concept

age Quotes

53 of the best book quotes about age
  1. #1
    “You are aware that at this time a lady of thirty-three would be an affirmed spinster and considered unmarriageable.”
  2. #2
    “See here, why don’t you find some one your own age to talk to?”
  3. #3
    “Why do old men wake so early? Is it to have one longer day?”
  4. #4
    “Now, five years is nothing in a man’s life except when he is very young and very old...”
  5. #5
    “At my age, I should not be afraid of anything—certainly not my own past.”
  6. #6
    “A boy simply wasn’t worth a man’s wages. So I aged ten years overnight.”
  7. #7
    “The answer is logic. Or, to put it another way, the ability to reason analytically. Applied properly, it can overcome any lack of wisdom, which one only gains through age and experience.”
  8. #8
    “After a certain age, time just drizzles down upon your head like rain in the month of March: you’re always surprised at how much of it can accumulate, and how fast.”
  9. #9
    “For when youth passes with its giddy train, Troubles on troubles follow, toils on toils, Pain, pain for ever pain; And none escapes life’s coils. Envy, sedition, strife, Carnage and war, make up the tale of life. Last comes the worst and most abhorred stage Of unregarded age, Joyless, companionless and slow.”
  10. #10
    “What degradation lay in being young.”
  1. #11
    “There still faintly beamed from the woman’s features something of the freshness, and even the prettiness, of her youth; rendering it evident that the personal charms which Tess could boast were in main part her mother’s gift, and therefore unknightly, unhistorical.”
  2. #12
    “Every young geisha may be proud of her hairstyle at first, but she comes to hate it within three or four days.”
  3. #13
    “Age acquires no value save through thought and discipline.”
  4. #14
    “When she got to be thirty and was still single, we were ... vindicated.”
  5. #15
    “Only a man of Colonel Sartoris’ generation and thought could have invented it, and only a woman could have believed it.”
  6. #16
    “I still fly a lot in my dreams, she told us, but I try to stay close to the ground. At my age, a fall can be pretty serious.”
  7. #17
    “Age is foolish and forgetful when it underestimates youth.”
  8. #18
    “O the sad music of it all, I’ve done it all, seen it all, done everything with everybody.”
  9. #19
    “Never slow down, never look back, live each day with adolescent verve and spunk and curiosity and playfulness.”
  10. #20
    “I once heard Alan Watts observe that a Chinese child will ask, “How does a baby grow?” But an American child will ask, “How do you make a baby?” From an early age, we absorb our culture’s arrogant conviction that we manufacture everything, reducing the world to mere “raw material” that lacks all value until we impose our designs and labor on it.”

Books about perspective

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Square book
Picture book
5.8
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My Panda Sweater book
Picture book
5.5
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Love by Sophia book
Picture book
5.5
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A Perfect Day book
Picture book
5.5
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Are Your Stars Like My Stars? book
Picture book
5.3
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The Digger and the Flower book
Picture book
5.0
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You See, I See: In the City book
Board book
4.8
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  1. #21
    “Everyone my age remembers where they were and what they were doing when they first heard about the contest.”
  2. #22
    “Where have you been?” she cried. “Damn you, where have you been?” She took a few steps toward Schmendrick, but she was looking beyond him, at the unicorn.
    When she tried to get by, the magician stood in her way. “You don’t talk like that,” he told her, still uncertain that Molly had recognized the unicorn. “Don’t you know how to behave, woman? You don’t curtsy, either.”
    But Molly pushed him aside and went up to the unicorn, scolding her as though she were a strayed milk cow. “Where have you been?” Before the whiteness and the shining horn, Molly shrank to a shrilling beetle, but this time it was the unicorn’s old dark eyes that looked down.
    “I am here now,” she said at last.
    Molly laughed with her lips flat. “And what good is it to me that you’re here now? Where where you twenty years ago, ten years ago? How dare you, how dare you come to me now, when I am this?” With a flap of her hand she summed herself up: barren face, desert eyes, and yellowing heart. “I wish you had never come. Why did you come now?” The tears began to slide down the sides of her nose.
    The unicorn made no reply, and Schmendrick said, “She is the last. She is the last unicorn in the world.”
    “She would be.” Molly sniffed. “It would be the last unicorn in the world to come to Molly Grue.” She reached up then to lay her hand on the unicorn’s cheek; but both of them flinched a little, and the touch came to rest on on the swift, shivering place under the jaw. Molly said, “It’s all right. I forgive you.”
  3. #23
    “Thirty-five is a very attractive age. London society is full of women of the very highest birth who have, of their own free choice, remained thirty-five for years.”
  4. #24
    “Changing size doesn’t change the brain. If I made you twenty-five tomorrow, Jim, your thoughts would still be boy thoughts, and it’d show! Or if they turned me into a boy of ten this instant, my brain would still be fifty and that boy would act funnier and older and weirder than any boy ever.”
  5. #25
    “I have no accurate knowledge of my age, never having seen any authentic record containing it.”
  6. #26
    Well, he died. You don’t get any older than that.
  7. #27
    ″‘Wisdom is sometimes given to the young, as well as to the old,’ he said; ‘and what you have spoken is wise, not to call it by a better word.‘”
  8. #28
    “The older the violin, the sweeter the music.”
  9. #29
    “My mind possessed the wisdoms of the ages, and there were no words adequate to describe them.”
  10. #30
    Thou shouldst not have been old till thou hadst been wise.
  1. #31
    “People create little ideas about ages so they can write silly self-help books, stick stupid comments in birthday cards, create names for Internet chat rooms, and look for excuses for crises that are happening in their life.
    For example the man’s so called ‘midlife crisis’ is just a bunch of hype. Age is not the problem; it’s the male brain that’s the problem. Men have been cheating since they were apes (insert your own joke there), since cavemen times (and again there) all the way up to now, the age of what is supposed to be the civilized man. That’s the way they were made. Age is not the issue.”
  2. #32
    “Age is just a number, not a state of mind or a reason for any type of particular behaviour.”
  3. #33
    “Age or virtue may give men a just precedency.”
  4. #34
    “No, that is the great fallacy, the wisdom of old men. They do not grow wise. They grow careful.”
  5. #35
    “Even we, who were boys but a short while ago, cannot escape the inexorable progress of time. So the generations pass, and soon it will be our turn to send our children out into the land to do the work that needs to be done.”
  6. #36
    Every man desires to live long, but no man wishes to be old.
  7. #37
    A wife should be always a reasonable and agreeable companion, because she cannot always be young.
  8. #38
    “One can’t judge till one’s forty; before that we’re too eager, too hard, too cruel, and in addition much too ignorant.”
  9. #39
    Peter, you’re twelve years old. I’m ten. They have a word for people our age. They call us children and they treat us like mice.
  10. #40
    ″‘I am old, Gandalf. I don’t look it, but I am beginning to feel it in my heart of hearts. Well-preserved indeed!’ he snorted. ‘Why, I feel all thin, sort of stretched, if you know what I mean: like butter that has been scraped over too much bread. That can’t be right. I need a change, or something.‘”

Books about change

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Goodbye, Friend! Hello, Friend! book
Picture book
6.5
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Nobody Hugs A Cactus book
Picture book
6.0
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Little Home Bird book
Picture book
5.8
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Grandma book
Picture book
5.8
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Growing Season book
Picture book
5.6
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Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut book
Picture book
5.5
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Three Pennies book
Chapter book
5.5
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Caspian Finds a Friend book
Picture book
5.3
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  1. #41
    “The unicorn lived in a lilac wood, and she lived all alone. She was very old, though she did not know it, and she was no longer the careless color of sea foam but rather the color of snow falling on a moonlit night. But her eyes were still clear and unwearied, and she still moved like a shadow on the sea.”
  2. #42
    “Then thought about herself. Years ago, she had told her girl self to wait for her in the looking glass. It had been a long time since she had remembered. Perhaps she’d better look. She went over to the dresser and looked hard at her skin and features. The young girl was gone, but a handsome woman had taken her place.”
  3. #43
    “Tristran Thorn, at the age of seventeen, and only six months older than Victoria, was halfway between a boy and a man, and was equally uncomfortable in either role; he seemed to be composed chiefly of elbows and Adam’s apples.”
    author
    Neil Gaiman
    book
    Stardust
    character
    Tristran
    concepts
    agematurity
  4. #44
    “We all have souls of different ages.”
  5. #45
    “You ought to be ashamed, I said, to look so antique.
    (And her only thirty-one)
    I can’t help it, she said, pulling a long face,
    It’s them pills I took, to bring it off, she said.”
  6. #46
    “The old sleep poorly. Perhaps they stand watch.”
  7. #47
    “Obviously, Doctor ... you’ve never been a thirteen-year-old girl. ”
  8. #48
    “Sirs, if you mean to take only one of us, it should be Frankie. He’s one of the youngest here. Mrs Pennyweather plans to put me out to hire soon. I’m not old enough, but I guess I’m big enough. It’s why she’s not too keen on me leaving. But if I’m out working for months at a time. I won’t be able to look out for Frankie. And he’s still little.”
  9. #49
    “It is the nature of a man as he grows older, a small bride in time, to protest against change, particularly change for the better.”
  10. #50
    “This should be agony. I should be a mass of aching muscle--broken, spent, unable to move. And, were I an older man, I surely would... But I am a man of thirty--of twenty again. The rain on my chest is a baptism--I’m born again.”
  11. #51
    “It don’t matter how young you are or how old you get or how brittle your bones are or how leaky your gray cells, you are still going to flat like a happy ending.”
  12. #52
    ″... every day the increasing weight of years admonishes me more and more, that the shade of retirement is as necessary to me as it will be welcome.”
  13. #53
    “Never slip the silver key of gate through your golden age.”
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