if you keep on learning or if there is only a certain amount each man can understand. I thought I knew so many things that I know nothing of. I wish there was more time.”
  15. #96
    “Our minds thus grow in spots; and like grease spots, the spots spread. But we let them spread as little as possible: we keep unaltered as much of our old knowledge, as many of our old prejudices and beliefs, as we can.”
  16. #97
    “How little we know of what there is to know.”
  17. #98
    “Care and responsibility are constituent elements of love, but without respect for and knowledge of the beloved person, love deteriorates into domination and possessiveness.”
  18. #99
    “Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.”
  19. #100
    “Imagination can’t create anything new, can it? It only recycles bits and pieces from the world and reassembles them into visions. So when we think we’ve escaped the unbearable ordinariness and, well, untruthfulness of our lives, it’s really only the same old ordinariness and falseness rearranged into the appearance of novelty and truth. Nothing unknown is knowable.”
  20. #101
    Let faith oust fact; let fancy oust memory; I look deep down and do believe.
  21. #102
    “Thus, neither having the clue to the other’s secret, they were respectively puzzled at what each revealed, and awaited new knowledge of each other’s character and moods without attempting to pry into each other’s history.”
  22. #103
    “There are three things which every artificer must possess if he is to effect anything,—nature, education, practice. Nature is to be judged by capacity, education by knowledge, practice by its fruit.”
  23. #104
    “The two desires struggle within me: the desire to be safe, and the desire to know. I cannot tell which one will win.”
  24. #105
    “We can’t choose our fate, but we can choose others. Be careful in knowing that.”
  25. #106
    “Trump didn’t read. He didn’t really even skim. If it was print, it might as well not exist. Some believed that for all practical purposes he was no more than semiliterate. (There was some argument about this, because he could read headlines and articles about himself, or at least headlines on articles about himself, and the gossip squibs on the New York Post’s Page Six.)”
  26. #107
    “How am I supposed to know what’s real and what’s not? It feels like I’m the only one who doesn’t know the difference.”
  27. #108
    “Faith is a knowledge within the heart, beyond the reach of proof.”

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  1. #109
    “No one can reveal to you nothing but that which already lies half-asleep in the dawning of your knowledge.”
  2. #110
    “Knowledge forbidd’n?
    Suspicious, reasonless. Why should thir Lord
    Envie them that? can it be sin to know,
    Can it be death?”
  3. #111
    “If you want to find Cherry-Tree Lane all you have to do is ask the Policeman at the cross-roads.”
  4. #112
    “You don’t have to know a lot of things for your life to make a lasting difference in the world. But you do have to know the few great things that matter, perhaps just one, and then be willing to live for them and die for them. The people that make a durable difference in the world are not the people who have mastered many things, but who have been mastered by one great thing.”
  5. #113
    “Love should be allowed. I’m all for it. Now that I’ve got a pretty good idea what it is.”
  6. #114
    “A mind fed daily on TV diminishes. Your mind was made to know and love God.”
  7. #115
    “The notion of the presidency as an institutional and political concept, with an emphasis on ritual and propriety and semiotic messaging—statesmanship—was quite beyond him.”
  8. #116
    “Philosophers have long conceded, however, that every man has two educators: ‘that which is given to him, and the other that which he gives himself. Of the two kinds the latter is by far the more desirable. Indeed all that is most worthy in man he must work out and conquer for himself. It is that which constitutes our real and best nourishment. What we are merely taught seldom nourishes the mind like that which we teach ourselves.”
  9. #117
    “In those days he really didn’t know what he was talking about; that is to say, he was a young jail kid all hung-up on the wonderful possibilities of becoming a real intellectual, and he liked to talk in the tone and using the words, but in a jumbled way, that he had heard from “real intellectuals” - although, mind you, he wasn’t so naive as that in all other things, and it took him just a few months with Carlo Marx to become completely in there with all the terms and jargon. Nonetheless we understood each other on other levels of madness, and I agreed that he could stay at my house till he found a job and furthermore we agreed to go out West sometime. That was the winter of 1947.”
  10. #118
    “I’ve come to believe that creativity is the mechanism that allows learning to seep into our being and become practice. The Asaro tribe of Indonesia and Papua New Guinea has a beautiful saying: ‘Knowledge is only a rumor until it lives in the muscle.’”
  11. #119
    “What dost thou know of suffering and oppression? I and my people know, but not thou.”
  12. #120
    “Man is to become God-like through a life of virtue and the cultivation of the spirit through scientific knowledge, practice and bodily discipline.”
  13. #121
    “Self knowledge is the basis of true knowledge.”
  14. #122
    “Salvation is the freeing of the soul from its bodily fetters, becoming a God through knowledge and wisdom, controlling the forces of the cosmos instead of being a slave to them, subduing the lower nature and through awakening the Higher Self, ending the cycle of rebirth and dwelling with the netters who direct who direct and control the Great Plan.”
  15. #123
    “I wondered how he could live with her like this. He had more books than I’ve ever seen in all my life - two libraries, two rooms loaded from floor to ceiling around all four walls, and such books as the Apocryphal Something-or-Other in ten volumes. He played Verdi operas and pantomimed them in his pajamas with a great rip down the back. He didn’t give a damn about anything. He is a great scholar who goes reeling down the New York waterfront with original seventeenth-century musical manuscripts under his arm, shouting. He crawls like a big spider through the streets. His excitement blew out of his eyes in stabs of fiendish light. He rolled his neck in spastic ecstasy. He lisped, he writhed, he flopped, he moaned, he howled, he fell back in despair. He could hardly get a word out, he was so excited with life.”
  16. #124
    “First reports of him came to me through Chad King, who’d shown me a few letters from him written in a New Mexico reform school. I was tremendously interested in the letters because they so naively and sweetly asked Chad to teach him all about Nietzsche and all the wonderful intellectual things that Chad knew. At one point Carlo and I talked about the letters and wondered if we would ever meet the strange Dean Moriarty.”
  17. #125
    “The salon existed in opposition to university lecture halls. Guests believed that knowledge and culture could both be enhanced via intelligent dialogue.”
  18. #126
    “They say you retain knowledge even when you’re sleeping, if someone whispers in your ear.”
  19. #127
    “There is ‘true’ Knowledge. Learn thou it is this:
    To see one changeless Life in all the Lives,
    And in the Separate, One Inseparable.”
  20. #128
    “Knowledge, the thing known, and the mind which knows,
    These make the threefold starting-ground of act.”
  21. #129
    “The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age.”
  22. #130
    “In the most general sense, talent is the sum of a person’s abilities—his or her intrinsic gifts, skills, knowledge, experience, intelligence, judgment, attitude, character, and drive. It also includes his or her ability to learn and grow.”
  23. #131
    “Scripture knows nothing of a solitary Christian. People of faith are always members of a community.”
  24. #132
    “Who knows the end? What has risen may sink, and what has sunk may rise. Loathsomeness waits and dreams in the deep, and decay spreads over the tottering cities of men.”
  25. #133
    “Really knowing is good. Not knowing, or refusing to know, is bad, or amoral, at least. You can’t act if you don’t know.”
  26. #134
    We are only what we know, and I wished to be so much more than I was, sorely.
  27. #135
    “Only a warrior can endure the path of knowledge.”
  1. #136
    “I had a natural talent for selling to people, but without knowledge and resources, where was that going to get me? People always lecture the poor: ‘Take responsibility for yourself! Make something of yourself!’ But with what raw materials are the poor to make something of themselves?”
  2. #137
    “A man of knowledge lives by acting, not by thinking about acting. ”
  3. #138
    “I have no accurate knowledge of my age, never having seen any authentic record containing it.”
  4. #139
    “Knowledge isn’t a sign of divine favor. Prosperity is.”
  5. #140
    “There is false Knowledge: that which blindly clings
    To one as if ‘twere all, seeking no Cause,
    Deprived of light, narrow, and dull, and ‘dark.‘”
  6. #141
    ″‘Nothing generous about it. New knowledge is the most valuable commodity on earth. The more truth we have to work with, the richer we become.’
    Had I been a Bokononist then, that statement would have made me howl.”
  7. #142
    ″‘Child,’ said the Lion, ‘I am telling you your story, not hers. No one is told any story but their own.‘”
  8. #143
    “I’ve read hundreds of books about China over the decades. I know the Chinese. I’ve made a lot of money with the Chinese. I understand the Chinese mind.”
  9. #144
    ″‘Bree,’ said Aravis, who was not very interested in the cut of his tail,‘I’ve been wanting to ask you something for a long time. Why do you keep on swearing By The Lion and By The Lion’s Mane? I thought you hated lions.’
    ‘So I do,’ answered Bree. ‘But when I speak of THE Lion, of course I mean Aslan, the great deliverer of Narnia who drove away the Witch and the Winter. All Narnians swear by him.’
    ‘But is he a lion?’
    ‘No, no, of course not,’ said Bree in a rather shocked voice.
    ‘All the stories about him in Tashbaan say he is,’ replied Aravis. ‘And if he isn’t a lion why do you call him a lion?’
    ‘Well, you’d hardly understand it at your age,’ said Bree.”
  10. #145
    “Once a person knows a kiss and a kind word, you can’t blame him for never wanting to live without them again.”
  11. #146
    “But where were the Brahmans, where the priests, where the wise men or penitents, who had succeeded in not just knowing this deepest of all knowledge but also to live it?”
  12. #147
    “Knowledge is a basic human right. Equal access to all possible human experience is a basic human right.”
  13. #148
    “I’d love to watch TV all the time but it rots our brains.”
  14. #149
    “I know that already, everything’s breakable.”
  15. #150
    “I can’t know everything.”
  16. #151
    “This was the very reason why you were brought to Narnia, that by knowing me here for a little, you may know me better there.”
  17. #152
    “Words are finite organs of the infinite mind.”
  18. #153
    “I hate quotations. Tell me what you know.”
  19. #154
    “We are students of words: we are shut up in schools, and colleges, and recitation -rooms, for ten or fifteen years, and come out at last with a bag of wind, a memory of words, and do not know a thing.”
  20. #155
    “Genius is religious.”
  21. #156
    “Till this moment I never knew myself.”
  22. #157
    “Several of them would have protested if they could have found the right arguments.”
  23. #158
    “A woman, especially if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.”
  24. #159
    “The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”
  25. #160
    “One man’s life or death were but a small price to pay for the acquirement of the knowledge which I sought, for the dominion I should acquire and transmit over the elemental foes of our race.”
  26. #161
    “What may not be expected in a country of eternal light?”
  27. #162
    “So much has been done, exclaimed the soul of Frankenstein—more, far more, will I achieve; treading in the steps already marked, I will pioneer a new way, explore unknown powers, and unfold to the world the deepest mysteries of creation.”
    author
    Mary Shelley
    book
    Frankenstein
    character
    Victor
    concept
    knowledge
  1. #163
    “False face must hide what the false heart doth know.”
  2. #164
    “You are a wonderful creation. You know more than you think you know, just as you know less than you want to know.”
  3. #165
    “Knowing was a temptation. What you don’t know won’t tempt you.”
  4. #166
    “I do not know everything; still many things I understand.”
  5. #167
    “This is the problem with forever friends. They know too much.”
  6. #168
    “The way of the warrior is the way of knowing.”
  7. #169
    “You have allowed yourself to become angrier than you should . . . Anger has its place, but it will not help you here. The way of the warrior is the way of knowing. If that knowledge requires you to use anger, then you use anger, but you cannot wrest forth knowledge by losing your temper. Pain and frustration will be your only reward if you try.”
  8. #170
    “Change itself is neither good nor bad, but knowledge is always useful.”
  9. #171
    “[Y]ou cannot wrest forth knowledge by losing your temper. Pain and frustration will be your only reward if you try.”
  10. #172
    To be left alone on the tightrope of youthful unknowing is to experience the excruciating beauty of full freedom and the threat of eternal indecision
  11. #173
    “Knowing a man well never leads to hate and nearly always leads to love.”
  12. #174
    “I sometimes think if we knew all, we should be more glad to get away.”
  13. #175
    “Do you not think that there are things which you cannot understand, and yet which are; that some people see things that others cannot? But there are things old and new which must not be contemplate by men´s eyes, because they know -or think they know- some things which other men have told them. Ah, it is the fault of our science that it wants to explain all; and if it explain not, then it says there is nothing to explain.”
  14. #176
    “They trespassed upon my thoughts. They were intruders whose knowledge of life was to me an irritating pretense, because I felt so sure they could not possibly know the things I knew. Their bearing, which was simply the bearing of commonplace individuals going about their business in the assurance of perfect safety, was offensive to me like the outrageous flauntings of folly in the face of a danger it is unable to comprehend. I had no particular desire to enlighten them, but I had some difficulty in restraining myself from laughing in their faces, so full of stupid importance.”
  15. #177
    “That is just the way with some people. They get down on a thing when they don’t know nothing about it.”
  16. #178
    “That which is clearly known hath less terror than that which is but hinted at and guessed.”
  17. #179
    “What further inferences may we draw?”
    “Do none suggest themselves? You know my methods. Apply them!”
  18. #180
    “So many things are possible just as long as you don’t know they’re impossible.”
  19. #181
    “Strange about learning; the farther I go the more I see that I never knew even existed. A short while ago I foolishly thought I could learn everything - all the knowledge in the world. Now I hope only to be able to know of its existence, and to understand one grain of it. Is there time?
  20. #182
    “There are so many doors to open I am impatient to apply my own knowledge and skills to the problem.”
  21. #183
    “Ideologies are substitutes for true knowledge, and ideologues are always dangerous when they come to power, because a simple-minded I-know-it-all approach is no match for the complexity of existence.”
  22. #184
    “So, listen, to yourself and to those with whom you are speaking. Your wisdom then consists not of the knowledge you already have, but the continual search for knowledge, which is the highest form of wisdom.”
  23. #185
    “Lots of times you don’t know what interests you most till you start talking.”
  24. #186
    “Mark Watney’s prolonged mission and fight for survival are giving us more knowledge about Mars then the rest of the Ares program combined.”
  25. #187
    Knowledge, like air, is vital to life. Like air, no one should be denied it.
    author
    Alan Moore
    book
    V for Vendetta
    character
    V
    concept
    knowledge
  26. #188
    “In this hour Siddhartha ceased struggling with his fate, ceased suffering. On his face blossomed the serenity of knowledge, which no will opposes any longer, knowing perfection, in agreement with the flow of events, with the stream of life, full of compassion, full of sympathy, abandoned to the flow, belonging to unity.”
  27. #189
    “They knew everything, the Brahmans and their holy books, they knew everything, they had taken care of everything and of more than everything, the creation of the world, the origin of speech, of food, of inhaling, of exhaling, the arrangement of the senses, the acts of the gods, they knew infinitely much—but was it valuable to know all of this, not knowing that one and only thing, the most important thing, the solely important thing?”
  1. #190
    “Knowledge can be conveyed, but not wisdom. It can be found, it can be lived, it is possible to be carried by it, miracles can be performed with it, but it cannot be expressed in words and taught.”
  2. #191
    “Human knowledge is never contained in one person. It grows from the relationships we create between each other and the world, and still it is never complete.”
  3. #192
    “Before, I never knew how far I would go. Now I believe I have the answer. I will go as far as there is to go. I will go way too far.”
  4. #193
    “The same holds for success: you have to let it happen by not caring about it. I want you to listen to what your conscience commands you to do and go on to carry it out to the best of your knowledge. Then you will live to see that in the long-run—in the long-run, I say!—success will follow you precisely because you had forgotten to think about it.”
  5. #194
    “The fact is, I think, that my friends really didn’t know. They didn’t know because they didn’t want to know; but they didn’t know. They could have found out, at the time, only if they had wanted to very badly.”
  6. #195
    “Suspecting and knowing are not the same.”
  7. #196
    “Knowledge is the power of the mind. Wisdom is the power of the soul.”
  8. #197
    “I want to learn everything about everything. I want to eat it all up. I want to discover myself.”
  9. #198
    “At the academy, I found a book that explains how linder is sold in the lowlands. Apparently, our stone is so prized that the king himself will only use linder for his palaces, and the only place in all of Danland that produces linder is right here. So because demand for linder is high and supply is limited it’s worth a great deal.”
  10. #199
    “Would ye, O my sisters, really possess modesty . . . ye must acquire that soberness of mind, which the exercise of duties, and the pursuit of knowledge, alone inspire, or ye will remain in a doubtful dependent situation, and only be loved whilst ye are fair!”
  11. #200
    “Nature, in these respects, may safely be left to herself; let women only acquire knowledge and humanity, and love will teach them modesty.”
  12. #201
    “I’m a slow reader, but I usually get through seventy or eighty books a year, most fiction. I don’t read in order to study the craft; I read because I like to read”
  13. #202
    ″‘I intend to concentrate all of my efforts on the League,’ she said. ‘They appreciate me. For my knowledge as a nurse, for my moral character and exemplary behavior. I’m...I’m somebody to them.‘”
  14. #203
    “You can know anything. It’s all there. You just have to find it.”
  15. #204
    “The significance of our lives and our fragile planet is then determined only by our own wisdom and courage. We are the custodians of life’s meaning. We long for a Parent to care for us, to forgive us our errors, to save us from our childish mistakes. But knowledge is preferable to ignorance. Better by far to embrace the hard truth than a reassuring fable.”
  16. #205
    “We start out a million years ago in a small community on some grassy plain; we hunt animals, have children, and develop a rich social, sexual, and intellectual life, but we know almost nothing about our surroundings.”
  17. #206
    “You need to know a lot about your own tiny field of expertise, but for the vast majority of life’s necessities you rely blindly on the help of other experts, whose own knowledge is also limited to a tiny field of expertise.”
  18. #207
    “We are a way for the cosmos to know itself.”
  19. #208
    “The human collective knows far more today than did the ancient bands. But at the individual level, ancient foragers were the most knowledgeable and skilful people in history.”
  20. #209
    “Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge.”
  21. #210
    “Unk, old friend—almost everything I know for sure has come from fighting the pain from my antenna […] Whenever I start to turn my head and look at something, and the pain comes, I keep turning my head anyway, because I know I am going to see something I’m not supposed to see. Whenever I ask a question, and the pain comes, I know I have asked a really good question […] The more pain I train myself to stand, the more I learn. You are afraid of the pain now, Unk, but you won’t learn anything if you don’t invite the pain. And the more you learn, the gladder you will be to stand the pain.”
  22. #211
    “Already my personality was lopsided; my knowledge of feeling was far greater than my knowledge of fact. Though I was not aware of it, the next four years were to be the only opportunity for formal study in my life.”
  23. #212
    “He, too, who spends his day in dispensing his existing knowledge to all comers is unlikely to have either leisure or energy to acquire new.”
  24. #213
    “Knowledge is one thing, virtue is another; good sense is not conscience, refinement is not humility, nor is largeness and justness of view faith.”
  25. #214
    “From here on out, there’s just reality. I think that’s what maturity is: a stoic response to endless reality. But then, what do I know?”
  26. #215
    “I don’t know any more. I used to know, but I lost the knowledge a long time ago.”
  27. #216
  28. #217
    “It is clear, then, that wisdom is knowledge having to do with certain principles and causes. But now, since it is this knowledge that we are seeking, we must consider the following point: Of what kind of principles and of what kind of causes is wisdom the knowledge?”
  29. #218
    “Metaphysics involves intuitive knowledge of unprovable starting-points concepts and truth and demonstrative knowledge of what follows from them.”
  30. #219
    “Knowledge of the world means dissolving the solidity of the world.”
  31. #220
    “What had I seen? Too much. What did I know? Only that knowledge carries a damned high price. Miss Wilcox, my teacher, had taught me so much. Why had she never taught me that?”
  32. #221
    “It was a dreadful thing that he did, and he is not to be admired for it, but right then I felt I understood why he did it. I even felt a little sorry for him. He probably just wanted some company, for it is very lonely knowing things.”
  33. #222
    “When we put our faith and trust in God, we’ve done the one thing that a human can do to accomplish superhuman things. We have reached past human strength and knowledge. We’ve touched infinite strength and infinite knowledge.”
  34. #223
    “They had been brought up to think that the domestic virtues were self-evident and universal; they had been starved of the knowledge that most attracts the young mind: that the crown of life is the exercise of choice”
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